Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 19 September 2019

Abstract and Keywords

The minimalist program includes the important conjecture that all (or most) properties of syntactic computation in natural language should be understood as arising from either (1) the interactions of independent mental systems; or (2) ‘general properties of organic systems’. The study of case morphology and the distribution of nominal expressions in the languages of the world is one of the areas in which generative syntax has made the most-profound advances over previous approaches. A large (and increasing) number of studies have identified patterns and principles of great generality – achievements that also shed light on other topics and puzzles. At the same time, it is fair to say that the phenomenon of case represents one of the more outstanding challenges for the minimalist conjecture. Though case is indeed an area in which complex phenomena can be predicted on the basis of more general principles, these principles themselves look quite specific to syntax and morphology, with little apparent connection to external cognitive systems. The discussion in this article reflects the provisional character of the investigation.

Keywords: minimalist program, syntactic computation, natural language, syntax, morphology

Access to the complete content on Oxford Handbooks Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can''t find the answer there, please contact us.