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date: 25 April 2019

(p. xv) Contributors

(p. xv) Contributors

Aarts



Bas Aarts is professor of English linguistics and director of the Survey of English Usage at University College London. His research interest is in the field of syntax, more specifically verbal syntax. Publications include English Syntax and Argumentation (Palgrave, 4th edn., 2013); Investigating Natural Language (with G. Nelson and S. Wallis; Benjamins, 2002); Fuzzy Grammar (edited with D. Denison, E. Keizer, and G. Popova; OUP, 2004); The Handbook of English Linguistics (edited with A. McMahon; Wiley-Blackwell, 2006); Syntactic Gradience (OUP, 2007); Oxford Modern English Grammar (OUP, 2011); and The Verb Phrase in English (CUP, 2013). He was coeditor of English Language and Linguistics (CUP) from 1997 to 2012 and is still its book review editor. b.aarts@ucl.ac.edu



Anderson



Wendy Anderson is lecturer in the English language at the University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Her research and teaching interests include semantics, metaphor, corpus linguistics, translation, and intercultural language education. She was formerly the research associate for the AHRC-funded Scottish Corpus of Texts and Speech and the Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing projects (www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk). She is the author of Exploring English with Online Corpora (with J. Corbett; Palgrave, 2009) and The Phraseology of Administrative French (Rodopi, 2006). Wendy.Anderson@glasgow.ac.uk



Ansaldo



Umberto Ansaldo is associate professor of linguistics at the University of Hong Kong. His interests include the study of East and Southeast Asian languages, contact linguistics, grammaticalization, and creolization theory. He is the author of Contact Languages: Ecology and Evolution in Asia (CUP, 2009) and is currently working on a book on simplicity and complexity in isolating tonal languages (OUP, in preparation). ansaldo@hku.hk



Archer



Dawn Archer is professor of pragmatics and corpus linguistics at the University of Central Lancashire, UK. She explores (changes to) the discursive practices of the English courtroom 1640–present and, in particular, the use made of verbal aggression. Archer's courtroom-based work is fed by her pragmatics research (historical and modern) and her work within corpus linguistics: she is involved in the development (p. xvi) of both content-analysis tools and corpus-annotation schemes for historical datasets. Her pragmatics-based publications include the Pragmatic Reader (edited with P. Grundy; Routledge, 2011) and Pragmatics: An Advanced Resource Book (with K. Aijmer and A. Wichmann; Routledge, 2012). Corpus-linguistic publications include What's in a Word-List? Investigating Word Frequency and Keyword Extraction (editor; Ashgate, 2009). dearcher@uclan.ac.uk



Baron



Naomi S. Baron is professor of linguistics and director of the Center for Teaching, Research, and Learning at American University in Washington, DC. Her research interests include the relationship between spoken and written language, the evolution of English (past, present, and future), the effects of technology on language, new media language, and differences between reading in hard copy versus onscreen. Her books include Computer Languages: A Guide for the Perplexed (Doubleday, 1986); Alphabet to Email: How Written English Evolved and Where It's Heading (Routledge, 2000); and Always On: Language in an Online and Mobile World (OUP, 2008). nbaron@american.edu



Beal



Joan Beal was educated at Newcastle University and is currently professor of English language at the University of Sheffield, UK. Her research interests are in two areas: the history of English in the Late Modern period (1700–1945) and dialect and identity in the north of England, but she often works on the interface between them. Her publications include English Pronunciation in the Eighteenth Century (Clarendon, 1999); English in Modern Times (Arnold, 2004); and An Introduction to Regional Englishes (Edinburgh University Press, 2011). j.c.beal@sheffield.ac.uk



Bermúdez-Otero



Ricardo Bermúdez-Otero is senior lecturer in linguistics and English language at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on the morphosyntax-phonology and phonology-phonetics interfaces, with particular attention to diachronic issues. He works predominantly on Germanic (especially Old, Middle, and Present-Day English) and Romance (Spanish, Catalan, and Portuguese). His publications include contributions to Optimality Theory and Language Change (Kluwer, 2003); The Handbook of English Linguistics (Blackwell, 2006); The Cambridge Handbook of Phonology (CUP, 2007); Deponency and Morphological Mismatches (OUP, 2007); Optimality-Theoretic Studies in Spanish Phonology (Benjamins, 2007); The Blackwell Companion to Phonology (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011); and Morphology and Its Interfaces (Benjamins, 2011). r.bermudez-otero@manchester.ac.uk



Biber



Douglas Biber is Regents’ Professor of English (applied linguistics) at Northern Arizona University. His research has focused on corpus linguistics, English (p. xvii) grammar, and register variation (in English and cross-linguistic; synchronic and diachronic). He has written 170 research articles and 13 books and monographs, including a textbook on Register, Genre, and Style (CUP, 2009), the coauthored Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English (with S. Johansson, G. Leech, S. Conrad, and E. Finegan; Longman, 1999), and other academic books published with Cambridge University Press (1988, 1995, 1998) and John Benjamins (2006, 2007). Douglas.Biber@nau.edu



Boberg



Charles Boberg is associate professor of linguistics at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where he teaches courses in sociolinguistics, dialectology, and historical linguistics. His research focuses on variation and change in Canadian English, including among ethnic groups in Montreal's English-speaking community, and on the phonological nativization of loan words in varieties of English. He is the author of The English Language in Canada: Status, History and Comparative Analysis (CUP, 2010) and a coauthor of The Atlas of North American English: Phonetics, Phonology and Sound Change (with W. Labov and S. Ash; Mouton de Gruyter, 2006). charles.boberg@mcgill.ca



Bowie



Jill Bowie is a research fellow at the Survey of English Usage, University College London. Her research interests include English syntax and morphology, language evolution and change, and the grammatical analysis of spoken discourse. She recently worked on the AHRC-funded project “The Changing Verb Phrase in Present-Day British English” led by Bas Aarts. Forthcoming publications (with B. Aarts and S. Wallis) include papers in The Verb Phrase in English: Investigating Language Change with Corpora (B. Aarts, J. Close, G. Leech, and S. Wallis, eds.) and Corpus Linguistics and the Development of English (M. Kytö, I. Taavitsainen, C. Claridge, and J. Smith, eds.). j.bowie@ucl.ac.uk



Broccias



Cristiano Broccias is associate professor of English language and linguistics at the Faculty of Modern Languages of the University of Genoa (Italy). His research focuses on cognitive theories of grammar, English syntax, and English phonology, both synchronic and diachronic. His publications include a monograph on English change constructions, The English Change Network: Forcing Changes into Schemas (Mouton de Gruyter, 2003), and various papers on simultaneity constructions, adverbs, and cognitive approaches to grammar. c.broccias@unige.it



Cameron



Deborah Cameron is professor of language and communication in the English Faculty of Oxford University. Her research interests include language, gender and sexuality, language ideologies, and the linguistic consequences of social change. She is the author of Verbal Hygiene (1995, new edition forthcoming in 2012); Language (p. xviii) and Sexuality (with D. Kulick, 2003); and On Language and Sexual Politics (2006). deborah.cameron@worc.ox.ac.uk



Claridge



Claudia Claridge is professor of English linguistics at the University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany. She has done research in Early Modern English (historical) pragmatics, text linguistics, and corpus linguistics. She is one of the compilers of the Lampeter Corpus of Early Modern English. She is the author of Multi-Word Verbs in Early Modern English (2000) and Hyperbole in English (2010). She has contributed to the De Gruyter handbook Corpus Linguistics (M. Kytö and A. Lüdeling, eds., 2008) and to the Handbook of Pragmatics: Historical Pragmatics (A. Jucker and I. Taavitsainen, eds., 2010). claudia.claridge@uni-due.de



Clendon



Alhana Rut. Clendon graduated with a degree in linguistics with first-class honors in 2009 from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Her special interests are syntax, phonetics, and phonology. She has done work with Ancient Greek syntax as part of her honors program. alhana@clendon.org.nz



Coleman



Julie Coleman is professor of English language at the University of Leicester, UK. Her research has largely focused on the history of English dictionaries and lexis, particularly with reference to slang. She has published four volumes of a History of Cant and Slang Dictionaries: Vol. 1, 1567–1784 (2004); Vol. 2, 1785–1858 (2004); Vol. 3, 1859–1936 (2009); and Vol. 4, 1937–1984 (2010). Her Life of Slang was published in 2012, and she has also contributed to the Oxford History of English Lexicography (2009) and to Oxford handbooks on lexicography and John Bunyan (both 2012). jmc21@le.ac.uk



Corrigan



Karen P. Corrigan is professor of linguistics and English language at Newcastle University, UK. She has researched historical and current language change in dialects of the British Isles with a particular focus on Northern Ireland and northeast England. She was principal investigator on the project that created the Newcastle Electronic Corpus of Tyneside English (2000–2005) and currently fulfills the same role for the Diachronic Electronic Corpus of Tyneside English (2010–2011). Her books include Creating and Digitizing Language Corpora, vols. 1 and 2 (with J. Beal and H. Moisl, 2007), and Irish English, Vol. 1, Northern Ireland (2010). k.p.corrigan@ncl.ac.uk



Crowley



Tony Crowley is Hartley Burr Alexander Chair in the Humanities at Scripps College and has conducted research in the fields of the politics of language; language and colonialism; language and identity; Liverpool English; and the history (p. xix) of English dictionaries. His books include Standard English and the Politics of Language, London (Palgrave, 2003) and Wars of Words: The Politics of Language in Ireland 1537–2004 (OUP, 2005). His most recent publications are ‘The Complaint Tradition’, Historical Linguistics of English: An International Handbook (A. Bergs and L. Brinton, eds.; De Gruyter Mouton, 2012); ‘James Joyce and Lexicography: “I Must Look That Word Up” ‘, Dictionaries 31 (2010); ‘ “Dissident”: An Essay in Historical Semiotics’, Critical Quarterly 53 (2011). tcrowley@scrippscollege.edu



Culpeper



Jonathan Culpeper is professor of English language and linguistics at Lancaster University, UK. His research spans pragmatics, stylistics, and the history of English and focuses on historical pragmatics. A major research project on historical spoken interaction resulted in the book Early Modern English Dialogues: Spoken Interaction as Writing (with M. Kytö; CUP, 2010). Currently he is working on historical aspects of English politeness, having coedited Historical (Im)Politeness Research (with D. Kádár; Lang, 2010) and play-texts, including Shakespeare's plays. He is coeditor in chief of the Journal of Pragmatics. j.culpeper@lancaster.ac.uk



Curzan



Anne Curzan is professor of English at the University of Michigan, where she also holds appointments in the Department of Linguistics and the School of Education. Her research interests include the history of the English language, language and gender, corpus-based approaches to historical sociolinguistics, and lexicography. She is the author of Gender Shifts in the History of English (2003) and coauthor of How English Works: A Linguistic Introduction (with M. Adams, 3rd edn., 2012). acurzan@umich.edu



Davies



Mark Davies is professor of linguistics at Brigham Young University, in Provo, UT. He is the creator of several corpora of English, including the 400-million-word Corpus of Historical American English (COHA) and the 425-million-word Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA), as well as historical corpora of other languages, such as the Corpus del Español and the Corpus do Português. His primary field of research has been historical change and genre-based variation in the syntax of English, Spanish, and Portuguese (primarily infinitival complements), but he has also authored frequency dictionaries of Spanish (2005), Portuguese (2007), and English (2009). mark_davies@byu.edu



Deumert



Ana Deumert is associate professor and head of the linguistics section at the University of Cape Town. She has worked, taught, and researched on three continents: Africa, Europe, and Australia. Her research program is located within the broad field of African sociolinguistics and has a strong interdisciplinary focus (with particular attention to anthropology, sociology, and economics). Her (p. xx) ongoing research focuses on multilingual mobile literacies, self, and sociability. Ana Deumert is editor of IMPACT: Studies in Language and Society (Benjamins) and a member of several editorial boards. ana.deumert@gmail.com



Dinkin



Aaron J. Dinkin is a visiting assistant professor in the linguistics department at Swarthmore College. His work focuses on dialectology and phonological variation in North America and the application of those topics to understanding the process of phonological change. He has done research on dialect regions including New England, Philadelphia, and especially New York State, the topic of his 2009 dissertation, Dialect Boundaries and Phonological Change in Upstate New York. dinkin@ling.upenn.edu



