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date: 23 July 2019

(p. xv) List of Contributors

(p. xv) List of Contributors

Martin A. Andresen is Professor of Criminology and Director of the Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University. His current research interests are in spatial crime analysis, crime and place, geography of crime, environmental criminology, applied spatial statistics, and geographical information analysis.



Christopher J. Bates is a PhD student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. His research interest focuses on neighborhoods and how physical design environments influence well-being. He has published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.



Peter Baudains is a former researcher at the Department of Security and Crime Science, University College London. His interests lie in the application of mathematical modeling to problems in crime and security. He is now working as a data scientist in the fraud detection industry.



Wim Bernasco is a senior researcher at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement and a Professor in the Department of Spatial Economics at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. His research interests include offender travel behavior, target selection, and situational causes of offending and victimization.



Daniel Birks is a member of the Griffith Criminology Institute, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. He holds degrees in artificial intelligence, computer science, cognitive science, and criminology. His research interests are broadly based in the fields of environmental criminology, crime analysis, and computational methods.



Anthony Bottoms is Emeritus Wolfson Professor of Criminology at the University of Cambridge and Honorary Professor of Criminology at the University of Sheffield. He is a fellow of the British Academy, and received a knighthood in the Queen’s Birthday Honours of 2001. He has also received awards from both the American Society of Criminology and the European Society of Criminology.



Kate Bowers is a Professor in Crime Science at the University College London Department of Security and Crime Science. She has worked in the field of crime science for over 20 years and has published more than 100 papers, books, and book chapters in environmental criminology and crime science. Her most recent research has focused on developing advanced methods for crime analysis (including innovative data sets), and improving the evidence base for crime prevention.



(p. xvi) Nicholas Branic is a PhD student at the University of California, Irvine, and a member of the Irvine Laboratory for the Study of Space and Crime directed by Dr. Charis Kubrin and Dr. John Hipp. His research interests include the community context of crime, neighborhood change, social inequalities, and research methods.



Patricia L. Brantingham is Professor of Criminology, RCMP University Chair of Computational Criminology, and Associate Director of the Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her current research interests are in computational criminology, pattern theory, environmental criminology, crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), criminal justice planning, and policy evaluations.



Paul J. Brantingham is a professor of criminology, RCMP University Chair of Crime Analysis, and Associate Director of the Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University. His current research interests are in computational criminology, pattern theory, environmental criminology, ecology of crime, crime analysis, historical criminology, and comparative criminal justice.



Gerben J. N. Bruinsma is the former Director and nowadays Senior Researcher of the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement in Amsterdam, and Professor Emeritus of Environmental Criminology at the Department of Criminal Law and Criminology of the Faculty of Law of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. His current interests are environmental, theoretical, and historical criminology.



Ian Brunton-Smith is Professor of Criminology and Quantitative Methods in the Department of Sociology at the University of Surrey. His current research interests include the role of context effect in shaping social outcomes, the spatial patterning of crimes, and the impacts of prison on prisoners.



Vania Ceccato is Associate Professor at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden, and coordinator of the national network for crime prevention SafePlaces (Säkraplatser). In Brazil, she is affiliated with São Paulo State University (Unesp) and University of Campinas (Unicamp). Ceccato’s research is on transit safety, housing and community safety, rural crime, and gender and intersectionality in safety issues.



James A. Cheshire is a Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Human Geography in the Department of Geography of University College London, London.



Timothy Coupe works at the Institute of Criminology of Cambridge University, Cambridge. His research interests are policing, crime detection and investigation, and burglary.



Francis T. Cullen is Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus and a Senior Research Associate in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. He is author of Environmental Corrections. His current research focuses on the organization of criminological knowledge and on rehabilitation as a correctional policy. He is a past (p. xvii) president of both the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences.



Toby Davies is a Lecturer in the Department of Security & Crime Science at University College London. His research is concerned with the application of quantitative methods to the modelling of crime, with particular emphasis on the application of spatio-temporal analysis and network science.



