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date: 04 December 2020

(p. xi) Contributors

(p. xi) Contributors

Daina Ramey Berry is Oliver H. Radkey Professor of History and African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of Swing the Sickle for the Harvest Is Ripe: Gender and Slavery in Antebellum Georgia (2007) and The Price for Their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved, from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation (2017) and the editor-in-chief of Enslaved Women in America: An Encyclopedia (2012). Berry is also coeditor with Leslie Harris of Slavery and Freedom in Savannah (2014) and Sexuality and Slavery: Reclaiming Intimate Histories in the Americas (2018).



Sharon Block is professor of history at University of California, Irvine. She is the author of Rape and Sexual Power in Early America (2006) and Colonial Complexions: Race and Bodies in Eighteenth-Century America (2018), and various articles on computational humanities, including “What, Where, When, and Sometimes Why: Data Mining Two Decades of Women’s History Abstracts,” in Journal of Women’s History (2011). She is also a coeditor of Major Problems in American Women’s History (2013).



Eileen Boris is the Hull Professor and Distinguished Professor of Feminist Studies and Distinguished Professor of history, Black Studies, and Global Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Among her books are Home to Work: Motherhood and the Politics of Industrial Homework in the United States (1994) and, with Jennifer Klein, Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State (2012). Among her co-edited collections are Voices of Women Historians: The Personal, The Political, The Professional (1999), Intimate Labors: Technologies, Cultures, and the Politics of Care (2010), and Women’s ILO: Transnational Networks, Global Labour Standards, and Gender Equity (2018). Her latest book project is Making the Woman Worker: Precarious Labor and the Fight for Global Standards, 1919–2019. She is the president of the International Federation for Research on Women’s History, 2015–2020.



Ann Braude is director of the Women’s Studies in Religion Program and senior lecturer on American religious history at Harvard Divinity School. She is the author of Radical Spirits: Spiritualism and Women’s Rights in Nineteenth-Century America (2nd ed., 2001); Transforming the Faiths of Our Fathers: The Women Who Changed American Religion (2004); and Sisters and Saints: Women and American Religion (2nd ed., 2007). She is coeditor of Root of Bitterness: Documents of the Social History of American Women (1996).



(p. xii) Kathleen M. Brown is the David Boies Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia (1996) and Foul Bodies: Cleanliness in Early America (2009). Her current project is Undoing Slavery: Abolitionist Body Politics and the Argument over Humanity.



Patricia Cline Cohen is professor emerita of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of A Calculating People: The Spread of Numeracy in Early America (1983) and The Murder of Helen Jewett (1998). She is coauthor, with Timothy J. Gilfoyle and Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, of The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York (2008), and is coauthor of The American Promise (7th ed., 2017). She is currently studying the life of Mary Gove Nichols.



Tracey Deutsch is associate professor of history at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of Building a Housewife’s Paradise: Gender, Government, and American Grocery Stores in the Twentieth Century (2010) and numerous essays on gender, reproductive labor, and the politics of consumption. Her current research examines the politics of gourmet cooking through the lens of Julia Child’s biography.



Toby L. Ditz is professor of history at Johns Hopkins University. She is the author of Property and Kinship: Inheritance in Early Connecticut, 1750–1820 (1986) as well as numerous articles, including the award-winning Gender & History article “The New Men’s History and the Peculiar Absence of Gendered Power” (2004). She is currently writing a book on the culture of commerce and the history of masculinity in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world.



Ellen Carol DuBois is research professor emerita of history at University of California, Los Angeles. She has written Harriet Stanton Blatch and the Winning of Woman Suffrage (1997), Woman Suffrage and Women’s Rights: Essays (1997), and Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women’s Movement in America 1848–1869 (1978). She is the editor of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony: Correspondence, Writings, Speeches (1992) and Unequal Sisters: A Multicultural Reader in Women’s History (4th ed., 2007). She is the coauthor of Through Women’s Eyes: An American History with Documents (5th ed., 2018) and the coeditor of A Passionate Life: Writings by and of Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay (2017). In 2020, in connection with the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment, she will publish Suffrage: Women’s Long Road to the Ballot Box.



