Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 16 December 2019

(p. xi) Contributors

(p. xi) Contributors

Isabella Alcañiz holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Northwestern University (2004) and is Assistant Professor in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland. She has a forthcoming book with Cambridge University Press, Environmental and Nuclear Networks in the Global South: How Skills Shape International Cooperation. Her research on environmental politics, states in the global south, social network analysis, political economy of skills, and Latin American politics has been published in the British Journal of Political Science, Latin American Perspective, Latin American Research Review, and elsewhere.



Barry Ames holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University (1972) and is Professor of Comparative Politics at the University of Pittsburgh. He is author of The Deadlock of Democracy in Brazil (University of Michigan Press 2001) and his research on Latin American politics has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, Legislative Politics in Latin America, and elsewhere.



Andy Baker holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison (2001) and is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is author of Shaping the Developing World: The South, the West, and the Natural World (Congressional Quarterly Press 2014) and his research on Latin American politics, political economy, political behavior, international political economy, and Brazil has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, World Politics, Electoral Studies, and elsewhere.



Paul A. Beck holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan (1971) and is Professor Emeritus at the Ohio State University. He is coauthor of Party Politics in America with Marjorie Randon Hershey (Longman 2003) and his research on political parties, voting behavior, and public opinion has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, International Journal of Public Opinion Research, Party Politics, American Political Science Review, and elsewhere.



Ramiro Berardo holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Florida State University (2006) and is Assistant Professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at the Ohio State University. His research on policy networks, collaborative governance, public policy, and collective action dilemmas has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, The Journal of Politics, Policy Studies Journal, Political Research Quarterly, and elsewhere. (p. xii)



Steven P. Borgatti holds a Ph.D. in Mathematical Social Science from the University of California, Irvine (1989) and is Professor and Paul Chellgren Endowed Chair at the University of Kentucky in the Management Department of the Gatton College of Business and Economics. He is coauthor of Analyzing Social Networks with Martin Everett and Jeff Johnson (Sage Publications 2013) and his research on social networks, knowledge management, and computational models has been published in Science, Social Networks, Organization Science, Academy of Management Review, and elsewhere.



Janet M. Box-Steffensmeier holds a Ph.D. in Government from the University of Texas (1993) and is Vernal Riffe Professor of Political Science at the Ohio State University. She is coauthor of Event History Modeling: A Guide for Social Scientists with Bradford S. Jones (Cambridge University Press 2004) and her research on American politics, public opinion, elections, and time series methodology has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, and elsewhere.



Jeffrey Broadbent holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University (1982) and is Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota. He is author of Environmental Politics in Japan: Networks of Power and Protest (Cambridge University Press 1997), which won two academic awards, and is coauthor of Comparing Policy Networks: Labor Politics in the U.S., Germany, and Japan with David Knoke, Franz Pappi, and Yutaka Tsujinaka (Cambridge University Press 1996). His research on political networks, climate change, comparative sociology, Japan, and social movements has been published in the Journal of Japanese Studies, Policy Sciences, Journal of Civil Society, American Sociological Review, and elsewhere.



Stephanie Chan is a candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (2017) and will begin Princeton University’s Politics doctoral program in Fall 2017.



Wendy K. Tam Cho holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkley (1997) and is Professor in the Departments of Political Science and Statistics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research on statistical and computational models for social science has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, The American Statistician, Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, and elsewhere.



Dino P. Christenson holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Ohio State University (2010) and is Associate Professor of Political Science at Boston University. He is coauthor of Applied Social Science Methodology: An Introductory Guide with John Gerring (Cambridge University Press 2017) and his research on American political behavior and quantitative methods has been published in American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Political Behavior, Social Networks, and elsewhere.



Skyler J. Cranmer holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Davis (2007) and is Carter Phillips and Sue Henry Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the Ohio State University. His research on network analysis, political networks, political methodology, international relations, and conflict processes has been published in Political Analysis, Conflict Management and Peace Science, Policy Studies Journal, and elsewhere. (p. xiii)



Bruce A. Desmarais holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2010) and is Associate Professor of Political Science at Pennsylvania State University. His research on political institutions, political methodology, computational social science, network analysis, and machine learning has been published in Political Analysis, American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Social Networks, and elsewhere.



