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date: 22 August 2019

(p. lxxxix) List of Contributors

(p. lxxxix) List of Contributors

Helge Årsheim is Post-Doctoral Research Fellow with the “Good Protestant, Bad Religion? Formatting Religion in Modern Society” project (2014–18) at the Faculty of Theology at the University of Oslo. Previously, he was a PhD Fellow at the same institution, defending the dissertation “Lost in Translation? Religion-Making at Four UN Human Rights Committees, 1993–2013” in 2015.



Timm Betz is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Texas A&M University. Previously, he was a Rackham Predoctoral Fellow at the University of Michigan.



Niels Blokker is Professor of International Institutional Law (Schermers Chair) at the Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies, Law School, Leiden University.



Laurence Boisson de Chazournes is Professor of International Law and International Organization at the University of Geneva. She is an adviser to various international organizations (UN, ILO, WHO) and governments, and has held international assignments as counsel before the International Court of Justice and as arbitrator in, inter alia, investment and international arbitration.



Inken von Borzyskowski is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Florida State University. Previously, she was Postdoctoral Fellow at the Free University Berlin. She received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.



Gian Luca Burci is Adjunct Professor of International Law at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, and Senior Fellow of its Global Health Centre. Between 2005 and 2016, Mr. Burci was Legal Counsel of the World Health Organization. Prior to joining WHO, Mr. Burci served in the Office of the Legal Counsel of the UN. He held visiting professor positions at various universities, including the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, and the Georgetown University Law Center.



Andrew Cassels is a Senior Fellow in the Global Health Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies and formerly the Director of Strategy in the Office of the Director-General of the World Health Organization.



Simon Chesterman is Dean of the National University of Singapore Faculty of Law. He is also editor of the Asian Journal of International Law and Secretary-General (p. xc) of the Asian Society of International Law. Educated in Melbourne, Beijing, Amsterdam, and Oxford, Professor Chesterman’s teaching experience includes periods at Melbourne, Oxford, Southampton, Columbia, and Sciences Po. From 2006 until 2011, he was Global Professor and Director of the New York University School of Law Singapore Programme.



B. S. Chimni is Professor of International Law, School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University. He has served as Vice Chancellor of the West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences. He has been a visiting professor at Brown University and the University of Tokyo. He has also held visiting positions at Harvard, Cambridge, and York. He is an associate member of the Institut de Droit International.



James Cockayne is Head of Office at the UN for United Nations University. Previously, he was Co-Director of the Centre for Global Counterterrorism Cooperation, Senior Fellow at the International Peace Institute, and Principal Legal Officer in the Transnational Crime Unit of the Australian Attorney-General’s Department.



Jacob Katz Cogan is the Judge Joseph P. Kinneary Professor of Law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law. He was previously an attorney-adviser in the Office of the Legal Adviser at the US Department of State.



Jean-Marc Coicaud is Professor of Law and Global Affairs, and Director of the Division of Global Affairs, Rutgers University. He is also a Global Ethics Fellow with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Prior to joining Rutgers University, Professor Coicaud worked for the UN, including as a member of the speechwriting team of the UN Secretary-General. He is author of books and articles in political theory, international law, and international relations.



John R. Crook, an independent arbitrator, teaches international arbitration at George Washington University Law School. Previously, he was a Commissioner on the Eritrea-Ethiopia Claims Commission, General Counsel of the Multinational Force and Observers, and served for three decades in the Office of the Legal Adviser at the US Department of State. He is past vice-president of the American Society of International Law and a member of the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law.



Anjali Dayal is Assistant Professor of International Relations at Fordham University. She received her PhD in international relations from Georgetown University’s Department of Government in 2015.



Klaus Dingwerth is Assistant Professor of Political Theory of Global Governance at the School of Economics and Political Science, University of St. Gallen and a nonresidential Fellow of the Global Public Policy Institute in Berlin. Previously, he was a Research Fellow at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Potsdam and an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Bremen.



(p. xci) Jeffrey L. Dunoff is the Laura H. Carnell Professor of Law at Temple University Beasley School of Law. He has served as a Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School and the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, and as a Visiting Fellow at the University of Cambridge. Before joining the Temple faculty, Professor Dunoff clerked for a federal court judge and practiced law in Washington, DC, where he specialized in the representation of developing state governments.



