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date: 08 December 2019

(p. 1033) Index

(p. 1033) Index

A
Abi-Saab, G. 161, 1015
Administrative law see Global administrative law (GAL)
Adorno, T. 969
Abicht, J.H. 75
Alexandrowicz, C.H. 32, 160
Allott, P. 6, 304
Althusser, L. 319–20
Álvarez, A. 158, 196, 294
Anand, RP 4, 32, 160–1, 164
Anghie, A. 33, 98, 296–7, 575, 594, 597
Anglia 377
Arendt, H. 16, 229, 231–56, 593, 794, 983–4
Aristotle 46, 285, 365
Austin, J. 160, 174, 422
B
Bartolus of Saxoferrato 47–8, 369, 376, 381
Baxi, U. 998–9
Bedjaoui, M. 32, 159–61, 321–2
Behaviouralism 434–9
Benhabib, S. 234, 248–52, 254, 256, 523, 916
Bhuta, N. 226–9
Bluntschli, J.K. 157, 588
Brittania 366
Broissard 374
Buchanan, A. 386, 390–1, 393, 403
C
Carty, A. 6, 293, 301–3, 966
Categorical imperative 505, 510–13, 764, 771
Charlesworth, H. 6, 163, 488, 493–4, 497, 595
Chernichenko, S.V. 268
Chimni, B.S. 6, 15, 322–5
China 138–154
human rights 138–9
impact of religion 151–4
inequality in treaty-making 574
international legalism 961–2
legal subject 141
recognition 588
semi-periphery in international law 297
sovereignty 144–51, 154
universalism 141–6, 152–4
Chinkin, C. 6, 163, 488, 493–4, 497, 595
Cicero 28, 42–5, 53, 69, 370
Civilizational approach
Christian 182, 575, 927
Hegel’s philosophy 587
liberal utopia 218
laws of war 775
Lorimer’s conception 133, 574–5
progress narrative 29, 940–1, 946, 989
Russian perspective 257–75
‘standard of civilization’ 33, 92, 126, 133, 297, 573, 576, 588–92
temporal concept 10
to China 124, 140, 146–52
to Ottoman Empire 132, 136–7
Western imperialism 89, 96, 98, 165, 323, 822, 1004
Classical approach
conception of international law 967, 976
cosmopolitan rejection 197
definition of natural law 45
global values 901
inter-war period 101–22,
interplay with positivism 55, 411–14
rule of law 837
sovereignty 569
turn to science 292
view of the past 26
Collective self-defence 662–9
Collectivism 506, 725–7, 734, 919
Colonialism see Imperialism
Commodity-form theory 315–19
Conceptualism 434–9, 443-50
Confucianism 140, 146–8, 152
Consent
basis for intervention 657
concept 1030
constraint on liberty 963
contrast with unilateralism 39
democratic consent 520, 540
ground of jurisdiction 605
limitation as basis for law 399, 401, 412, 551, 559
manifestation in treaties 181
presumed consent 114, 203
principle 1016
recognition 593
significance for positivism 176, 178–80, 413, 583
state consent as foundation of international law 459, 751–2, 970
voluntariness 67, 289
Constitutionalism 6, 15, 527, 644, 975, 1011–12, 1015–31
Constructivism
constitutionalization debate 1018
international criminal law 755
international organizations 631–2
Kelsen 201
moderate 347–54
neo-functionalism 631
‘norm cycle model’ 349–51
radical 354–9
Rawls 512
realism about international law 337
relationship to international 344–65
role of law 774
transnational legal process theory 520
twentieth century developments 295
Verdross 209
Contractual cosmopolitanism 514–18
Corporations 635–654
fragmentation of international law 1012
free trade agreements 733, 735
Haberler Report 730
human rights 650–3
international investment law 647–9
international personality 584
minimum wage payments 991
monopolies 717–18, 735
rising influence 566–7, 735
poverty 992
subjects of international law 265, 270
theorizing corporate analogues 644–6
Cosmopolitanism 6, 16, 180, 393, 413, 474, 477, 481, 505-25, 755, 846, 967, 981, 1018
Craven, M. 584