Marisa J. Fuentes is associate professor of women’s and gender studies and history at Rutgers University and holds the presidential term chair in African American History. She is the author of Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence and the Archive in the Urban British Caribbean (2016) and coeditor with Deborah Gray White of Scarlet and Black: Slavery and Dispossession in Rutgers History, Volume I (2016). She is currently working on a book that explores capitalism, the transatlantic slave trade and the disposability of black lives in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.



Marcia M. Gallo is associate professor of history at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She is the author of Different Daughters: A History of the Daughters of Bilitis and the Rise (p. xiii) of the Lesbian Rights Movement (2006) and “No One Helped”: Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy (2015). As the 2017–18 New York Public Library Martin Duberman Visiting Scholar she is researching the ways in which radical feminism influenced the LGBTQ movements of the late twentieth century.



Deena J. González is associate provost for faculty affairs and professor of Chicana/o studies at Loyola Marymount University. She is the author of Refusing the Favor: The Spanish-Mexican Women of Santa Fe, 1820–1880 (1999) and co-editor-in-chief of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas In the United States (2006) and The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in Contemporary Politics, Law, and Social Movements (2015). She is currently researching Spanish-Mexican women’s wills.



Dayo F. Gore is associate professor in the ethnic studies department and critical gender studies at the University of California, San Diego. She is the author of Radicalism at the Crossroads: African American Women Activists in the Cold War (2011), and coeditor of Want to Start a Revolution? Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle (2009). Her current research project focuses on African American women’s activism and travel across national boundaries.



Ellen Hartigan-O’Connor is associate professor of history at the University of California, Davis. She is the author of The Ties That Buy: Women and Commerce in Revolutionary America (2009) and coauthor of Global Americans (2017). Her current project, America under the Hammer, investigates gender and capitalism within a history of auctioning and market culture in early America.



Kate Haulman is associate professor of history at American University. She is the author of The Politics of Fashion in Eighteenth-Century America (2011) and coeditor, with Pamela Nadell, of Making Women’s Histories: Beyond National Perspectives (2013). She is currently working on The Long Life of Mary Washington, a biography and exploration of its subject’s “afterlife.”



M. Alison Kibler is professor of American studies and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Franklin & Marshall College. She is the author of Rank Ladies: Gender and Cultural Hierarchy in American Vaudeville (1999) and Censoring Racial Ridicule: Irish, Jewish, and African-American Struggles over Race and Representation (2015). She is currently working on Media Rights, which examines twentieth-century feminists and television reform.



Rebecca Kluchin is professor of history at California State University, Sacramento. She is the author of Fit to Be Tied: Sterilization and Reproductive Rights in America, 1950–1980 (2009). Her current project is Pregnancy and Personhood, a history of efforts to establish fetal personhood in America before and after Roe v. Wade.



Mary Ting Yi Lui is professor of American studies and history at Yale University. She is the author of The Chinatown Trunk Mystery: Murder, Miscegenation, and Other Dangerous Encounters in Turn-of-the-Century New York City (2005). She is currently (p. xiv) working on Making Model Minorities: Asian Americans, Race, and Citizenship in Cold War America at Home and Abroad.



Jen Manion is associate professor of history at Amherst College, author of Liberty’s Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America (2015), and coeditor of Taking Back the Academy: History of Activism, History as Activism (2004). Manion’s current project is Born in the Wrong Time: Transgender Archives and the History of Possibility, 1740–1890.



Lisa G. Materson is associate professor of history at the University of California, Davis. She is the author of For the Freedom of Her Race: Black Women and Electoral Politics in Illinois, 1877–1932 (2009). She is currently completing a political biography of Ruth Reynolds, a leading activist in the movement for Puerto Rico’s independence from the United States.



Michelle Nickerson is associate professor of history at Loyola University Chicago. She is the author of Mothers of Conservatism: Women and the Postwar Right (2012) and a coeditor of Sunbelt Rising: The Politics of Place, Space, and Region (2011). Her current project investigates the Camden 28 of the Catholic antiwar movement in 1971.