John E. Eck is Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. His research and writing focuses on police effectiveness and on the study and prevention of crime at high-crime places.



Graham Farrell is a Professor in the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies at the School of Law, University of Leeds. He has published 15 books and over 100 research papers, mostly in the area of crime science, particularly situational crime prevention and crime analysis, repeat victimization, policing, and illicit drug control. He has published widely on the security hypothesis that identified the role of security in the international crime drop.



Marcus Felson is Professor at Texas State University and recipient of the Honoris Causa from the Universidad Miguel Hernandez in Spain. He originated the routine activity approach to crime rate analysis and is author of Crime and Nature and coauthor of Crime and Everyday Life and Opportunity Makes the Thief. He has extended the routine activity theory to many topics, including white-collar crime, corruption, organized crime, and juvenile gangs.



Elizabeth R. Groff is an Associate Professor in the Criminal Justice Department at Temple University. Her research interests include place-based criminology, modeling geographical influences on human activity, the role of technology in police organizations, and the development of innovative methodologies using geographic information systems, agent-based simulation models, and randomized controlled field experiments.



Rob T. Guerette is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice in the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University. He currently serves as the Director of the International Crime and Justice doctoral program. His research interests include situational crime prevention, problem- and community-based policing, transnational crime, and program and policy evaluation. He received his PhD from Rutgers University.



Wim Hardyns is Lecturer in Criminology in the Department of Criminology, Criminal Law and Social Law at Ghent University. He has been a member of the Institute of International Research on Criminal Policy since 2015. His current interests are crime mapping and statistics, environmental criminology, crime prevention, new security technologies, big data, radicalization, and terrorism.



John R. Hipp is a Professor in the Departments of Criminology, Law and Society, and Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. His research interests focus on how (p. xviii) neighborhoods change over time, how that change both affects and is affected by neighborhood crime, and the role networks and institutions play in that change.



Evelien M. Hoeben recently received her PhD from the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement and VU University Amsterdam. She currently works as an Assistant Professor at the School of Criminal Justice at the State University of New York at Albany. Her research interests include peer influences on adolescent behavior, group dynamics, and situational explanations for deviance.



Dainis Ignatans is a Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Huddersfield. His current research interests revolve around statistical examination of repeat victimization patterns as well as exploration of crime committed against, by, and within diverse immigrant communities.



Helen Innes is a Research Associate at Cardiff University specializing in the secondary analysis of large social surveys. Most recently, she has been working with the Metropolitan Police Service on a field experiment examining the efficacy of crime prevention communications, as part of a larger project developing a theory of behavioral crime prevention.



Martin Innes is Director of the Police Science Institute and Crime and Security Research Institute, both at Cardiff University. His most recent book is Signal Crimes, published by Oxford University Press. His current research interests are in counterterrorism policing, the implications of open source communications technologies for social reactions to crime, and innovations in policing.



Shane D. Johnson is Professor and Director of the Dawes Centre for Future Crime at University College London. His current research interests include understanding the changing nature of crime, and the application of multidisciplinary approaches to urban crime problems.



J. Bryan Kinney is Associate Professor, School of Criminology, at Simon Fraser University and Director of the Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies Laboratory. Kinney is a specialist in crime analysis and crime prevention and in the use of computer analysis. His current research interests also include public safety in northern, rural, remote communities, and historical reactions to crime and deviance.



Edward R. Kleemans is Full Professor at the School of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. His research interests include organized crime, drug trafficking, human smuggling, human trafficking, cybercrime, fraud, money laundering, social organization, and the interaction between offenders and the criminal justice system.



Charis E. Kubrin is Professor of Criminology, Law and Society and (by courtesy) Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. Kubrin’s research focuses on neighborhood correlates of crime, with an emphasis on race and violent crime. In addition to her work in peer-reviewed journals, Kubrin is coauthor of Researching Theories of Crime (p. xix) and Deviance (Oxford University Press 2008) and coeditor of Introduction to Criminal Justice (Stanford University Press, 2013).