Cassy Dorff holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Duke University (2015) and is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. Her research on conflict studies, international relations, social movements, network analysis, and forecasting has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, International Studies Review, Political Science Research and Methods, International Interactions, and elsewhere.



Mette Eilstrup-Sangiovanni holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the European University Institute (2001) and is Lecturer in International Studies in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Cambridge. Her research on international organization, international relations theory, international security, and institutional design has been published in International Studies Quarterly, International Spectator, International Security, European Journal of International Relations, and elsewhere.



Giorgio Fagiolo holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the European University Institute (2001) and is Professor of Economics at the Laboratory of Economics and Management at the Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies. His research on agent-based computational economics and economic networks has been published in Science, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Physical Review, and elsewhere.



Richard C. Feiock holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Kansas (1986) and is the Augustus B. Turnbull Professor of Public Administration and Policy and Director of the Sustainable Energy and Governance Program in the Askew School of Public Administration and Policy at Florida State University. He is coauthor of Institutional Constraints and Local Policy Choices: An Exploration of Local Governance with James Clingermayer (State University of New York Press 2001) and his research on governance, local government, and institutions has been published in the Journal of Urban Affairs, Urban Affairs Review, Public Administration Review, American Journal of Political Science, and elsewhere.



Manuel Fischer holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Geneva (2011) and is Lecturer in the Institute of Political Science at the University of Berne and Tenure Track Researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology. He is coauthor of Political Decision-Making in Switzerland with Pascal Sciarini and Denise Traber (Springer 2015) and his research on governance arrangements, decision-making processes, and political networks has been published in the Journal of Public Policy, Water Science and Technology, Journal of Politics, Social Networks, and elsewhere. (p. xiv)



Sandra González-Bailón holds a D.Phil. in Sociology from the University of Oxford (2007) and is Assistant Professor in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research on network science, data mining, computational tools, and political communication has been published in American Behavioral Scientist, Journal of Information Technology, Journal of Complex Networks, Social Networks, and elsewhere.



Justin H. Gross holds a Ph.D. in Statistics and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University (2010) and is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His research on mass media and political communication, public opinion, and public policy has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Social Networks, British Journal of Political Science, and elsewhere.



Jennifer Hadden holds a Ph.D. from Cornell University’s Department of Government (2011) and is Assistant Professor in the University of Maryland’s Department of Government and Politics. She is the author of Networks in Contention: The Divisive Politics of Climate Change (Cambridge University Press 2015) and her research on international relations, environmental politics, and non-state actors has been published in Global Environmental Politics, Journal of Politics, Mobilization, and elsewhere.



Michael T. Heaney holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and Public Policy from the University of Chicago (2004) and is Assistant Professor of Organizational Studies at the University of Michigan. He is coauthor of Party in the Street: The Antiwar Movement and the Democratic Party after 9/11 with Fabio Rojas (Cambridge University Press 2015) and his research on social networks, interest groups, social movements, and political parties has been published in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Sociology, Social Networks, and elsewhere.



Adam Douglas Henry holds a Ph.D. in Transportation Technology and Policy from the University of California, Davis (2009) and is Associate Professor in the School of Government and Public Policy at the University of Arizona. His research on sustainability science, network analysis, public policy, and social learning has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Policy Studies Journal, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, and elsewhere.



Paul S. Herrnson holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison (1986) and is Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Connecticut. He is the author of Congressional Elections: Campaigning at Home and in Washington (CQ Press, 2016 7th edition) and his research on political parties and elections, money and politics, public opinion, and voting technology and ballot design has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Electoral Studies, Election Law Journal, and elsewhere.



Matthew Jackson holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University (1988) where he also serves as William D. Eberle Professor of Economics. He is also an external faculty member at the Santa Fe Institute and a Senior Fellow of CIFAR. He is author of Social (p. xv) and Economic Networks (Princeton University Press 2008) and his research on game theory, microeconomic theory, and social and economic networks has been published in Science, PNAS, Social Networks, Journal of Economic Theory, American Economic Review, and elsewhere.



Joshua M. Jansa holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2016) and is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Oklahoma State University. His research on interest groups and lobbying, state politics and policymaking, class politics and income inequality, and economic development has been published in Economic Development Quarterly and State Politics and Policy Quarterly.



Lorien Jasny holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Irvine (2012) and is Lecturer at the University of Exeter in Political and Environmental Network Analysis. Her research on social networks, political sociology, and environmental sociology has been published in Policy Studies Journal, Society and Natural Resources, and Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest.



Alexandra P. Joosse holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis from the University of Arizona (2015). Her research on collaborative networks between government, non-profit, and for profit organizations has been published in Conflict Resolution Quarterly, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism.



David Kinsella holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University (1993) and is Professor of Political Science and International Studies and Chair of the Division of Political Science at Portland State University. He is coauthor of World Politics: The Menu for Choice with Bruce Russett and Harvey Starr (Wadsworth 2013, 10th edition) and his research on arms trade, international conflict, international law, and democratic peace has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, American Political Science Review, and elsewhere.



Justin H. Kirkland holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2012) and is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston. His research on legislative politics, state politics, social network analysis, and statistical methods has been published in the Journal of Politics, International Interactions, Social Networks, and elsewhere.



Casey A. Klofstad holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Harvard University (2005) and is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Miami. He is author of Civic Talk: Peers, Politics, and the Future of Democracy (Temple University Press 2011) and his research on social networks and political behavior has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, Public Opinion Quarterly, and elsewhere.



David Knoke holds a Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Work from the University of Michigan (1972) and is Professor at the University of Minnesota Department of (p. xvi) Sociology. He is the coauthor of Network Analysis with James H. Kuklinski (Sage Publications 1982) and author of Political Networks: The Structural Perspective (Cambridge University Press 1990). His research on social networks, organizations, political sociology, and economic sociology has been published in Management Decision, Applied Network Analysis, American Behavioral Scientist, American Sociological Review, and elsewhere.



Gregory Koger holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles (2002) and is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Miami. He is the author of Filibustering: A Political History of Obstruction in the House and Senate (University of Chicago Press 2010) and his research on legislative politics, political institutions, political parties, interest groups, and elections has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Legislative Studies Quarterly, British Journal of Political Science, and elsewhere.



Tetiana Kostiuchenko is a doctoral candidate in Sociology at National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in Kyiv, Ukraine, where she is also a senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology. She was a Carnegie Visiting Fellow at the University of Minnesota in 2014. Her research on political elites and power networks in Ukraine and Georgia has been published in Polish Sociological Review, Europe-Asia Studies, Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe, and elsewhere.



David Lazer holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan (1996) and is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Political Science and College of Computer and Information Science at Northeastern University. His research on network science, computational social science, political science, and organizational behavior has been published in Science, Law and Society Review, Administrative Science Quarterly, and elsewhere.



Claire Leavitt holds an M.A. in Political Science from Boston University (2015) and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Government at Cornell University.



Philip Leifeld holds a Ph.D. in Politics and Public Administration from the University of Konstanz (2011) and is Senior Lecturer in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Glasgow. He is author of Policy Debates as Dynamic Networks: German Pension Politics and Privatization Discourse (University of Chicago Press 2016) and his research on methodology, political networks, public policy, and polarization has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, European Journal of Political Research, American Behavioral Scientist, and elsewhere.



Zeev Maoz holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan (1981) and is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Davis. He is author of Defending the Holy Land: A Critical Analysis of Israel’s National Security and Foreign Policy (University of Michigan Press 2006) and his research on network analysis, international politics, Israeli national security and foreign policy, and international relations in the Middle East has been published in American (p. xvii) Political Science Review, Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Interactions, and elsewhere.



Seth Masket holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles (2004) and is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Denver. He is author of The Inevitable Party: Why Attempts to Kill Political Parties Fail and How They Weaken Democracy (Oxford University Press 2016) and his research on American politics, party organizations, state legislatures, campaigns and elections, and social networks has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, Perspectives on Politics, and elsewhere.



Scott D. McClurg holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Washington University in St. Louis (2000) and is Professor of Political Science at Southern Illinois University. His research on political behavior, elections, social networks, and political geography has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, Political Behavior, and elsewhere.



H. Brinton Milward holds a Ph.D. in Public Administration from the Ohio State University (1978) and is Director of the School of Government and Public Policy at the University of Arizona. His research on interorganizational networks, public management, collaboration, and terrorist networks has been published in Administrative Science Quarterly, Public Administration Review, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, and elsewhere.



Shahryar Minhas holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Duke University and will be an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Social Science Data Analytics Program at Michigan State University in 2017. His research on quantitative methods, political economy, and international relations has been published in International Interactions, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research, and Research and Politics.