Lorena Oropeza is associate professor of US history at the University of California, Davis. She is the author of ¡Raza Sí! ¡Guerra No!: Chicano Protest and Patriotism during the Viet Nam War Era and coeditor, with Dionne Espinoza, of the collected writings of Chicana activist Enriqueta Vasquez. Her forthcoming book is The King of Adobe: Reies López Tijerina and His Worlds.



Nakia D. Parker is a doctoral candidate in the department of history at the University of Texas completing a dissertation on the forced migrations, resettlement patterns, and labor practices of people of African and black Indian descent enslaved in Choctaw and Chickasaw communities during the nineteenth century. She is the recipient of the Sara Jackson Graduate Student Award from the Western History Association and the C.M. Caldwell Memorial Award for Excellence in Historical Research from the Texas State Historical Association.



Sarah M. S. Pearsall is university senior lecturer in the history of early America and the Atlantic world, Faculty of History, and a fellow at Robinson College, Cambridge University. She is the author of Atlantic Families: Lives and Letters in the Later Eighteenth Century (2008). She is currently completing a book on the history of early American polygamy, forthcoming in 2019.



Hannah Rosen is associate professor of history and American studies at the College of William and Mary. She is the author of Terror in the Heart of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South (2009). She is currently researching African American experiences with death and burial in the nineteenth century and codirecting “The Celia Project: The History and Memory of Slavery and Sexual Violence,” a collaborative research endeavor.



(p. xv) Rickie Solinger is the author of multiple books on reproductive politics, welfare, motherhood, and incarceration, including Wake Up Little Susie: Single Pregnancy and Race before Roe v. Wade (1992), Beggars and Choosers: How the Politics of Choice Shapes Adoption, Abortion, and Welfare in the U.S. (2001), Pregnancy and Power: A Short History of Reproductive Politics in America (2005), and, with Loretta Ross, Reproductive Justice: An Introduction (2017). Her edited books include Interrupted Life: Experiences of Incarcerated Women in the United States (2010) and Reproductive States: Global Perspectives on the Invention and Implementation of Population Policy (2016). Solinger is currently working on an enthnohistory, My White Body.



Lara Vapnek is professor of history at St. John’s University. She is the author of Breadwinners: Working Women and Economic Independence, 1865–1920 (2009) and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn: Modern American Revolutionary (2015). Her current research examines the history of infant feeding and public health in New York City from the 1850s through the 1930s.



Margaret Washington is professor of history and American studies at Cornell University. She is the author of “A Peculiar People”: Slave Religion and Community-culture among the Gullahs (1988) and Sojourner Truth’s America (2009). She also edited The Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Bondwoman of Olden Times (1993). Her current book project is “Thine for the Oppressed”: Abolitionist Sisterhood and the Lincoln Era.



Rhonda Y. Williams is professor of history and John L. Seigenthaler Chair in American History at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women’s Struggles against Urban Inequality (2004) and Concrete Demands: The Search for Black Power in the 20th Century (2015). She is also coeditor of Teaching the American Civil Rights Movement.



Meghan K. Winchell is associate professor of history at Nebraska Wesleyan University. She is the author of Good Girls, Good Food, Good Fun: The Story of USO Hostesses during World War II (2008) and coeditor of Buffy in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching with the Vampire Slayer (2010). She taught gender history at the University of Tartu in Estonia as a Fulbright Scholar in 2011–12.



Judy Tzu-Chun Wu is professor and chair of Asian American studies at the University of California, Irvine. She is the author of Dr. Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity (2005), and Radicals on the Road: Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era (2013). Together with Gwendolyn Mink, she is writing a biography of Patsy Takemoto Mink, cosponsor of Title IX.



Serena R. Zabin is professor of history and director of American studies at Carleton College. She is the author of Dangerous Economies: Status and Commerce in British New York (2009) and The New York Conspiracy Trials of 1741: Daniel Horsmanden’s Journal of the Proceedings (2004). Her current project is An Intimate History of the Boston Massacre. (p. xvi)