Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 17 January 2020

Abstract and Keywords

In the past decade or so, there has been a substantial body of work in law and humanities in which “performance” serves as a key word, an umbrella term for a highly diverse set of inquiries: the examination of trials as theater, courtroom testimony, improvisatory judicial interpretation, embodied cognition, “acoustic jurisprudence,” adversarial agonism, physiognomic credibility, video representation, symbolic “speech,” police encounters, terrorism, the production of legal identities, and more. This chapter explores the meaning of “performance” in such studies, and recounts the author’s attempts to map the terrain: to identify the separate kinds of inquiry that make up the study of law and performance; to offer a taxonomic overview of the whole. It describes the challenges the author encountered in attempting to do so, and what these reveal of the issues facing the study of law and performance. The last section reflects on some of the risks of interdisciplinary study generally, and the potential benefits that might accrue to law and performance if it resists becoming a “field” and remains, instead, a contingent conjunction.

Keywords: performance, performativity, theatricality, interdisciplinary, disciplinary

Access to the complete content on Oxford Handbooks Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can''t find the answer there, please contact us.