Crimes against humanity 251–4, 500, 502, 576, 593, 744, 766, 771, 850
Critchley, S. 602, 614–6
Critical Legal Studies 335, 346, 360
Critical theory 345, 400–2, 917, 970
Cushing, C. 123–5
D
D’Aspremont, J. 416–18
Delegation theory 630–1
Deliberative democracy 526–7, 532–42
Democracy 14, 482–3, 536–42, 593–4, 780, 915
Derrida, J. 206, 522
Diplomacy
casuistry 68
commercial diplomacy 701, 729
diplomatic practice as subject of theory 23-4, 28, 32, 42, 46, 48-50, 65, 69, 74–9, 81, 88, 96, 98, 131, 137
diplomatics 26, 48
encounter between China and the West 123–4, 134, 145–7, 149–51
immunity and inviolability 44, 65
(p. 1035) limitations of focus on diplomatic history 706–9
science of diplomacy 76, 79
Dominion see Sovereignty
Dualism 17, 55, 174, 204, 440
Du Bois, W. 1007–8
Dworkin, R. 335, 692
E
Elias, T.O. 4, 32, 160–1
Empiricism 4, 177
Engels, F. 309–12
Environmental law see International environmental law
Epistemology 12, 15, 140, 142, 153, 159, 165, 172, 195, 198, 199, 207, 254, 280, 300, 320, 328, 357, 393, 410, 416, 424–5, 525, 546, 688, 693–5, 700, 712, 743, 800, 862–3, 866, 881, 929, 956, 960, 998
Eslava, L. 297
Eurocentrism 32–3, 126, 139–40, 143–9, 167, 1009
Extraterritoriality see Territory
F
Family of nations
admission of Turkey 127
early twentieth-century positivism 176, 177, 180
Jewish question 250
jus gentium 32
new rights and duties 587
radical expansion in the membership 575
‘standard of civilization’ 573
statehood 565
Falk, R. 444–5, 451
Fanon, F. 594, 597–8
Fascism 229, 590, 724–6
Feminist approaches
diversity of visions 490–3
imperialism 164, 166
international personality 595–6
link with private international law 864
notions of justice 864
origins 488–9
paradoxes of feminist engagement 502–4
psychoanalytic theory 596
range of critical analyses 493–7
recognition of states 595–6
trajectories of reform projects 497–502
turn to history 6
TWAIL 595
ways of theorizing 12
Force
see also War
introductory remarks 656–9
legal justifications
significance 665–70
underlying rationale 659–65
purpose and place within international system 677–83
relationship of free trade with coercion 722–3
underlying assumptions that belie regulation 670–7
Foucault, M. 22, 35, 711–2, 926, 933–4, 937–8
Fragmentation of international law 705–7, 826, 888, 902–10, 970, 1011–14, 1020–8, 1014–15
Franck, T. 268, 353–4, 482–3, 677
Frankfurt School 5, 320, 961
Free trade 146, 312, 476, 701–37, 750, 815, 885, 887, 890, 894, 1027
Functionalism 620, 624–9, 632–4, 869, 879, 971, 976, 1018
G
Germany
constructivism 352
foundations of jurisdiction 608–9
(p. 1036) Grotius’ role as diplomat 86
‘Jewish Question’ 231
Nuremberg laws 246
positivism 180
rediscovery of natural law 200
Schmitt, C. 212–9
transformation of natural law 59–81
Global administrative law (GAL)
approach to legal pluralism 976
contributions to international legal theory 526–32
emphasis on transnational networks 262
relation to democracy 536–42
new vocabularies 12
realist perspectives 342
role of international organizations 621
Global values
constitutionalization debate 1018–19
cosmopolitanism 517–18
effects on China 149–51
failure of economic theory to address 461
international legalism 954–82
international organizations 633–4
liberal internationalism 471–83
link with private international law 863
migration governance 902–4
recurrently appearing theme 17
rise of non-state actors 566–7
rise of transnational capitalism 323–4
transnational migration 891–902, 911–19
Governance
colonial 799, 822
commercial 85, 99
concept 6, 17, 926
democratic 472, 483
economic 577, 718, 835, 881,
genealogy 375, 382
good 324, 833, 849, 889
imperial form 171
institutions 461, 474, 531, 536, 641, 827, 999
migration 889, 891, 897–902, 911–19
multilevel 1021–2
new 653, 821, 835
pragmatic approach 690–1
questions 820, 823–4, 828, 831, 876
reflexive 879
Russian tradition 262, 267
technologies 81, 170, 824, 835, 904, 1016
Gramsci, A. 319–320
Gundling, H. 65–6, 75
H
Haberler Report 730–1
Habermas, J. 352, 514, 516–7, 537, 969, 970, 972, 982, 1018–19
Hägerström, A 333, 419
Hanqin, X. 158
Hart, H.L.A. 16, 335, 387, 408–10, 414–26, 530, 557, 560
Hayek, F. 726–30
Hegel, G.W.F. 30, 75, 148, 194–5, 199, 267, 270, 303, 309, 575, 585–7, 589–90, 594, 598–9, 941, 978
Heidegger, M. 142–4, 216, 614–6, 809–10
Hermeneutics 303, 847–8, 933
Historical materialism 307–9
Hobbes, T. 16, 60–1, 73, 118, 285–8, 302–3, 331, 351, 353, 515, 802–3, 850, 961, 975, 977
Huber, M. 183, 990
Hoffmann, F. 685, 693–7
Horkheimer, M. 969
Hospitality 518–24
Humanism 3, 12, 39, 40, 42, 51–7, 101, 103, 107, 265, 367–9, 371–3, 376, 381, 492, 691, 693, 951
Humanitarianism
‘essentially contested concept’ 15
feminist approaches 496
history of international law 29
human rights pragmatism 692
(p. 1037) international humanitarian law 764, 773
manifestations of liberal internationalism 482
progress 940, 943
I
Idealism 17, 508–9
Ideology
‘Chinese world order’ 146
function of structural forces 959
ideology critique 319–21
international legalism 959
Nazism 210, 215, 217
‘Pure Theory of Law’ 193
Ignatieff, M. 685–90, 697
Immanence
Austrian school 184–90
early-twentieth-century positivism 179
innate cosmopolitanism 519
Kantian philosophy 520–1
practice-situated theory 403
progress 949
theory of sources 547
transitional justice 781
turn to history 802
Vitoria 282
Immigration see Transnational migration
Imperialism
see also Third World
colonial origins of international law 139
colonial origins of international environmental law 811–17
effects of decolonisation 159–62, 579–80
effects on China 149–51, 154
free trade 712–4, 719–21, 723–5,
liberal internationalism 481
Marxist accounts 312–15
poverty 1001–6
relation to theories of international law 155–71
transitional justice 796
turn to history 937–8
visual signs 372
Indeterminacy 221, 318, 333, 335, 363, 444–5, 476, 548, 557, 584, 857, 917, 973, 980, 1002, 1010
Individualism 112, 284–6, 289, 291, 293, 298, 300, 302, 506, 513, 520, 588, 640–1, 787, 848, 917, 965
Inter-state power
early-twentieth-century positivism 177
Kantian philosophy 509
migration governance 917
realism about international law 339–40
transformation of natural law 70–2
International criminal law
Arendt’s writings 233
capitalist exploitation 321
feminist approaches 500–2
focus on violence against women 498
identification of emerging norms 6
impact of natural law 81
Kantian cosmopolitanism 524
moral philosophy 392
progress in international law 944
theories of 738–761
International environmental law
colonial origins 811–817
focus on ‘nature’ 800–5
Romantic movement 806–11
managerialism 1027
moral philosophy 392
reformism and abolitionism 554
transitional justice 796
International human rights law
Arendt’s writings 233
association with justice
critical approaches 793–6
different levels of theorizing 781–7
transitional justice defined 788–92
‘business and human rights’ 650–3
China 138–9
feminist approaches 498–500
human rights pragmatism 686–700
