Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 08 December 2019

Abstract and Keywords

For both adults and children who have significant hearing losses, hearing aids have long provided some support for hearing language and environmental sounds. However, they often are insufficient to allow persons with the most severe hearing losses access to spoken language. More recently, cochlear implants (CIs) have been developed to assist individuals who have severe and profound hearing losses. Initially developed primarily for use by adults with late-onset hearing loss, they are now widely used by children, even at the infant and toddler ages. Cochlear implants convert sound into electrical signals that are delivered directly to peripheral portions of the auditory nerve. In most cases, this increases the availability of spoken language and other sounds, lowering but not completely eliminating many of the barriers confronting persons with greater levels of hearing loss. A number of factors, including length of period of hearing loss before use, age of first use, and cognitive abilities, have been identified as predictors of outcomes from cochlear implantation.

Keywords: cochlear implant(s), language development, hearing technology, deaf, hard-of-hearing, hearing loss

Access to the complete content on Oxford Handbooks Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can''t find the answer there, please contact us.