Dreschler



Gea Dreschler is a Ph.D. student in the Department of English at the Faculty of Arts of Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Her Ph.D. dissertation, ‘Passives and the Loss of Verb Second in English: A Study of Syntactic and Information-Structural Factors’, deals with the introduction of exceptional types of passives like the ECM passive John was alleged to be a liar and the prepositional passive This bench has been sat on. She has published an article about the topic-introducing function of the long passive in Early Modern English in Linguistics in the Netherlands 2010. g.dreschler@let.ru.nl



Farrelly



Michael Farrelly is lecturer in English language at the School of Arts and New Media, University of Hull, Scarborough Campus, UK. He has researched discourse in citizen participation, governance networks, and the global financial crisis. He has contributed to the fields of critical discourse analysis and cultural political economy. His published work includes ‘Critical Discourse Analysis in Political Studies’, Politics 30 (2010), and ‘Global Discourses of Democracy and an English City’, Journal of Language and Politics 7 (2008). He is currently working on a book, Discourse and Democracy, for publication in 2012 (Routledge). m.farrelly@hull.ac.uk



Fitzmaurice



Susan Fitzmaurice is professor and chair of English language at the University of Sheffield. Her principal research interest is the investigation of the history of English from historical sociolinguistic and historical pragmatic perspectives. She has done research on English in the eighteenth century and is now investigating English in colonial and postcolonial Zimbabwe. She contributed to the De Gruyter Mouton Handbook of Historical Pragmatics (A. Jucker and I. Taavitsainen, eds., 2010) and is coeditor of Methods in Historical Pragmatics (with I. Taavitsainen, 2007) and of Studies in the History of the English Language, Vol. 4, Empirical and (p. xxi) Analytical Advances in the Study of English Language Change (with D. Minkova, 2008). S.Fitzmaurice@sheffield.ac.uk



Gray



Bethany Gray is assistant professor in the TESL/applied linguistics program, Department of English, at Iowa State University. Her research investigates register variation through corpus linguistics. Recent work focuses on documenting synchronic variation across written academic registers and disciplines. Her collaborative efforts examine the differing grammatical complexities of spoken and written English and track historical change in scientific research writing through diachronic comparisons with other historical registers, with particular attention to the development of complex noun phrases in academic prose. She is author of several book chapters and research articles in journals such as Journal of English for Academic Purposes, English for Specific Purposes, TESOL Quarterly, and English Language and Linguistics. begray@iastate.edu



Gries



Stefan Th. Gries is professor of linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is a quantitative corpus linguist at the intersection of corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, and computational linguistics who uses a variety of statistical methods to investigate linguistic topics from the domains of morphophonology, syntax, the syntax-lexis interface, semantics, and corpus-linguistic methodology. He has recently written two textbooks on statistics (2009) and corpus linguistics with R (2009). stgries@linguistics.ucsb.edu



Haselow



Alexander Haselow is a research assistant in English linguistics at the University of Rostock. He has conducted research in diachronic typology, lexical typology, and the history of English morphology. He is currently working on the relation between information structure and the function of discourse markers in different languages, including studies on pragmatically determined changes in grammar. His most recent publications include the book Typological Changes in the Lexicon: Analytic Tendencies in English Noun Formation (De Gruyter Mouton, 2011) and several articles on the increasing use of final connectors in spoken English (e.g. ‘Discourse Marker and Modal Particle: The Pragmatic Functions of Final Then in Spoken English’, Journal of Pragmatics, 2011). alexander.haselow@uni-rostock.de



Hawkins



Jack Hawkins is professor of linguistics at the University of California–Davis and professor of English and applied linguistics at the University of Cambridge. He has broad and interdisciplinary interests and has published on language typology and universals, the relationship between performance and grammars, historical linguistics, second-language acquisition, and English and the Germanic-language (p. xxii) family. His most recent book-length projects are Criterial Features in L2 English (with L. Filipovic; CUP, 2011); Language and Music as Cognitive Systems (coedited with P. Rebuschat, M. Rohrmeier, and I. Cross; OUP, 2011); and Cross-Linguistic Variation and Efficiency (for OUP). jhawkins@ucdavis.edu



Hay



Jennifer Hay is professor of linguistics and director of the New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain, and Behaviour, at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. She has published four books: Causes and Consequences of Word Structure (2003); New Zealand English: Origins and Evolution (2004); Probabilistic Linguistics (edited, 2003); and New Zealand English (2008). She is currently associate editor of Language and of Journal of Phonetics. jen.hay@canterbury.ac.nz



Hickey



Raymond Hickey is professor of linguistics, Department of Anglophone Studies, University of Duisburg and Essen, Germany. His main research interests are varieties of English (especially Irish English), late modern English, and general questions of language change. Among his recent books are Motives for Language Change (CUP, 2003); Legacies of Colonial English (CUP, 2004); Dublin English: Evolution and Change (Benjamins, 2005); Irish English: History and Present-Day Forms (CUP, 2003); Eighteenth-Century English: Ideology and Change (CUP, 2010); Varieties of English in Writing (Benjamins, 2010); The Handbook of Language Contact (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010); The Dialects of Irish (De Gruyter Mouton, 2011); and Researching the Languages of Ireland (Uppsala University Press, 2011). raymond.hickey@uni-due.de



Hilpert



Martin Hilpert is junior fellow at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies. He has worked on grammatical phenomena in English, Swedish, and German. His research interests include corpus linguistics, construction grammar, grammaticalization, and cognitive linguistics. He is the author of Germanic Future Constructions (Benjamins, 2008). He is currently working on a book with the provisional title Constructional Change in English. martin.hilpert@frias.uni-freiburg.de



Hinterhölzl



Roland Hinterhölzl is professor of German linguistics at the University of Venice, Ca'Foscari. He has done research in comparative syntax, diachronic German syntax, prosody, and pragmatics. He has published a monograph on scrambling, remnant movement, and restructuring in West Germanic (OUP, 2006) and has coedited (with S. Petrova) a volume on information structure and language change (Mouton de Gruyter, 2009). He is currently working on issues of the interfaces between syntax, prosody, and information structure. His most recent publications include a paper on the development of V2 in Germanic (Lingua 120, 2011) and a (p. xxiii) comparative study of word-order regularities in German and English (Syntax 12, 2009). rolandh@unive.it