identification of emerging norms 6
importance of moral philosophy 404–5
jurisdiction 603–7
Kantian cosmopolitanism 524
‘managerialism’ 1027
preeminent universalist political credo of late modernity 684–5
relationship with poverty 998–1008
transnational migration 914
International humanitarian law see War
(p. 1038) International investment law 165, 647–9, 1027
International law and development
background to IL involvement 820–1
conceptualization of law and development 826–36
defining ‘law’ and ‘development’ 836–42
Haberler Report 730–1
historical antecedents 822–6
liberal internationalism 479
Marxist theory 312, 323
sustainable development 799, 815–17
Third World issue 160
transitional justice 780
International legalism 954–84
International organizations
broader academic approaches 630–2
dealing with migration problems 913
development 825–7
earliest influences 621–4
‘fragmentation of international law’ 1012
functionalist approach
advantages and disadvantages 626–9
dominating influence 624–6
international personality 584
link with private international law 866
International personality
historical development 585–92
new approaches
feminist approaches 595–6
focus on statehood 597–8
Marxism 595–6
new tripartite standard 593–4
Third World Approaches 594
International politics 95, 204, 197, 288, 329, 881, 954–84
International signs law 365–84
see also War
Investment law see International investment law
Iusta exemplar 367
J
Jellinek, G. 174, 176, 194–6, 199, 202–3, 411
Jewish Question 237–42
Johns, F. 477
Joyce, R. 477
Jurisdiction
call to conscience 613–16
concept arising from kergyma 607–10
developments from early modern international law 611–13
extraterritoriality and the Ottoman Empire
debates before the courts 130–2
effects of ‘semi-civilization’ 132–6
importance 123–6
Turkey’s admission to the ‘family of nations’ 127–9
human rights 603–7
international organizations 622
key questions 601–2
meaning and scope 600–1
principles and categories 603
questions attaching to office holders 602
territoriality 602–3
Justi, J.H.G. 70–1
Justice
basis of critique 5, 16, 103, 901
criminal justice 739, 757, 759, 951
distributive justice 302, 397, 826
Eichmann in Jerusalem 251–3
global justice 354, 360, 364, 399, 487, 851
Grotian account 117
historicised 9, 29–30
humanistic value 101
ideal of international law 2, 95–6, 155–6, 957
Jewish question 236–240
Kant’s categorical imperative 510–13
liberal principle 472
link to peace 103, 108–9, 759–60, 967
link with private international law 864–5, 880
material justice 119–20, 601
metaphysical concept 337, 428
moral standard 392, 395
natural justice 111
natural law 284, 294, 298
negative justice 121
origins of moral philosophy 390
political question 824
progress narrative 944–6, 950
relation to human rights 102, 684–5, 693, 781–7, 793–6
relation to law 383, 600, 981
scholastic justice 62
social justice 826, 834, 841, 980
spiritual justice 608
substantive justice 200
transitional justice 225, 228, 779–96
TWAIL approach 164
universal justice
virtue 370-1
worldly justice 608
Justinian 28, 42, 46, 48, 49, 54, 368, 381
K
Kennedy, D. 6, 163, 258, 341, 346, 360, 362, 413, 685, 690–3, 697, 699, 855, 857, 860, 1001
Kerygma 601, 607–10, 615, 617
Khan, P. 222–5
Klabbers, J. 233, 982
Knop, K. 484
Kooijmans, P. 293–4
Korovin, Y.A. 264
Koselleck, R. 27, 30, 711–2
Kratochwil, F. 299, 344–6, 355, 357–9
Kunz, J.L. 193, 196, 198, 201, 206, 208–9, 340
L
Lasswell, H.D. 4, 430–3, 435–7, 448–9, 918
Lauterpacht, H. 57–8, 158, 193, 196, 198, 208, 291–2, 295, 329, 338–9, 342, 572, 575, 590–1, 725, 759, 772
Law of nature see Natural law
Legalism
challenge by policy-orientated international law 428
‘essentially contested concept’ 15
international legalism 954–84
liberal internationalism 471–487
liberal legalism 937, 961
moral philosophy 399–400
normative practice 402–4
relation to positivism 407–18, 425–6
sociological Hartianism 421–5
Legitimacy
moderate constructivist approaches 352–4
moral philosophy
conceptualization 399
origins 390
Lex insulae 372–9
Liberal cosmopolitanism 510–13
Liberal internationalism 471–487
Liberalism
embedding of neoliberalism 708–10
‘essentially contested concept’ 15
feminist approaches 491
history of free trade
international liberalism versus state planning 725–9
lack of attention to economic ordering 704–5
liberal internationalism 471–484
liberal legalism 961–71
link with private international law 864
Locke, J. 30, 140, 162, 351, 353, 803
Lorimer, J. 133, 137, 157, 297, 565, 573–5
M
Malthus, T.R. 715–17
(p. 1040) Managerialism
corporate characterization 641
empire building 971
‘essentially contested concept’ 15
fragmentation and constitutionalization 1027
human rights values 692
international investment law 648
responsibility to protect (R2P) 849–55
transnational migration 888, 899
Marks, S. 307, 320-1, 325, 483, 988, 999, 1002, 1005, 1009
Martens, F.F. 260
Marx, K. see Marxism
Marxism
accounts of imperialism 312–15
commodity-form theory 315–19
difficulties of defining ‘Marxist’ approach
historical materialism 307–9
ideology critique 319–21
international personality 595–6
primitive accumulation 311, 322
property 309–10, 316
reception in Third World 321–4
recognition of states 595–6
McDougal, M.S. 4, 16, 335–6, 428–33, 440–49, 480, 918
Metaphysics 25, 28, 144, 200, 208, 333, 419, 421, 519–20, 600, 611, 613, 617, 687
Miéville, C. 296, 317–9, 325-6, 484, 596
Minority treaties 231–2
Moderate scepticism 395–8
Morality
early-twentieth-century positivism 174, 178, 183
force and intervention 679
free trade 718, 730, 734
human rights pragmatism 684, 686–9, 692
international humanitarian law 764
Kant’s writings
categorical imperative 507, 510–13
cosmopolitan hospitality 518–24
critique of natural law 73
legal positivism 422, 426
liberal internationalism 478, 484
philosophy of international law
ability to think normatively 398–9
aims 391–2
applicable standards 393–4
conceptualization of legitimacy 399
critiques 394–8
international human rights 404–5
isolating and understanding legality 399–400
legality as normative practice 402–4
meta-theoretical question for a turn 400–2
origins 387–91
scope 392
Providentialism 715–17, 719, 734
Pufendorfian framework 64
realism about international law 341
revival of moral critique of war 776–7
Roman law 51
transnational migration 915–16
turn to history 7
Morgenthau, H. 16, 193, 218, 337–42, 434, 475, 478, 759, 977
Müllerson, R. 265–6
Myrdal, G. 466–9, 728
N
Naffine, N. 595
Natural law
association with international environmental law 800–5
grand école 11
impact of 16th century religious wars 60–3
impact of Martens 78
Kant’s critique of natural law 72–5
law of nature 75, 79-81, 285–9
linear and dialectical presentations 296–303
Malthus and population 715
new frame for utilitarian thinking 63–9
origin stories 281–2
rejection by positivists 58
(p. 1041) transformation in Germany 59-81
turn to history 290–6
Vitoria through Grotius 282–5
