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date: 15 July 2019

Abstract and Keywords

This chapter identifies intertextual relationships among different screen adaptations of Annie. The 1982, 1999, and 2014 films not only offer different takes on the material, but they also contain connections to one another as part of the cultural influence of Annie as a larger cultural text stemming back to the 1924 comic strip. This gives rise in the chapter to an exploration of the reinventions of Annie rather than passing judgement on their respective levels of commercial, cultural, or musical merit. The chapter observes how the 1999 Disney version is more influenced by the Broadway original than by the 1982 film, but the 2014 remake combines influences from Broadway and from the 1982 movie, including a chase through Manhattan that closely matches the climactic sequence from 1982; the 1999 version has not had an obvious influence on the 2014 movie, however. In this manner, each film’s reinventions offer just enough of the original narrative and music for a new generation of viewers to recognize and accept it as their Annie.

Keywords: Annie, Charles Strouse, Lee Adams, adaptation, Broadway

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