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date: 13 November 2019

Abstract and Keywords

Feminism occupies a rich and meaningful, albeit uncomfortable, history in Indigenous communities in the United States. This chapter examines that history in relation to the women’s suffrage and civil rights movements. It argues that in deflection and invitation of feminist politics during these movements, Indigenous scholars, activists, and artists (not necessarily mutually exclusive) demonstrate the primacy of sovereignty and self-determination in their understandings of how feminism is or is not relevant to them, clarifying the constitutive role of US imperialism, racism, and sexism in how feminism has been (dis)articulated. At the same time, it argues that Indigenous feminism has asserted the polity of the Indigenous: the unique governance, territory, and culture of an Indigenous people in a system of (non)human relationships and responsibilities to one another. In doing so, Indigenous feminisms rearticulate the futurity of indigeneity in political coalition with non-Indigenous peoples against the ongoing social forces of US imperialism, racism, and sexism.

Keywords: feminism, United States, Indigenous peoples, women, interpretive politics, suffrage, civil rights, gender, self-determination, racism

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