Neoliberalism 14, 161, 476, 485, 492, 495, 541, 708–10, 731, 733, 824, 828, 833–4
Neo-scholasticism 52
New Haven School 427–55
Nijman, J. 301–3, 593-4
Nouradoughian, G. 131–2
O
Onuf, N. 345–6, 355–7, 359
Onuma, Y. 33, 257–8
Ontology 12, 15, 139, 151–2, 157, 357, 359
Oppenheim, L. 174–84, 190, 203, 339, 408, 411, 565, 572–3, 575, 588, 663, 673–4
Orakhelashvili, A. 413–14
Orford, A. 477, 484, 497, 698, 860, 981, 1000
Ottoman Empire 123–37, 297, 574, 588
P
‘Pacific federation’ 514–18
Pahuja, S. 297, 477, 503
Pashukanis, E. 16, 315–9, 326, 596
Peters, A. 517
Pogge, T. 513, 985, 989, 998, 1003
Policy-orientated international law 434–44, 443–50, 480
Political economy 70–1, 465, 702, 704, 706, 710, 712, 714–6, 719, 720, 728, 735
Positivism 5, 11, 32, 41, 55, 58, 76–8, 173–91, 201–4, 407–26, 583, 965
Posner, E. 213, 220–1, 226, 955–8, 971, 977, 979
Postcolonialism 160–8, 317, 321–4, 839
Poverty 161, 457, 573, 715, 835, 906, 946, 985–1010
Practice
centrality to international law theory 1–4, 6–9, 12–15, 738–9, 743, 746–7, 751, 753, 756–7, 759, 821-32, 835-7, 839-843
role in sources theory 546, 552, 556–8, 560-3
state practice and use of force 656–9, 663–7, 673, 676, 680, 682–3
Pragmatism
early-twentieth-century positivism 175–6, 181, 190
foundationalism 686–690
human rights pragmatism 684–700
international organizations 630
Kant 508–9
New Haven school 428, 431–2, 434
pluralism 693–7
Primitive accumulation 311, 322
Private international law
competition based model 877–80
conflict based model 867–73
cooperation based model 875–7
focus on corporations 637
link with other theories 863–4
methodology 863
origins of extraterritoriality 127
overview 864–7
underlying difficulties 862–3
Private law analogy 145, 187–8
Progress
China’s encounter with nineteenth-century international law 153
development 829
effect of positivism 174, 258
free trade 718
human rights 689
Kant's writings 508, 512
liberal internationalism 477
narrative in international law 939–53
New International Economic Order 161
poverty 987, 989, 1003–4, 1009
secularism 929
theories of sources 554
transnational migration 884
turn to history 25, 33, 37
(p. 1042) Property
foreign owners 588
free trade debate 718, 728
in theories of statecraft 61–2, 66–7, 72, 77
indigenous property rights 860
intellectual property 166, 733, 828, 1000
investor rights 853, 996
liberal theory 472, 704
Malthusian defence 715
Marxist theories of private property 309–10, 316
Medieval law 49
place in theories of environmental law 799, 801–2, 825
private property 298, 728
relation to imperialism 166
relation to legal subjectivity 598
role in law and development theory 831, 833, 835, 837–8, 840
Salamanca school’s doctrine of private property 284, 932, 935–6
signs of 368, 372
theories of 67, 187
use of force to secure 679, 705, 709, 722
Przywara, E. 608-10
Pufendorf, S. 16, 27–8, 61–3, 65, 69, 76, 111, 113, 181, 286, 288–9, 291, 297, 299, 548, 573, 575
Q
Queer theories 491, 494, 595
R
Radical constructivism 354–9
Radical feminism 491–3
Radical scepticism 394–5
Rawls, J. 222, 390, 397, 511–3, 573
Realism 327–343
dangers of terminology 327–8
early-twentieth-century positivism 180
heritage of legal realism 331–6
realism about international law 336–42
realism as an argumentative strategy 328–31
relation to moral philosophy 386, 388, 390–1, 394, 398, 405
Realpolitik 177, 509, 917
Recognition of states
historical development 585–92
new approaches
feminist approaches 595–6
focus on statehood 597–8
Marxism 595–6