James Moody holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is Robert O. Keohane Professor of Sociology at Duke University and Distinguished Adjunct Professor at King Abdulaziz University. His research on sociology, social networks, and quantitative methods has been published in American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, American Behavioral Scientist, and elsewhere.



Peter Mucha holds a Ph.D. in Applied and Computational Mathematics from Princeton University (1998) and is Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor of Mathematics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research on applied and computational mathematics, networks, and complex systems has been published in Physical Review, Journal of Applied Mathematics, Network Science, and elsewhere.



Amanda Murdie holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Emory University (2009) and is Professor of International Affairs at the University of Georgia. She is author of Help (p. xviii) or Harm: The Human Security Effects of International NGOs (Stanford University Press 2014) and her research on international relations, INGOs, human rights, and human security has been published in International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Human Rights Quarterly, and elsewhere.



Hans Noel holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles (2006) and is Associate Professor of Government at Georgetown University. He is author of Political Ideologies and Political Parties in America (Cambridge University Press 2013) and his research on political parties, ideology, methodology, presidential nominations, and political networks has been published in the British Journal of Political Science, Perspectives on Politics, Social Networks, and elsewhere.



John F. Padgett holds a Ph.D. in Sociology and Public Policy from the University of Michigan (1978) and is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. He is the coauthor of The Emergence of Organizations and Markets with Walter Powell (Princeton University Press 2012) and coauthor of the article “Robust Action and the Rise of the Medici, 1400–1434” with Christopher Ansell, published in American Journal of Sociology (University of Chicago Press 1993). His research on networks, organizations, complexity, and history has been published in Administrative Science Quarterly, American Political Science Review, American Politics Research, and elsewhere.



John W. Patty holds a Ph.D. in Economics and Political Science from the California Institute of Technology (2001) and is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. He is coauthor of Learning While Governing: Information, Accountability, and Executive Branch Institutions with Sean Gailmard (University of Chicago Press 2012) and his research on formal political theory, Congress, bureaucracy, political institutions, and American politics has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Games and Economic Behavior, Public Choice, and elsewhere.



Elizabeth Maggie Penn holds a Ph.D. in Social Science from the California Institute of Technology (2003) and is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. She is coauthor of Social Choice and Legitimacy: The Possibilities of Impossibility with John Patty (Cambridge University Press 2014) and her research on formal political theory has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, Public Choice, and elsewhere.



Arie Perliger holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Haifa (2007) and is Associate Professor in the Department of Social Sciences at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He is coauthor of Jewish Terrorism in Israel with Ami Pedahzur (Colulmbia University Press 2009) and his research on terrorism, political violence, and Israeli politics has been published in Political Studies, Security Studies, Israel Affairs, and elsewhere.



Jürgen Pfeffer has a Ph.D. in Business Informatics from Vienn a University of Technology. In 2012 he became Assistant Research Professor for Societal Computing at the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Since March 2016 Pfeffer serves as Professor for Computational Social Science and Big Data (p. xix) at the Bavarian School of Public Policy at the Technical University of Munich. Pfeffer’s research on the intersection of social science and computer science has been published in Science, Journal of Marketing Communications, Digital Journalism, and elsewhere.



Mark Pickup holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of British Columbia (2005) and is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Simon Fraser University. He is author of Introduction to Time Series: Quantitative Applications in the Social Sciences (Sage Publications 2014) and his research on the economy and democratic accountability, polls and electoral outcomes, and conditions of democratic responsiveness has been published in the Journal of Politics, Electoral Studies, Journal of Conflict Resolution, and elsewhere.



Marc Polizzi holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Missouri and is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Sociology at Murray State University.



Armando Razo holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University (2003) and is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Indiana University. He is author of Social Foundations of Limited Dictatorship (Stanford University Press 2008) and his research on political economy of development, informal institutions, social network analysis, and Latin American politics has been published in the Journal of Theoretical Politics, Journal of Latin American Studies, World Politics, and elsewhere.



Nils Ringe holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Pittsburgh (2006) and is Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is coauthor of Bridging the Information Gap: Legislative Member Organizations as Social Networks in the United States and the European Union with Jennifer Nicoll Victor (University of Michigan Press 2013) and his research on European Union politics, political parties, and social networks has been published in the Journal of European Public Policy, Legislative Studies Quarterly, British Journal of Political Science, and elsewhere.