Jeremy Farrall is a Fellow at the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy in the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs at the Australian National University. He is also Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Tasmania Faculty of Law. His books include United Nations Sanctions and the Rule of Law (Cambridge University Press, 2007), Sanctions, Accountability and Governance in a Globalised World (Cambridge University Press, 2009) and Strengthening the Rule of Law through the UN Security Council (Routledge, 2016).



Chiara Giorgetti is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Richmond School of Law, where she also serves as Faculty Director, LLM Program. Previously, she was an Associate in the International Arbitration Group, White & Case in Washington, DC and Lalive in Geneva. She clerked at the International Court of Justice and worked for several years at the UN. She is a graduate of Bologna University and holds a JSD and LLM from Yale Law School.



Madeleine Herren is a full Professor of Modern History and Director of the Institute for European Global Studies at the University of Basel. Previously, she co-directed, as full Professor of History, the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” at Heidelberg University.



Lise Morjé Howard is Associate Professor of Government at Georgetown University. Previously, she served as Senior Fellow at the US Institution of Peace, and Founding Director of the MA Program in Conflict Resolution at Georgetown University. She is the author of the award-winning book UN Peacekeeping in Civil Wars (Cambridge University Press, 2008).



Bjørn Høyland is Professor of Political Science at the University of Oslo. Having earned his PhD at the London School of Economics and Political Science, he was ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University College London before moving to Oslo.



Ian Hurd is Associate Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University where he is also the Director of the International Studies Program. He is the author of several books on the UN and international politics including After Anarchy: Legitimacy and Power in the UN Security Council (Princeton University Press, 2007) and International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice, 2nd ed. (Cambridge University Press, 2014). He has been a Visiting Fellow at the Woodrow (p. xcii) Wilson School at Princeton University, the WZB Berlin Social Sciences Center, Sciences Po, EHESS, the American Bar Foundation, and other institutions.



Ian Johnstone is Professor of International Law at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University. In 2013–15, he served as Academic Dean. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for International Cooperation, New York University. Prior to joining Fletcher, he was a political officer in the Executive Office of the Secretary-General of the UN. He is the author of The Power of Deliberation: International Law, Politics and Organizations (Oxford University Press, 2011) and the co-author with Simon Chesterman and David M. Malone of Law and Practice of the United Nations, 2nd ed. (Oxford University Press, 2016).



Margaret P. Karns is Professor Emerita of Political Science at the University of Dayton and Visiting Professor in the Department of Conflict Resolution, Global Governance, and Human Security at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. She is co-author with Karen A. Mingst and Kendall W. Stiles of International Organizations: The Politics and Processes of Global Governance, 3rd ed. (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2015) and with Karen A. Mingst and Alynna Lyon of The United Nations in the 21st Century, 5th ed. (Westview Press, 2017).



Georg Kell is the Executive Director of the UN Global Compact. Mr. Kell started his career as a Research Fellow in engineering at the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology and Innovation in Berlin. He joined the UN in 1987 and has led the organization’s private sector engagement, through the Global Compact and its related initiatives on investment and business education, the Principles for Responsible Investment and the Principles for Responsible Management Education.



Jan Klabbers is currently Academy Professor (Martti Ahtisaari Chair) at the University of Helsinki, on leave from his regular position as Professor of International Law at that same university. Previously, he taught at the University of Amsterdam.



Pierre Klein is Professor of International Law and Deputy Director of the Center of International Law, Université libre de Bruxelles. He co-authored with Philippe Sands the 5th and 6th editions of Bowett’s Law of International Institutions (Sweet & Maxwell, 2001 and 2009).



Mathias Koenig-Archibugi is Associate Professor of Global Politics at the London School of Economics and Political Science.



Barbara Koremenos is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan. Professor Koremenos focuses on how international law can be structured to make international cooperation most successful. She won a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for her interdisciplinary research and has published in both political science and law journals. She recently published The Continent of International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2016).



(p. xciii) Brian Langille is Professor of Law at the University of Toronto and has been Visiting Professor at the International Institute for Labour Studies (ILO, Geneva), the Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies, the University of Geneva, the European University Institute in Florence, the Centre for Transnational Legal Studies in London, and the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona. He was also, in 2011, the Innis Christie Visiting Professor in Labour and Employment Law at Dalhousie University, in 2012 a Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Nantes, France, in 2013 a Senior Fellow at Melbourne Law School, and in 2015 a Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.



David Le Blanc is an economist in the Division for Sustainable Development in the UN Secretariat in New York. Previously, he worked for the World Bank, as a researcher in CREST-Paris, and at the French National Institute of Statistics.