Honeybone



Patrick Honeybone is senior lecturer in linguistics and English language at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. His main research interests are in historical and theoretical phonology and in the English of the north of England. He has published widely on these topics, including a history of the concept of lenition, descriptions of the phonology and history of Liverpool English, and work on the history of the laryngeal phonology of English. He has coedited ‘Linguistic Knowledge’ (with R. Bermúdez-Otero; special issue of Lingua, 2006) and ‘Issues in English Phonology’ (with P. Carr; special issue of Language Sciences, 2007) and is currently coediting the Oxford Handbook of Historical Phonology (with J. Salmons). patrick.honeybone@ed.ac.uk



Horobin



Simon Horobin is professor of English language and literature at the University of Oxford and a fellow of Magdalen College. He has published widely on the English language in the medieval period. His publications include The Language of the Chaucer Tradition (2003); Chaucer's Language (2006); Studying the History of Early English (2009); and An Introduction to Middle English (with J. Smith, 2002). He is coeditor of New Perspectives on English Historical Linguistics, Vol. 1, Syntax and Morphology (with C. Kay and J. Smith, 2004). Current projects include an edition of Osbern Bokenham's Legenda Aurea and a monograph on the manuscripts of Piers Plowman. simon.horobin@magd.ox.ac.uk



Hough



Carole Hough is professor of onomastics at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. She has published extensively on English historical linguistics, manuscript studies, Old English, and onomastics. Recent books and edited volumes include Beginning Old English (with J. Corbett, 2007); Cultural Contacts in the North Atlantic Region (with P. Gammeltoft and D. Waugh, 2005); and New Directions in Colour Studies (with C. Biggam, C. Kay, and D. Simmons, 2011). She has contributed to The Oxford History of English Lexicography (A. Cowie, ed., 2009) and Writing and Texts in Anglo-Saxon England (A. Rumble, ed., 2006). carole.hough@glasgow.ac.uk



Hughes



Geoffrey Hughes graduated from Oxford University, is emeritus professor of the history of the English language at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and is currently honorary research associate at the University of Cape Town. His primary research interests are historical semantics, sociolinguistics, lexical change, and the literary exploitation of the resources of the language. His principal publications are Words in Time: A Social History of (p. xxiv) the English Vocabulary (1988); Swearing (1998); An Encyclopedia of Swearing (2006); and Political Correctness: A History of Semantics and Culture (2009). hughes_geoffrey@hotmail.com



Hundt



Marianne Hundt is professor of English linguistics at the University of Zurich. Her research interests are variation and change in contemporary and late Modern English, especially grammatical change. She has also done research on varieties of English as a first language, second-language varieties of English (especially in Fiji and South Asia), and language in the Indian diaspora. She has been involved in the compilation of various electronic corpora: FLOB, Frown, B-Brown, ICE-Fiji, ARCHER, and a corpus of early New Zealand texts. Recent publications include Change in Contemporary English: A Grammatical Study (with G. Leech, C. Mair, and N. Smith; CUP, 2009), Exploring Second-Language Varieties of English and Learner Englishes (edited with J. Mukherjee; Benjamins, 2011), and Mapping Unity and Diversity World-Wide (edited with U. Gut; Benjamins, 2012). m.hundt@es.uzh.ch



Jucker



Andreas H. Jucker is professor of English linguistics at the University of Zurich, where he is also vice dean for resources of the Faculty of Arts. Previously he taught at the Justus Liebig University, Giessen. His current research interests include historical pragmatics, speech-act theory, politeness theory, and the grammar and history of English. His recent publications include the Handbook of Historical Pragmatics (edited with I. Taavitsainen; De Gruyter Mouton, 2010). He is editor of the Journal of Historical Pragmatics (with I. Taavitsainen) and associate editor of the Pragmatics & Beyond New Series (Benjamins). ahjucker@es.uzh.ch



Kemenade



Ans van Kemenade is professor of English linguistics at Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The focus of her research is on English historical syntax in its West-Germanic context. She is currently working on a series of articles on the diachrony of English clause structure in its discourse context. She has edited the Blackwell Handbook of the History of English (with B. Los; 2006). Her books include Syntactic Case and Morphological Case in the History of English (1987) and The Syntax of Early English (with O. Fischer, W. Koopman, and W. van der Wurff, 2000). A.v.Kemenade@let.ru.nl



Kohnen



Thomas Kohnen is professor of English language and medieval studies at the University of Cologne. His major fields of study include historical pragmatics and historical text linguistics, corpus linguistics, historical syntax, speech-act theory, orality and literacy, and the language of religion. He is coeditor of the book series English Corpus Linguistics. He is also in charge of the Corpus of English (p. xxv) Religious Prose (COERP), which is being compiled at the English Department of the University of Cologne. His recent publications include studies on politeness, religious discourse, and English Bible translations. Thomas.Kohnen@uni-koeln.de



Komen



Erwin R. Komen is a Ph.D. candidate at the Radboud University Nijmegen and a linguistics consultant at SIL-International. His research interests are broad, ranging from language description (Chechen) to diachronic work (how information status and syntax interact in the expression of focus). He developed Cesax, a computer program to resolve coreference semiautomatically, which is used to enrich existing diachronic corpora with coreference information, and CorpusStudio, a program to streamline hierarchical querying of treebank corpora. His Ph.D. research into the cleft construction in English and Chechen combines many of these interests. E. Komen@let.ru.nl



Kortmann



Bernd Kortmann is professor of English language and linguistics at the University of Freiburg, Germany. Publications include about 90 research articles and reviews, four monographs, five edited volumes (including Linguistic Complexity, with B. Szmrecsanyi, 2012), two handbooks (recently The Languages and Linguistics of Europe, with J. van der Auwera, 2011), and the open-access resource electronic World Atlas of Varieties of English (eWAVE) with K. Lunkenheimer, to be complemented by a print version in autumn 2012. Kortmann is coeditor of Topics in English Linguistics and Dialects of English (both De Gruyter Mouton), an editor of English Language and Linguistics, and a member of the editorial boards of English Today and Transactions of the Philological Society. bernd.kortmann@anglistik.uni-freiburg.de



Kretzschmar



William A. Kretzschmar Jr. teaches English and linguistics as Harry and Jane Willson Professor in Humanities at the University of Georgia. He manages the American Linguistic Atlas Project, the oldest and largest national research project to survey how people speak English in the country. His major publications include The Linguistics of Speech (CUP, 2009); the Oxford Dictionary of Pronunciation for Current English (with C. Upton and R. Konopka; OUP, 2001); Introduction to Quantitative Analysis of Linguistic Survey Data (with E. Schneider; Sage, 1996); and Handbook of the Linguistic Atlas of the Middle and South Atlantic States (with V. McDavid, Th. Lerud, and E. Johnson; Chicago, 1993). kretsch@uga.edu



Kytö



Merja Kytö is professor of English language at Uppsala University, Sweden. Her fields of interest include the history of English, variation analysis, historical pragmatics, and corpus linguistics. She coauthored Early Modern English Dialogues: Spoken Interaction as Writing (with J. Culpeper; 2010). Among her other recent publications are Records of the Salem Witch-Hunt (associate editor, (p. xxvi) 2009); Corpus Linguistics: An International Handbook (coeditor with A. Lüdeling, 2008); and Nineteenth-Century English: Stability and Change (coeditor with M. Rydén and E. Smitterberg, 2006). She has participated in the compilation of historical corpora, among them the Helsinki Corpus of English Texts, A Corpus of Nineteenth-Century English, and A Corpus of English Dialogues 1560–1760. merja.kyto@engelska.uu.se



Laitinen



Mikko Laitinen obtained his doctorate from the University of Helsinki and has worked as a researcher at the University of Jyväskylä and in the Research Unit for Variation, Contacts, and Change in English. He was appointed professor of English linguistics at Linnaeus University in Sweden in 2012. His research interests include quantitative approaches to English as a lingua franca from a diachronic perspective, variationist sociolinguistics, linguistic diversity in early nineteenth-century vernacular writing, and the study of multimodal public signage. He is the author of Agreement Patterns in English (2007) and one the coauthors of National Survey on the English Language in Finland: Uses, Meanings and Attitudes (2011). mikko.laitinen@helsinki.fi/miklaiti@campus.jyu.fi



Leech



Geoffrey Leech is emeritus professor of linguistics and English language at Lancaster University, UK. He has done research in corpus linguistics, English grammar, stylistics, semantics, and pragmatics. His books include Principles of Pragmatics (1983); A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (with R. Quirk, S. Greenbaum, and J. Svartvik, 1985); Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English (with D. Biber, S. Johansson, S. Conrad, and E. Finegan, 1999); Meaning and the English Verb (3rd edn., 2004); and Change in Contemporary English: A Grammatical Study (with M. Hundt, C. Mair, and N. Smith, 2009). g.leech@lancaster.ac.uk



Lim



Lisa Lim is assistant professor and coordinator of the Language and Communication Programme in the School of English at the University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include New Englishes, especially postcolonial Asian varieties in multilingual ecologies, with particular focus on contact dynamics, involving both sociohistorical and linguistic investigation. Lim also studies language choice, shift, and identity in minority/diasporic Malay-speaking communities, such as the Peranakans. Some of her (edited) volumes include The Typology of Asian Englishes (English World-Wide 30; Benjamins, 2011) and English in Singapore (HKUP, 2010). She is currently coauthoring (with U. Ansaldo) Languages in Contact for CUP. lisa.ls.lim@gmail.com



Los



Bettelou Los is senior lecturer in English at the Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. She graduated from the University of Amsterdam in 1986 and has since held teaching and research positions at the University of Amsterdam, the (p. xxvii) Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (where she obtained her doctorate in 2000), and other colleges of higher education. She has published The Rise of the To-Infinitive (OUP, 2005). She has edited, with Ans van Kemenade, The Handbook of the History of English (Blackwell, 2006) and coauthored Morphosyntactic Change: A Comparative Study of Particles and Prefixes (CUP, 2012). Her research interests are diachronic syntax, the history of English, and the role of information structure in syntactic change. b.los@let.ru.nl



Lutz



Angelika Lutz is professor of English philology at the University of Erlangen, Germany. She has published in various fields of historical linguistics, especially phonology, morphology, and lexicology, frequently with emphasis on questions of language contact. Her publications on language contact include ‘Sound Change, Word Formation, and the Lexicon’ (English Studies, 1997); ‘When Did English Begin?’ (T. Fanego, B. Méndez-Naya, and E. Seoane, eds., Sounds, Words, Texts, and Change, 2002); ‘Types and Degrees of Mixing’ (Interdisciplinary Journal for Germanic Linguistics and Semiotic Analysis 13, 2008); ‘Word Accent Position and Language Contact in English and German’ (Anglia, 2009); and ‘Celtic Influence on Old English and West Germanic’ (M. Filppula and J. Klemola, eds., Re-Evaluating the Celtic Hypothesis, 2009). Angelika.Lutz@angl.phil.uni-erlangen.de



Machan



Tim William Machan is professor of English at Marquette University, where he teaches and has published extensively on historical English linguistics, medieval manuscript culture, and Old Norse. His most recent book is Language Anxiety: Conflict and Change in the History of English (OUP, 2009). His What Is English, and Why Do We Care? is forthcoming from OUP in 2013. tim.machan@marquette.edu



Mair



Christian Mair holds a chair in English linguistics at the University of Freiburg in Germany. He has been involved in the compilation of several linguistic corpora (among them F-LOB and Frown, updates of the classic LOB and Brown corpora, and the Jamaican component of the International Corpus of English). His research over the past two decades has focused on the corpus-based description of modern English grammar and variation and change in standard Englishes worldwide. His most recent books are Twentieth-Century English: History, Variation, and Standardization (2006) and Change in Contemporary English: A Grammatical Study (with G. Leech, M. Hundt, and N. Smith, 2009). christian.mair@anglistik.uni-freiburg.de



Mesthrie



Rajend Mesthrie is professor of linguistics in the School of African and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Linguistics at the University of Cape Town, where he teaches sociolinguistics, especially language contact and variation. He holds a research chair in migration, language, and social change. His books include Introducing Sociolinguistics (with J. Swann, A. Deumert, and W. Leap; Edinburgh UP, 2nd edn., (p. xxviii) 2009); World Englishes (with R. Bhatt; CUP, 2008); A Dictionary of South African Indian English (UCT Press, 2010); and the edited collections Language in South Africa (CUP, 2002) and A Concise Encyclopedia of Sociolinguistics (Pergamon, 2001). His current research focuses on the social dialectology of South African English with reference to accelerated postapartheid social changes. Rajend.Mesthrie@uct.ac.za



