You are looking at  1-20 of 120 articles  for:

  • Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Archaeology x
Clear All

View:

Adult Appearances?: The Representation of Children and Childhood in Medieval Art  

Sophie Oosterwijk

Published in print:
May 2018
Published Online:
Jun 2018
It is often assumed that children do not really occur in medieval art. The problem for researchers is not so much one of finding representations of childhood, but of recognizing them. ... More

Agricultural Buildings  

Niall Brady

Published in print:
Jan 2018
Published Online:
Feb 2018
Despite the apparent wealth of information that exists on agricultural buildings and the implements used to help cultivate the land and manage the livestock, there is still great potential ... More

Anglo‐Saxon Archaeology and the Public  

Sonja Marzinzik

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article mentions certain aspects of the dynamic relationship between Anglo-Saxon archaeology and concentrates on the question of whether formal education has kept pace with these new ... More

Anglo‐Saxon Crafts  

Kevin Leahy

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article provides an overview of Anglo-Saxon crafts and refers to some of the issues involved. Lacking the screw thread, the Anglo-Saxon craftsmen would have made extensive use of ... More

Anglo‐Saxon Fields  

Susan Oosthuizen

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article addresses how and when the small, rectilinear or irregular fields of Roman Britain were transformed into the open and common fields of medieval England. Furthermore, the ... More

Anglo‐Saxon Migration and the Molecular Evidence  

Robert Hedges

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article discusses that there are many pitfalls in evaluating the significance and reliability of molecular data that are mainly due to the uncontrolled context in which past ... More

Anglo‐Saxon Timber Buildings and their Social Context  

Helena Hamerow

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
Despite the great progress made in the fifty years since Radford described the study of timber buildings as ‘one of the most intractable problems in the whole range of early medieval ... More

Anglo‐Scandinavian Identity  

Julian D. Richards

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article explores the circumstances that led to Scandinavian invaders being assimilated into Anglo-Saxon England and ensured that it was the Anglo-Saxons, not the Vikings, who came to ... More

Animal Husbandry  

Terry O'Connor

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article outlines the source material for an archaeological study of Anglo-Saxon animal husbandry, namely the excavated remains of the livestock themselves. Furthermore, the regional ... More

The Animal in Late Medieval Britain  

Louisa Gidney

Published in print:
Jan 2018
Published Online:
Feb 2018
Evidence is considered here for the utilization of domestic farm and companion animals for products other than meat, for example goat horns and calf and cat skins. Selection pressures ... More

Animals in urban life in Medieval to Early Modern England  

Terry O'Connor

Published in print:
Mar 2017
Published Online:
Apr 2017
Animals formed an essential part of urban life in England from Medieval times onwards, economically, socially, and ecologically. As livestock, they provided meat and other carcass ... More

Anthropology and Archaeology  

Chris Gosden

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
Cultural anthropology and archaeology are allied through common interests in materials, landscapes, and bodies. Both also link into broader forms of cultural theory which are described in ... More

Approaching Medieval Sacrality  

M. A. Hall

Published in print:
Jan 2018
Published Online:
Feb 2018
Creating, inviting, and repurposing sacrality was a fundamental quest of social behaviour in the medieval period. From the major shrines of cathedrals down to the portable sanctity of ... More

The Archaeobotany of Late Medieval Plant Remains: The Resource and the Research  

Lisa Moffett

Published in print:
Jan 2018
Published Online:
Feb 2018
This chapter considers the application of archaeobotany to the later medieval period in Britain with reference to selected sites. The strengths and weaknesses of methods and evidence are ... More

The Archaeology of Paganism  

Aleks Pluskowski

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article describes how the archaeology of early Anglo-Saxon religion can contribute to the understanding of variety within a pre-Christian world-view where many elements were shared by ... More

An Archaeology of Pilgrimage  

Peter Yeoman

Published in print:
Jan 2018
Published Online:
Feb 2018
An understanding of medieval pilgrimage can be informed by the application of archaeological approaches to the physical evidence. This chapter outlines the evidence of pilgrimage within ... More

The Archaeology of the Anglo‐Saxon Book  

Richard Gameson

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article discusses the range of different skills and techniques needed to produce Anglo-Saxon books. It also stresses the ways in which the processes of book-making, along with the ... More

Birth and Childhood  

Sally Crawford

Published in print:
Jan 2018
Published Online:
Feb 2018
This chapter provides a brief overview of the emergence of children and childhood as a subject for archaeological investigation, before outlining archaeological evidence for medieval birth ... More

Britons and Anglo‐Saxons  

Christopher Loveluck and Lloyd Laing

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
This article explores the evidence for contacts between different areas and population groups, as ‘trade’ is only one mode of achieving ‘exchange’, and cannot always be separated from the ... More

Burhs and Boroughs: Defended Places, Trade, and Towns. Plans, Defences, and Civic Features  

R. A. Hall

Published in print:
Mar 2011
Published Online:
Sep 2012
The term ‘Borough’ is derived from the Old English word burh/byrig, the basic meaning of which is ‘defended site’. It seems that although earthworks and Roman fortifications were places ... More

View: