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Alteration and Persistence: Form and Matter in the Physics and De Generatione et Corruptione  

S. Marc Cohen

Print publication date:
Aug 2012
Online publication date:
Nov 2012
Aristotle's Physics is a study of nature (phusis) and of natural objects (ta phusei). According to him, these objects—either all of them or at least some of them—are in motion. That is, ... More

Aristotle on Earlier Natural Science  

Edward Hussey

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Aug 2012
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Nov 2012
In the field of natural science, Aristotle recognizes as his forerunners a select group of theorists such as Heraclitus of Ephesus, Empedocles of Acragas, Anaxagoras of Clazomenae, and ... More

Atomism's Eleatic Roots  

David Sedley

Print publication date:
Oct 2008
Online publication date:
Sep 2009
Presocratic atomism was one of the most influential of the early theories: both Plato and Aristotle thought of it as a major competing theory, and it was an important source for ... More

The Cloud‐Astrophysics of Xenophanes and Ionian Material Monism  

Alexander P. D. Mourelatos

Print publication date:
Oct 2008
Online publication date:
Sep 2009
This article discusses Xenophanes' “cloud astro-physics”. It analyses and explains all heavenly and meteorological phenomena in terms of clouds. It provides a view of this newer Xenophanes, ... More

The Complexity of Aristotle's Study of Animals  

James G. Lennox

Print publication date:
Aug 2012
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Nov 2012
Aristotle is the first person in the history of science to see the study of nature as an articulated complex of interrelated, yet somewhat autonomous, investigations. Understanding why goes ... More

Leucippus's Atomism  

Daniel W. Graham

Print publication date:
Oct 2008
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Sep 2009
The founder of atomic theory, according to Aristotle and Theophrastus, is Leucippus. His very existence has been called into question. Three of the best minds of nineteenth-century ... More

Matter in Scientific Definitions in Aristotle  

Michail Peramatzis

Online publication date:
Apr 2014
This chapter distinguishes between the different types of definition discussed in Aristotle’sPosterior Analytics II.10 and argues that only some of them are, strictly speaking, scientific: ... More

Milesian Measures: Time, Space, and Matter  

Stephen A. White

Print publication date:
Oct 2008
Online publication date:
Sep 2009
Any attempt to trace the origin of Greek philosophy faces two complementary problems. One is the fact that evidence for the early philosophers is woefully meager. The other problem raises a ... More

Presocratic Cosmologies  

M. R. Wright

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Oct 2008
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Sep 2009
This article explores early Greeks' cosmological speculation, showing how they explored the possibility of a “theory of everything” and human understanding of the cosmos. In the exposition ... More

Reason, Cause, and Explanation in Presocratic Philosophy  

R. J. Hankinson

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Oct 2008
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Sep 2009
In the Archaic Geek world of epic poetry, the causes of things are shrouded in divine mystery; the gods intervene in human affairs, and bring about events, in a cruel and capricious ... More

The Role of Medicine in the Formation of Early Greek Thought  

Philip van der Eijk

Print publication date:
Oct 2008
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Sep 2009
The philosophical aspects of Greek medicine are now more widely appreciated, not only by historians of science and medicine but also by students of philosophy in a more narrow sense. There ... More

Science and Scientific Inquiry in Aristotle: A Platonic Provenance  

Robert Bolton

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Aug 2012
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Nov 2012
Aristotle's word for science is epistêmê, which has at least a dual use in the Greek of his day and is standardly used, in one way, as a count noun, to mean “a science.” Thus, in this ... More

Substances, Coincidentals, and Aristotle's Constituent Ontology  

Michael J. Loux

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Aug 2012
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Nov 2012
As Aristotle sees it, familiar sensible particulars give rise to a certain philosophical project, one common to his materialist predecessors, Parmenides, Plato, and Aristotle himself. The ... More

Teleological Causation  

David Charles

Print publication date:
Aug 2012
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Nov 2012
Aristotle introduces the fourth cause, the teleological cause, in Physics II 3, based on the idea of something's being for the sake of a goal: the good to be achieved. The goal causes an ... More

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