Montgomery



Chris Montgomery is lecturer in the English language at Sheffield Hallam University. His research interests include the perception of dialectal variation in the United Kingdom, with a special focus on the north of England. He is involved in developing new methods for gathering and processing data in the field of perceptual dialectology and is currently exploring the possibilities presented by online fieldwork. His recent published work includes chapters on perceptual dialectology methods and findings in Language and Space: An International Handbook of Linguistic Variation (A. Lameli, R. Kehrein, and S. Rabanus, eds., 2010) and Analysing Variation in English (W. Maguire and A. McMahon, eds., 2011). c.montgomery@shu.ac.uk



Mukherjee



Joybrato Mukherjee is professor of English linguistics at Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. His research interests include corpus linguistics (including teaching applications), English syntax (with a focus on lexicogrammar), and varieties of English (with a special emphasis on English in South Asia). He is the coordinator of various corpus-compilation projects (e.g. the Sri Lankan component of the International Corpus of English). His book publications include English Ditransitive Verbs (2005) and Exploring Second-Language Varieties of English and Learner Englishes (coedited with M. Hundt, 2011); his numerous articles include contributions to various handbooks such as the Routledge Handbook of World Englishes (A. Kirkpatrick, ed., 2010). Mukherjee@uni-giessen.de



Nevala



Minna Nevala is currently adjunct professor at the Department of Modern Languages, University of Helsinki. Her research interests include historical sociolinguistics, historical pragmatics, and politeness studies. She is one of the compilers of the Corpora of Early English Correspondence (CEEC-400). Her publications include Address in Early English Correspondence: Its Forms and Socio-Pragmatic Functions (Société Néophilologique de Helsinki, 2004) and the jointly edited Social Roles and Language Practices in Late Modern English (with P. Pahta, M. Palander-Collin, and A. Nurmi; Benjamins, 2010). aunio@mappi.helsinki.fi



Nevalainen



Terttu Nevalainen is professor of English philology and Academy Professor at the University of Helsinki, Finland. Her research interests are historical sociolinguistics, variation studies, and corpus linguistics. She is one of compilers of the Helsinki (p. xxix) Corpus of English Texts and the Corpus of Early English Correspondence. Her publications include more than 100 scholarly articles, An Introduction to Early Modern English (2006), and Historical Sociolinguistics (with H. Raumolin-Brunberg, 2003), and she has coedited volumes on historical sociolinguistics, linguistic variation, and letter writing. She is the English editor of Neuphilologische Mitteilungen and the editor in chief of the e-series Studies in Variation, Contacts, and Change in English and of the Oxford Studies in the History of English. terttu.nevalainen@helsinki.fi



Pahta



Päivi Pahta is professor of English philology at the University of Tampere, Finland. Much of her research deals with the history of scientific and medical writing, language contact, and multilingualism evidenced in medieval manuscripts and historical corpora. Her recent publications include the coedited books Social Roles and Language Practices in Late Modern English (with M. Palander-Collin, M. Nevala, and A. Nurmi, 2010); Communicating Early English Manuscripts (with A. Jucker, 2011); and Medical Writing in Early Modern English (with I. Taavitsainen, 2011). She is also a cocompiler of the historical corpora MEMT (2005) and EMEMT (2010) (see list of corpora and databases). Paivi.Pahta@uta.fi



Palander-Collin



Minna Palander-Collin is currently professor of English philology and head of the English Unit in the Department of Modern Languages at the University of Helsinki. She is also senior researcher at the Research Unit for Variation, Contacts, and Change in English (VARIENG), University of Helsinki. Her research interests include historical sociolinguistics, pragmatics, and corpus linguistics. She has coedited The Language of Daily Life in England (1400–1800) (with A. Nurmi and M. Nevala; Benjamins, 2009) and Social Roles and Language Practices in Late Modern English (with P. Pahta, M. Nevala, and A. Nurmi; Benjamins, 2010). She is also one of the compilers of the Corpus of Early English Correspondence. minna.palander-collin@helsinki.fi



Percy



Carol Percy is associate professor of English at the University of Toronto, where she teaches courses on literature and language and is writing a cultural history of later modern English grammar(s). She has contributed to Eighteenth-Century English: Ideology and Change (R. Hickey, ed.; CUP, 2010); Social Roles and Language Practices in Late Modern English (P. Pahta, A. Nurmi, and M. Palander-Collin, eds.; Benjamins, 2010); Educating the Child in Enlightenment Britain (M. Hilton and J. Shefrin, eds.; Ashgate, 2009); and Grammars, Grammarians, and Grammar-Writing in Eighteenth-Century England (I. Tieken-Boon van Ostade, ed.; Mouton de Gruyter, 2008). carol.percy@utoronto.ca



(p. xxx) Petrova



Svetlana Petrova is professor of historical linguistics at Bergische Universität Wuppertal and principal investigator of a research project with the Collaborative Research Center on Information Structure, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Her main interests include the syntax and semantics of referring expressions in the history of German and word order variation and change in Germanic. She is author of several publications on the interaction of word order and information structure in Early Germanic, including the first theoretically based book-length investigation on the syntax of Middle Low German, and co-editor of the volume Information Structure and Language Change: New Approaches to Word Order Variation in Germanic (with R. Hinterhölzl; Mouton de Gruyter, 2009). petrova@uni-wuppertal.de



Pintzuk



Susan Pintzuk is professor of English language and linguistics at the University of York, UK. Her research interests include syntactic variation and change, particularly in the history of English and other Germanic languages; statistical models of language change; and the role of information structure in syntactic change. Her work involves the application of statistical methods to historical data and the quantitative investigation of structural variation. She has participated in four projects to build large, annotated electronic corpora of early English. She has contributed to the Blackwell Handbook of Historical Linguistics and Handbook of the History of English. susan.pintzuk@york.ac.uk



Price



Jenny Price is currently completing her doctoral thesis at Monash University, Australia. Her areas of research include the accents and dialects of English, with a particular focus on Australian English, and intonation. Published articles include ‘New News Old News: A Sociophonetic Study of Spoken Australian English in News Broadcast Speech’ (Arbeiten aus Anglistik und Amerikanistik 33, 2008); ‘At the Crossroads: Where Age Meets Accent in the F1/F2 Vowel Space’ (Proceedings of the 11th Australian International Conference on Speech Science & Technology, 2006); ‘ “Allegations” and “Controversy”: Are the Americans Invading Our Intonational Space?’ (Selected Papers from the 2005 Conference of the Australian Linguistic Society, 2006). jj.price@telstra.com