Teresa C. Kulig is a doctoral student in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. Her recent writings have appeared in Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice Education, and Victims and Offenders. Her research interests include testing theories of victimization, human trafficking and child exploitation, correctional treatment, and the organization of criminological knowledge through meta-analysis.



Brian Lawton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. His areas of research include environmental criminology and spatial analyses.



Fernando Miró Llinares is Professor of Criminal Law and criminology, director of the CRIMINA Research Center for the Study and Prevention of Crime, and Dean of the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at Miguel Hernández University in Spain. Author of more than 80 publications, he has particular interests in applying crime theories to cybercrime, and in environmental criminology, modern criminal law, and new technologies in crime.



Tamara D. Madensen is an Associate Professor and Graduate Director in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She is the Associate Director of UNLV’s Center for Crime and Public Policy and manages the associated Crowd Management Research Council. Her current research interests are place management, crime opportunity structures, and crowd dynamics and violence.



Andrew Newton is an Associate Professor of Criminology in the Department of Criminology, University of Leicester. He has a multidisciplinary background in criminology, geography, and urban studies. His research interests include crime and place, policy analysis, and evaluation; investigating and explaining crime patterns; crime, technology, and society; and crime and the built environment.



Lieven J. R. Pauwels is Professor of Criminology at Ghent University, Department of Criminology, Criminal Law and Social Law and Director of the Institute for International Research on Criminal Policy. He is interested in the integration of developmental, ecological, and situational theories, measurement problems in quantitative criminology, and the philosophy of science.



Ken Pease is a chartered forensic psychologist and Visiting Professor of Crime Science at the Jill Dando Institute, University College London, and at Loughborough University. His current interests are the use of Bayesian statistics in evaluating police work, and the renewed relevance of personal construct theory in the digital age.



Danielle M. Reynald is a Senior Lecturer and Criminologist at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and the Griffith Criminology Institute in Brisbane, Australia. Her main research interests include the role of (p. xx) guardianship in crime prevention and control, crime prevention through environmental design, and offender decision making.



D. Kim Rossmo is the University Chair and the Director of the Center for Geospatial Intelligence and Investigation in the School of Criminal Justice at Texas State University. He was formerly the Detective Inspector in charge of the Vancouver Police Department’s Geographic Profiling Section, the Director of Research for the Police Foundation, and a management consultant with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.



Reka Solymosi is a Lecturer in Quantitative Criminology at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom. Before that she was a data analyst researching issues around transport crime and policing at Transport for London. Her main interests are crowdsourced data collection, transport crime, and perception of crime and place.



Justin Song is a Research Assistant in the Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies as well as technical staff in the Department of Geography at Simon Fraser University. His current research interests are spatial analysis of crime, geovisualization, and geographic information systems.



Valerie Spicer is a Postdoctoral Fellow conducting research with the Institute of Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her research interests include environmental criminology, fear of crime, and big-data crime analysis techniques. She is an 18-year member of the Vancouver Police Department and currently deployed as an operational sergeant in Vancouver’s downtown core.



Lucia Summers is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Texas State University, San Marcos. Her research interests include the spatiotemporal patterns of crime, offender spatial decision-making, and situational crime prevention. Lucia received her PhD in criminology from University College London in 2012.



Kristin Swartz is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Louisville. Her research focuses on how offending and victimization is shaped by context, with a special focus on cultural effects in the contexts of schools, communities, and correctional institutions.



Sema A. Taheri is a doctoral candidate in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University and a Senior Research Fellow at Measures for Justice. Her research interests include translational criminology and evidence-based criminal justice innovation.



Ralph B. Taylor is a Professor of Criminal Justice and member of the Center for Security and Crime Science at Temple University. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Justice, and others. His 2015 volume Community Criminology (New York University Press) confronts four challenges currently bedeviling work on spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal ecologies of crime.