new tripartite standard 593–4
Third World Approaches 594
sovereignty 572–5
Religion 14, 923–38
see also Secularism
Arendt and the Jewish question 237–46
early-twentieth-century positivism 182–3
foundations of jurisdiction 607–10
Grotius and Christianity 96–7, 100
impact on China 151–4
international legalism 962
juridical theology 375
kerygma 601, 607–10, 615, 617
opening-up of non-European world 323
origins of environmental law 802–3, 809-10
Providentialism and political economy 715–17, 719, 734
revelation 50, 608–9, 612, 928, 934, 962
role of Christian confession in development of international law 932–7
Roman law 41, 46
School of Salamanca 16, 79, 281–91, 293, 295, 297–8, 300-1, 925–6, 930–7
turn to history 937–8
‘universal consciousness’ 938
Republicanism 74, 87, 94, 223, 250, 355, 520, 651, 1018
Responsibility 17, 169, 484, 489, 593, 605, 611, 749, 844–61
Right to have rights 231–2
Röpke, W. 727–9
Rorty, R. 685–690, 693–7, 982
Ross, A. 417–21
Rule of law
classicism 837
(p. 1043) development 828
part of new tripartite standard 593–4
recurrently appearing theme 17
transitional justice 785, 788
Russian theorizing 257–75
S
Salamanca School 16, 79, 281–91, 293, 295, 297–8, 300–1, 925–6, 930–7
Scelle, G. 104–5, 109, 196, 203
Scepticism
about global democratic institutions 533
about international law as law 387, 772
about moral philosophy 394–8
about New Haven school 430, 433, 440
about politics 958, 968
about progress narratives 946, 949
about regulatory interference with the market 841
about universalism 24
Arendt’s scepticism about rights 234, 250
Austrian scepticism 176, 190
effect of Wars of Religion 60
epistemological 956
Hague Peace Conference 89
moderate scepticism 395–8
ontological 957
postmodern 388
radical scepticism 394–5
realist scepticism about international law 955–6
rule scepticism 335, 339
Schmitt’s scepticism about liberalism
Schmitt, C. 16, 139, 210, 212–230, 338, 588, 742, 787, 955, 977–8
Selden, J. 365, 367–9, 372, 376, 378–80
Shklar, J. 229, 341, 689
School of Salamanca 930–2
Secularism 29, 83, 149, 803, 924–26, 929, 930, 937
see also Religion
Self-defence 68, 268, 584, 656–7, 661–3, 666–75, 680–2
Self-determination
Arendt’s theorising 244, 246, 248
basis for exclusion 914
facet of liberal internationalism 484
uneven realisation of principle 565, 570, 578–81, 591, 683
feminist approaches 494, 496
ideal 700, 1030
moral foundation for international law 390
Soviet program 264, 580–1, 591
subject of moral philosophy 392
Simpson, G. 506
Skouteris, T. 34–5
Smith, A. 70, 72, 712–14, 181
Solidarism 589, 593
Solidarity 106, 121, 176–7, 238, 240, 248, 290-1, 294, 493, 516, 590, 688, 695, 726, 981–2, 996, 1016, 1030
Soto, D., de 925, 932
Sources see Theory of sources
Sovereignty 14, 17, 564–5
authority, control and power 570–2
China 145–54
classicism 569
Eurocentric 144–145
images of 379-84
Jewish sovereignty 238, 241–4, 247–51, 256
Kelsen’s critique of German Staatswillenspositivismus 201–2
link with private international law 866
negative sovereignty 576–7
Ottoman Empire 132
Palestinian sovereignty 241
realism about international law 336–42
reformulation in late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries 578–9
role of international law 569–70
Sinocentric sovereignty 145–149
territoriality 578
transnational migration 914
Suárez, F. 283, 290, 292
(p. 1044) Staatswillenspositivismus 201–4
State responsibility 489, 605, 611, 749, 845–8
States and statehood 17, 564–5, 707-8