Ritt



Nikolaus Ritt is professor of English historical linguistics at Vienna University. He has published on historical phonology (Quantity Adjustment; CUP, 1994) and the theory of language change (Selfish Sounds; CUP, 2004). His main concern is to combine the functionalist tenets of linguistic naturalism with the insight that languages are historical systems whose properties depend on being transmitted among speakers and generations of speakers. Current research (p. xxxi) projects focus on a usage- and corpus-based account of stress placement and on the interaction of phonology and morphology in the domain of (mor)phonotactics. nikolaus.ritt@univie.ac.at



Rudanko



Juhani Rudanko is professor of English at the University of Tampere, Finland. In his current research he concentrates on the system of English predicate complementation and its evolution in recent centuries, taking regional variation into account, and on the pragmatic analysis of political discourse in the early American Republic. Publications include Complementation and Case Grammar (SUNY Press, 1989); Prepositions and Complement Clauses (SUNY Press, 1996); and Changes in Complementation in British and American English (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011). Juhani.Rudanko@uta.fi



Rütten



Tanja Rütten is a postdoctorate researcher at the University of Cologne and one of the compilers of the Corpus of English Religious Prose. Her main research interests are historical speech-act theory, the pragmatics/semantics interface, and communication forms in Early English. Among her publications are morphosyntactic and pragmatic studies on the development of the religious register, including her book How to Do Things with Texts: Patterns of Instruction in Religious Discourse 1350–1700 (2011). She is currently developing a framework for investigating performative utterances in historical data, covering the earliest stages of the English language until the late nineteenth century. tanja.ruetten@uni-koeln.de



Schaefer



Ursula Schaefer is the vice rector for Academic and International Affairs at the Technische Universität Dresden, where she was professor of English linguistics (including historical linguistics) until August 2010. Her research interests have been focused on medieval English literature, culture, and language, on orality and literacy, and on the standardization of the English language in late Middle and Early Modern English. She is author of the monograph Vokalität: Altenglische Dichtung zwischen Mündlichkeit und Schriftlichkeit (1992) and has published a number of articles within the wide field of her research interests. schaef-u@mail.zih.tu-dresden.de



Schilk



Marco Schilk is senior lecturer for English linguistics at Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. His research interests include English syntax and lexicogrammar, varieties of English with a focus on Indian English, and quantitative corpus linguistics (including statistical modeling of natural language). He is the author of Structural Nativization in Indian English Lexicogrammar (2011), as well as various articles on South Asian Englishes, learner English, and corpus design. marco.schilk@anglistik.uni-giessen.de



(p. xxxii) Schneider, A.



Agnes Schneider studied modern languages and literatures (English, Romance, and German) at the University of Freiburg, Germany, and completed her MA in 2007. From 2008 to 2011 she worked as a part-time assistant professor in the English Department at the University of Freiburg and is currently working on her Ph.D., exploring morphosyntactic variation in West African varieties of English. agnes.schneider@anglistik.uni-freiburg.de



Schneider, E.



Edgar W. Schneider is chair professor of English linguistics at the University of Regensburg, Germany, after previous appointments in Bamberg, Georgia, and Berlin. His recent research has focused on forms, functions, and evolutionary processes of postcolonial Englishes around the world. He has written and edited about 20 books (including Handbook of Varieties of English, Mouton de Gruyter, 2nd edn., 2008; and Postcolonial English, CUP, 2007; English around the World, CUP, 2011) and edits the scholarly journal English World-Wide. He has published and lectured on all continents on the dialectology, sociolinguistics, history, and semantics of English and its varieties. edgar.schneider@sprachlit.uni-regensburg.de



Seoane



Elena Seoane is senior lecturer in English at the University of Vigo (Spain). She has contributed to the Blackwell Handbook of the History of English (A. van Kemenade and B. Los, eds.; 2006) and Historical Linguistics of English: An International Handbook (A. Bergs and L. Brinton, eds.; De Gruyter Mouton, 2012). She has also edited Theoretical and Empirical Issues in Grammaticalization and Rethinking Grammaticalization (with M. López-Couso; Benjamins, 2008). Her most recent publications discuss changes in word order (A. Meurman-Solin, M. López-Couso, and B. Los, eds.; OUP, 2012), voice in scientific discourse (Journal of Historical Pragmatics, 2013), and methods in corpus linguistics (with N. Smith, in M. Krug and J. Schlüter, eds.; CUP, forthcoming). elena.seoane@uvigo.es



Sharma



Devyani Sharma is senior lecturer at Queen Mary, University of London. She has published research in the areas of dialect variation in postcolonial and other Englishes, sociolinguistics, second-language acquisition, and syntax. She is completing a book on dialect birth in postcolonial settings and is a coeditor of the Oxford Handbook of World Englishes (with M. Filppula and J. Klemola; OUP, forthcoming) and Research Methods in Linguistics (with R. Podesva; CUP, forthcoming). d.sharma@qmul.ac.uk



Shaw



Philip A. Shaw is lecturer in the English language and Old English at the University of Leicester. His research interests center on Old English and other early Germanic languages, and he is currently working on orthographic practices in early Old (p. xxxiii) English coin epigraphy and royal diplomas. Joan C. Beal and he prepared the second edition of Charles Barber's The English Language: A Historical Introduction (CUP, 2009), and he has recently published Pagan Goddesses in the Early Germanic World: Eostre, Hreda, and the Cult of Matrons (Bristol Classical Press, 2011). ps209@leicester.ac.uk



Smith



Jeremy J. Smith is professor of English philology at the University of Glasgow. His research interests are in English historical linguistics, the history of Scots and English in Scotland, textual criticism, and the interface between language and literature. He is currently working on the linguistic reworking of medieval English and Scottish texts during the early modern and Enlightenment periods and on the interface between writing and speech in Middle English (in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Stavanger). His books include An Historical Study of English: Function, Form, and Change (1996); Sound Change and the History of English (2007); and Older Scots: A Linguistic Reader (in press, 2012). Jeremy.Smith@glasgow.ac.uk



Speyer



Augustin Speyer is professor for historical grammar in the German Department at the University of Göttingen. He works primarily on syntax, phonology, pragmatics, and their interfaces from both a synchronic and a diachronic perspective. At the moment the focus lies on German word order, especially the “prefield,” the status of schwa in the history of German, and infinitival syntax. Recent works include Topicalization and Stress Clash Avoidance in the History of English (De Gruyter Mouton, 2010); ‘German Vorfeld-Filling as Constraint Interaction’, in Constraints in Discourse (A. Benz and P. Kühnlein, eds.; Benjamins, 2008); ‘Die Freiheit der Mittelfeldabfolge im Deutschen: Ein modernes Phänomen’, Beiträge zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache und Literatur 133 (2011). aspeyer@gwdg.de



