Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 06 December 2019

Abstract and Keywords

This chapter draws on a range of disciplines including music developmental psychology, cultural psychology, ethnomusicology, archeology, aesthetics, and evolutionary theory to illustrate the ubiquitous nature of singing and song-making in human thought and activity. Invented song-making, a phenomenon that emerges in infancy between infant and carer, functions as a cultural tool in children’s engagement in social and cultural settings, plays a role in children’s early learning and development across many dimensions, and lays the foundations for musical parenting. This shared music-making underpins the emergence of children’s independent song-making. The chapter pursues these notions through five questions: What is young children’s invented song-making? When and how does singing and invented song-making emerge? What prompts and supports early singing and invented song-making? What function does early singing and invented song-making have in young children’s early learning and development? How might young children’s early singing and invented song-making be supported and developed?

Keywords: singing, early learning and development, independent song-making, invented song-making, musical parenting, shared music-making

Access to the complete content on Oxford Handbooks Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can''t find the answer there, please contact us.