Peter L. Lindseth is Olimpiad S. Ioffe Professor of International and Comparative Law and Director of International Programs at the University of Connecticut School of Law. He has previously visited at the American Academy in Berlin, Columbia Law School, the European University Institute, Princeton University, and Yale Law School, among other institutions. His recent books include Power and Legitimacy: Reconciling Europe and the Nation-State (Oxford University Press, 2010) and, with Susan Rose-Ackerman, Comparative Administrative Law (Elgar, 2010).



Gil Loescher is Visiting Professor at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford and Professor Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author, co-author, and co-editor of numerous books on refugee policy including most recently UNHCR: The Politics and Practice of Refugee Protection, 2nd ed. (Routledge, 2012) and The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (Oxford University Press, 2014).



David M. Malone, a past Canadian Ambassador to the UN, is Rector of the United Nations University and Under-Secretary-General of the UN. He has published extensively on the UN Security Council, particularly on its decision-making, and also on development, the law and practice of the UN, Indian and US foreign policy, and diplomatic history.



Stephen Mathias is Assistant Secretary-General for Legal Affairs at the UN. Previously, he was an Assistant Legal Adviser in the Office of the Legal Adviser at the US Department of State and the General Counsel of the Multinational Force and Observers.



Walter Mattli is Professor of International Political Economy in the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of St. John’s College at Oxford. He joined Oxford in 2004 and previously taught at Columbia University. He has been a visiting Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin, the American Academy in Berlin, Princeton University, and other institutions.



(p. xciv) Rohinton P. Medhora is President of the Centre for International Governance Innovation, a nonpartisan think-tank located in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Previously, he was Vice President, Programs at Canada’s International Development Research Centre, a research funder, and on the faculty of the Department of Economics at the University of Toronto. He serves on the Boards of the Institute for New Economic Thinking and the Partnership for African Social and Governance Research.



Manuela Moschella is Associate Professor in International Political Economy at the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa and Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation. Previously, she was Assistant Professor at the University of Turin, Nino Andreatta Fellow at the University of Bologna, and Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Trento.



Milton Mueller is Professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology School of Public Policy. His research focuses on rights, institutions, and global governance in communication and information industries. He is the author of two seminal books on Internet governance, Ruling the Root (MIT Press, 2002) and Networks and States (MIT Press, 2010). In 1998–2015, he was Professor at the Syracuse University School of Information Studies. Mueller received his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School in 1989.



Patrizia Nanz is Scientific Director of the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) Potsdam and Professor of Transformative Sustainability Studies at the University Potsdam as well as Chair of the European Institute for Public Participation (EIPP). Since 2002 she holds a professorship in Political Theory at the University Bremen. Previously, she was head of the research area “Culture of Participation” at the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (KWI Essen), Senior Researcher at the Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster and the Max Planck Institute for Research on Common Goods, as well as Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study/Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin and the Department of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.



Stephen C. Nelson is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University.



Jed Odermatt is Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute.



Anne Peters is Director at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law and a Professor at Heidelberg University, Freie Universität Berlin, and the University of Basel. She has been a member of the European Commission for Democracy through Law (Venice Commission) for Germany (2011–15) and served as the President of the European Society of International Law (2010–12). Born in Berlin in 1964, Professor Peters studied in Wurzburg, Lausanne, Freiburg, and Harvard.



Jon Pevehouse is Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin.



(p. xcv) Touko Piiparinen is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Helsinki and a diplomat at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland. He has previously worked as a Research Fellow at the Finnish Institute of International Affairs and at the Centre of Excellence in Global Governance Research, Helsinki.



August Reinisch is Professor of International and European Law at the University of Vienna. He also serves as Head of its Section of International Law and International Relations and as Director of its LLM program in International Legal Studies.



Dan Sarooshi is Professor of Public International Law at the University of Oxford and a practicing Barrister at Essex Court Chambers, London.



David J. Scheffer is the Mayer Brown/Robert A. Helman Professor of Law and Director of the Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. Since January 2012 he also has been the UN Secretary-General’s Special Expert on UN Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials. Previously, he was US Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues (1997–2001). He authored award-winning All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals (Princeton University Press, 2012).



Frank Schimmelfennig is Professor of European Politics at the ETH Zurich Center for Comparative and International Studies.



Jan Aart Scholte is Faculty Professor in Peace and Development at the University of Gothenburg. Previously, he has held positions at the Universities of Warwick and Sussex, as well as the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague. His research covers globalization, governing global spaces, civil society in global politics, and global democracy. Projects have included “Civil Society and Global Finance,” “Building Global Democracy,” and “Structured Polycentrism in the Global Internet.”



Dinah Shelton is the emeritus Manatt/Ahn Professor of International Law at the George Washington University Law School. She was previously director of the doctoral program in human rights law at Notre Dame Law School. In 2010–14 she was a member of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, serving as its president in 2011. She is the author of three prize-winning books and numerous articles in the field of international law and is an honorary member of the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law.



Waheguru Pal Singh Sidhu is Non-Resident Senior Fellow for Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution. He is also a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Center on International Cooperation, New York University. Previously, he was Vice President of Programs at the East West Institute.



Michael Snyder most recently served as a Policy Analyst at the International Peace Institute. He has also worked at or consulted for several organizations, including World Learning, Freedom House, and the Center on International Cooperation, (p. xcvi) New York University. Previously, he interned in the Electoral Assistance Division of the UN Department of Political Affairs. He obtained his Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University.



Jonas Tallberg is Professor of Political Science at Stockholm University.



Ramesh Thakur is Professor in the Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University and editor-in-chief of Global Governance. Previously, he was Senior Vice-Rector of the United Nations University and UN Assistant Secretary-General, a Commissioner on the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty and a co-author of its report The Responsibility to Protect, Principal Writer of Kofi Annan’s second UN reform report in 2002, and Foundation Director of the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Waterloo, Canada.



Joel P. Trachtman is Professor of International Law at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University. Recent books include The Future of International Law: Global Government (Cambridge University Press, 2013); The International Law of Economic Migration: Toward the Fourth Freedom (Upjohn Institute, 2009); Ruling the World: Constitutionalism, International Law, and Global Governance (Cambridge University Press, 2009); and The Economic Structure of International Law (Harvard University Press, 2008).



Stadler Trengove is Senior Legal Officer, Office of the Legal Counsel, UN. His work at the UN has been in the area of peacekeeping, international tribunals, and constitutional and procedural questions as they relate to the principal and subsidiary organs of the UN. Mr. Trengove is a graduate of the University of Stellenbosch and the University of Oxford.



Santiago Villalpando is the Chief of the Treaty Section, UN Office of Legal Affairs (OLA). Previously, he served as Registrar of the UN Dispute Tribunal in New York, and worked at the OLA Codification Division, the International Court of Justice, and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. He is Adjunct Professor at the New York University School of Law and has taught in several universities, including Geneva and Leiden. A national of Argentina, he holds an Italian law degree and a PhD in International Law from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies.



Catherine Weaver is Associate Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and Co-Director of Innovations for Peace and Development at the University of Texas at Austin. Previously, she was Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas and Research Fellow at the Brookings Institution.



Thomas G. Weiss is Presidential Professor of Political Science at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Director Emeritus of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, and Research Professor at SOAS, University of London. (p. xcvii) He was President (2009–10) of the International Studies Association and recipient of its “IO Distinguished Scholar Award 2016.” He was also Research Director of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty.



Marc Weller is Professor of International Law and International Constitutional Studies at the University of Cambridge and was the Director of the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law. He also served as Senior Mediation Expert in the UN Secretariat and as legal advisor in a range of international peace negotiations. He is the editor of The Oxford Handbook of the Use of Force in International Law (Oxford University Press, 2015).



Ramses A. Wessel is Professor of International and European Law and Governance at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. Previously, he held positions at the Universities of Utrecht and Groningen. He is editor and founder of the International Organizations Law Review and has published widely on international organizations and on the relation between international and EU law.



Nigel D. White is Professor of Public International Law and Head of the Law School at the University of Nottingham. Previously, he was Professor of International Law and Dean of the Law Faculty at the University of Sheffield.



David A. Wirth is Professor of Law at Boston College Law School. Previously, he served as Attorney-Adviser for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs in the Office of the Legal Adviser at the US Department of State, Senior Attorney and Co-Director of the International Program at the Washington, DC office of the Natural Resources Defense Council, and law clerk to Judge William H. Timbers of US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.



Jan Wouters is Full Professor of International Law and the Law of International Organizations at the University of Leuven and Director of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, University of Leuven.



Dominik Zaum is a Research Dean and Professor of Governance, Conflict, and Security at the University of Reading. He was a Senior Research Fellow at the UK Department for International Development and Rose Research Fellow in International Relations at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford.



(p. xcviii)