Stenroos



Merja Stenroos is professor of English linguistics at the University of Stavanger, Norway. She does research in historical dialectology and sociolinguistics, with focus on Middle English, as well as in Middle English orthography, lexicology, pragmatics, and scribal practices. She has been the principal investigator of the Middle English Grammar Project team at Stavanger since 2006, and she is a cocompiler of the Middle English Grammar Corpus (MEG-C). merja.stenroos@uis.no



Szmrecsanyi



Benedikt Szmrecsanyi is a fellow with the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany. His research interests include variationist linguistics, dialectology, and dialectometry, varieties of English worldwide, historical linguistics, and the interface between language and dialect typology. He is the author of Morphosyntactic Persistence in Spoken English (Mouton de Gruyter, 2006) and a coeditor with B. Kortmann of a volume titled Linguistic Complexity (De Gruyter Mouton, 2012). bszm@frias.uni-freiburg.de



(p. xxxiv) Taylor



Ann Taylor is senior lecturer in linguistics at the University of York, UK. Her current research interests focus primarily on Old English syntax and include the effects of information structure on the position of objects, the effect on syntax of translation from Latin, and the interaction of syntax and prosody in metrical texts. She is cocreator with colleagues at the universities of Pennsylvania, York, and Helsinki of the syntactically annotated corpora of Old, Middle, and Early Modern English known as the YCOE, PPCME2, and PCEEC (see list of corpora and databases). ann.taylor@york.ac.uk



Traugott



Elizabeth Closs Traugott is professor emerita of linguistics and English at Stanford University, California. She has done research in English historical syntax, semantics, pragmatics, lexicalization, and linguistics and literature. She is currently developing a framework for investigating language change from a construction grammar perspective (with G. Trousdale). She has contributed to the Cambridge History of English, vol. 1 (R. Hogg, ed., 1992) and the Blackwell Handbook of the History of English (A. van Kemenade and B. Los, eds., 2006). Her books include Grammaticalization (with P. Hopper, 2nd edn., 2003) and Regularity in Semantic Change (with R. Dasher, 2002). She is coeditor with B. Kortmann of the series Topics in English Linguistics (De Gruyter Mouton). traugott@stanford.edu



Trousdale



Graeme Trousdale is senior lecturer in the department of linguistics and English language at the University of Edinburgh. He has published articles on synchronic and diachronic variation in English. His current research is concerned with the intersection of constructional approaches to language change with processes of grammaticalization, lexicalization, and degrammaticalization. He has published a book on variation in English (An Introduction to English Sociolinguistics, 2010) and is currently coediting the Oxford Handbook of Construction Grammar (with T. Hoffmann). graeme.trousdale@ed.ac.uk



Urban



Having earned an MA in linguistics from the University of Cologne, Matthias Urban is a doctoral student at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig. His dissertation, ‘Analyzability and Semantic Associations in Referring Expressions: A Study in Comparative Lexicology’, focuses on lexical typology, in particular questions pertaining to cross-linguistic differences in analyzability in the lexicon and recurrent semantic associations therein. He is also actively engaged in research in historical linguistics. m.urban@umail.leidenuniv.nl



(p. xxxv) Wallage



Phillip Wallage is lecturer in English language and linguistics at Northumbria University, UK. He uses statistical techniques and quantitative data from large-scale corpora to examine change in progress. His work focuses particularly on changes in the way negation is expressed during the history of English. Currently he is investigating the role of pragmatic change in the grammaticalization of English not. His publications include ‘Jespersen's Cycle in Middle English: Parametric Variation and Grammatical Competition’, Lingua 118 (2008), and ‘Negative Inversion, Negative Concord, and Sentential Negation in the History of English’, English Language and Linguistics (2012). phillip.wallage@northumbria.ac.uk



Wichmann



Søren Wichmann is senior scientist at Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany. His research spans historical linguistics, language documentation, and typology. In recent years he has contributed to the development of new quantitative methods for investigating the prehistory of languages and to the computational modeling of language dynamics. Representative monographs are The Mixe-Zoqean Languages of Mexico (1995) and Assessing Temporal Stability for Linguistic Typological Features (with E. Holman, 2009). His papers have appeared in a wide array of journals, including Language, Journal of Linguistics, Diachronica, Oceanic Linguistics, Human Biology, and Communications in Computational Physics. wichmann@eva.mpg.de



Wierzbicka



Anna Wierzbicka is professor of linguistics at the Australian National University. Her 1972 book, Semantic Primitives, launched a search for semantic universals that has led to the creation of the natural semantic metalanguage (NSM) and to the identification of 64 universal human concepts that can serve as a common measure for comparing meanings across languages, cultures, and epochs. For this work in 2010 she was awarded the Polish Science Foundation's Prize for the Humanities and Social Sciences and the Russian Academy of Science's Dobrushin Prize (usually awarded to mathematicians). Her latest book in English is Experience, Evidence, and Sense: The Hidden Cultural Legacy of English (OUP, 2010). anna.wierzbicka@anu.edu.au



Wiltshire



Caroline R. Wiltshire is associate professor and chair of the Linguistics Department at the University of Florida, Gainesville. She has done research on the phonology of Dravidian and Romance languages and more recently has focused on the phonetics and phonology of Tibeto-Burman languages and of Indian English. Recent articles include ‘An Acoustic Study of Dimasa Tones’ (with P. Sarmah, 2009); ‘The Influence of Gujarati and Tamil L1s on Indian English’ (with J. Harnsberger, 2006) and ‘The “Indian English” of Tibeto-Burman Language Speakers’ (2005). wiltshir@ufl.edu



(p. xxxvi) Winford



Donald Winford is professor of linguistics at The Ohio State University. His teaching and research interests are in creole linguistics, variationist sociolinguistics, contact linguistics, and African American English, and he has published widely in those areas. He is the author of Predication in Caribbean English Creoles (1993) and An Introduction to Contact Linguistics (2003). He served as president of the Society for Caribbean Linguistics from 1998 to 2000 and has been editor of the Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages since August 2001. dwinford@ling.ohio-state.edu.