authority, control and power 570–2
civilizational approach to international law 257–75
diminishing importance 566–8
international personality 583–99
the Jewish Question 237–42
Kelsen’s critique of German Staatswillenspositivismus 201–4
movement from voluntarism and state-centrism 559–60
negative sovereignty 576–7
para-statism attributed to corporations 641–3
recognition 572–5, 585–92, 593–9
territoriality 577–82
transformation of natural law 60–3
Strauss, L. 216–8, 222, 229, 434
Structural approach 12, 15, 147, 203, 310, 319–20, 324-6, 410, 426, 432, 468, 489, 491, 493, 497–8, 502, 538, 541, 548, 592, 611, 614, 687, 689, 769, 794, 890, 901, 943, 959–60, 966, 973, 978–80, 998, 1000, 1003, 1027
T
Teubner, G. 999, 1024
Theory of sources 545–63
Third World Approaches (TWAIL)
development 825–26
historiography of modern international law 32–3
imperialism 157–172
international personality 594
liberal internationalism 481
reception of Marxism 321–4
recognition of states 594
Thomasius, C. 64–5, 75
Time
Biblical time and space 151–54
historical time 26–7, 30–1, 711–2
movement of concepts across time 703
progress and time 939, 941–2, 947
Tourme-Jouannet, E. 597–8
Trade see Free trade
Transitional justice 225, 228, 779–96
‘Transnational advocacy networks’ 349–50
Transnational migration
crisis and reconceptualization 882–6, 911–19
demand for more regulation 1014
fragmentation of international law 902–10
cosmopolitan hospitality 506, 514–5, 518, 521–3
global governance 897–902
political economy 719–20, 884, 889, 891–91
private international law 871
treatment of migrants 886–9
Treaties
Arendt’s minority treaty criticisms 242–6
contractual cosmopolitanism 514–18
unequal treaties 124, 135–6, 574
Ottoman capitulations 124–6, 129–32, 134–7
Roman law 43–4, 48–9
transformation of natural law 76–9
Triepel, H. 174, 196, 203, 411
Tunkin, G. 263
U
Universalism
Austrian school 184–90
behaviourist search for 435
challenge to voluntarism 5
encounter with China 141–6, 152–4
‘expansion’ of international law 33
(p. 1045) Kelsen’s modernism
contextual deep-structure of his approach 193–201
contribution to international law 210–11
limits of objectivity 204–7
post-war German acceptance 207–9
Koskenniemi’s approach 220, 696
natural law 286
private international law 875
ratification of the Geneva Conventions 764
relationship between law and ‘civilization’ 157
Russian international law theory 258
synthesis between law and politics 980–1
writings of Schmitt 218
V
Vattel, E., de 16, 28–9, 67–9, 101–22, 124, 155, 286, 288–91, 331, 338, 446, 548, 656, 664, 667, 678–9, 967
Veblen, T. 466, 468–9
Verdinglichung 173
Verdross, A. 104, 193, 196, 201, 203, 206, 208–9, 291, 293, 1016
Vermeule, A. 220–2
Vitoria, F., de 79, 155, 157, 167, 281–5, 290, 292, 299, 925, 932
Vollenhoven, C., van 101, 103–117, 120–22
von Martens, G.F. 23, 27, 76–9, 175
W
Waldron, J. 385, 472
War 763–80
feminist approaches 495–6
international criminal law 744, 749–50
laws of war 762–778
moral critique 776–7
moral philosophy 389
progress 946
rejection by internationalists 219
what the laws of war displace 775–6
transitional justice 794–5
underlying assumptions for use of force 675–6
Weber, M. 348, 822, 832, 856, 968, 971, 983
Westlake, J. 157, 297, 573, 578, 588
Westphalian sovereignty 170, 569, 961
Wittgenstein, L. 356, 358–9, 973
Wright, S. 6, 488, 494–8
Wolff, C. 28–9, 67, 70, 72, 75, 110–1, 113, 115–6, 118, 204, 331, 548
X
Xue, H. 159
Y
Yale’s policy science 427–55
Z
Zincgref, J.W. 382–4