Jon C. Rogowski holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago (2012) and is Assistant Professor of Government at Harvard University. He is coauthor of The Wartime President: Executive Influence and the Nationalizing Politics of Threat with William G. Howell and Saul P. Jackson (University of Chicago Press 2013) and his research on American politics, electoral politics, and American political institutions has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, Legislative Studies Quarterly, and elsewhere.



Meredith Rolfe holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago (2005) and is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is author of Voter Turnout: A Social Theory of Political Participation (Cambridge University Press 2012) and her research on decision-making, social networks, and political economy has been published in Social Networks, Network Science, Public Opinion Quarterly, and elsewhere. (p. xx)



Derek Ruths holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Rice University (2009) and is Associate Professor in the School of Computer Science at McGill University. His research on social informatics, network science, and natural language processing has been published in the Journal of Computational Biology, BMC Bioinformatics, Science, and elsewhere.



Lauren Ratliff Santoro holds a Master’s in Political Science from the Ohio State University (2013) and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at the Ohio State University.



Manoj Shrestha holds a Ph.D. in Public Administration and Policy from Florida State University (2008) and is Assistant Professor of Public Administration and Policy at the University of Idaho. His research on local government, social-ecological interaction, and community sustainability has been published in American Politics Review, State and Local Government Review, and elsewhere.



David A. Siegel holds a Ph.D. in Political Economics from Stanford University (2006) and is Associate Professor of Political Science at Duke University. He is coauthor of A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research with Will H. Moore (Princeton University Press 2013) and his research on collective action, political violence, and elections has been published in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, Journal of Peace Research, and elsewhere.



Betsy Sinclair holds a Ph.D. in Social Science from the California Institute of Technology (2007) and is Associate Professor of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis. She is author of The Social Citizen (University of Chicago Press 2012) and her research on American politics and political methodology has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, PS: Political Science and Politics, Political Research Quarterly, and elsewhere.



Amy Erica Smith holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Pittsburgh (2011) and is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Iowa State University. She is coauthor of Legitimidade e Qualidade da Democracia no Brasil: Uma Visão da Cidadania with Lucio Rennó, Matthew L. Layton, and Frederico Batista Pereira (Editora Intermeios 2011). Her research on political socialization and Latin American politics has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, Journal of Politics in Latin America, and elsewhere.



Tom A. B. Snijders holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University Groningen (1979) and is Emeritus Fellow of Nuffield College at the University of Oxford. He is coauthor of Multilevel Analysis: An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Multilevel Modeling with Roel J. Bosker (Sage Publications 1999) and his research on statistics, social networks, and multilevel analysis has been published in Social Networks, Sociological Methodology, Journal of the American Statistical Association, and elsewhere. (p. xxi)



Anand Edward Sokhey holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Ohio State University (2009) and is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His research on political behavior and American politics has been published in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, and elsewhere.



James M. Strickland holds a Master’s in Political Science from the University of Georgia (2014) and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Michigan.



Paul W. Thurner holds a Ph.D. from the University of Mannheim (1995) and is Professor of Empirical Political Science and Policy Analysis at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. He is coauthor of European Union Intergovernmental Conferences: Domestic Preference Formation, Transgovernmental Networks, and the Dynamics of Compromise with Franz U. Pappi (Routledge 2009) and his research on European politics has been published in the Journal of European Public Policy, Energy Policy, Advances in Statistical Analysis, and elsewhere.



Michael D. Ward holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Northwestern University (1977) and is professor of Political Science at Duke University. He is coauthor of Spatial Regression Models with Kristian S. Gleditsch (Sage Publications 2008) and his research on international relations, political economy, and security has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, International Organization, Journal of Conflict Resolution, and elsewhere.



Stanley Wasserman holds a Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University (1977) and is Rudy Professor of Statistics, Sociology, and Psychology at the University of Indiana, Bloomington. He is coauthor of the foundational book Social Network Analysis: Methods and Applications with Katherine Faust (Cambridge University Press 1994) and his research on applied statistics and network science has been published in the British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology, Administrative Science Quarterly, Social Networks, and elsewhere.



Stefan Wojcik holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder (2014) and is Postdoctoral Fellow at the Lazer Lab of Northeastern University.



Sijia Yang holds a Master’s in Communication from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2012) and is currently a Ph.D. student in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.



(p. xxii)