(p. xxi) Cody W. Telep is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. His current interests include evidence-based policing, police legitimacy, and experimental methodologies.



Nick Tilley is a Professor in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London and an Adjunct Professor at the Griffith Criminology Institute in Brisbane. His main research interests lie in evaluation methodology, policing, situational crime prevention, and the international crime drop.



George E. Tita is a Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society and the Director of the Masters of Public Policy Program at the University of California, Irvine. His current interests include studying systems that generate crime patterns, social network analysis of crime, and the study of illegal firearms markets.



Lisa Tompson is a Lecturer in the Department of Security and Crime Science of University College London. Her research interests are spatiotemporal crime patterns and embedding evidence into police practice. She is a former police crime analyst.



Michael Tonry is McKnight Presidential Professor of Criminal Law and Policy and Director, Institute on Crime and Public Policy, University of Minnesota. He edits Crime and Justice: A Review of Research and writes on a topics including criminal justice policy, punishment theory, comparative criminal justice, race and crime, and sentencing.



Michael Townsley is an Associate Professor and Head of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University. He is best known for demonstrating that burglary risk is infectious, a concept underpinning much of predictive policing and crime-forecasting methods. More broadly, his research interests focus on diagnosing crime problems in order to reduce, prevent, or alleviate their occurrence.



Andromachi Tseloni is Professor of Quantitative Criminology and leads the Quantitative and Spatial Criminology Research Group at Nottingham Trent University. She is currently Treasurer of the British Society of Criminology and member of the Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership Board. Her research revolves around crime victimization and inequalities; the “crime drop”; crime perceptions; social capital; and cross-national comparisons.



Faisal Umar is a Lecturer at the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. He received his PhD in Geographic Information Science at University College London. His current research concerned with how Euro-American theories of urban crime could be applied in the context of developing countries such as Nigeria. Other research interests revolve around the broader field of Urban Planning/Studies much of which involves the application of geographic information system (GIS) techniques in the analysis of urban datasets.



Matthew Valasik is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology in the Department of Sociology at Louisiana State University. His primary interests are the (p. xxii) sociospatial dynamics of gang behavior and problem-oriented policing strategies (e.g., gang units, civil gang injunctions) used by law enforcement.



Frank M. Weerman is Senior Researcher of the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement in Amsterdam, and Professor of Youth Criminology at the Erasmus University, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. His research interests focus on explanation of juvenile delinquency, in particular on the role of peers, groups, and contexts.



David Weisburd is Distinguished Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University in Virginia. He also holds an appointment as the Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Professor Weisburd was the recipient of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology in 2010, and the Sutherland Award from the American Society of Criminology in 2014.



Brandon C. Welsh is a Professor of Criminology and Director of the Cambridge-Somerville Youth Study at Northeastern University. He is also the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences Visiting Professor and Senior Research Fellow at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement in Amsterdam. His research focuses on the prevention of delinquency and crime and evidence-based social policy



Pamela Wilcox is a Professor in the School of Criminal Justice and Fellow of the Graduate School at University of Cincinnati. Her research focuses on understanding the opportunity for crime and victimization in school and community contexts. She is past chair of the Crime, Law, and Deviance section of the American Sociological Association and former Executive Counselor for the American Society of Criminology.



Mats Wilhelmsson is the former Director of Center for Banking and Finance and now the Vice Dean at the School of Architecture and Built Environment at Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. He is also Professor in Applied Financial Economics, and his research is focused on housing and urban economics.



Richard Wortley has been Director of the University College London Jill Dando Institute since 2010. His research interests center on the role that immediate environments play in criminal behavior and how that behavior can be altered through situational crime prevention. His research has focused particularly on the situational prevention of child sexual abuse.



Kathryn Wuschke is an Assistant Professor at Portland State University and a member of the Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. Her research focuses on spatial crime analysis, with particular focus on the impact of land use and urban development on local patterns of crime.