Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 13 December 2018

Abstract and Keywords

This article has been commissioned as part of the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Music Revival edited by Caroline Bithell and Juniper Hill. This essay examines the uses of revival performance in the politics of nationalism and regionalism in postcolonial Senegal. In the 1960s, President Léopold Sédar Senghor’s regime chose to foster the performing arts as an essential component in nation-building. This was in continuity with French colonial policy, in which educated young men had been encouraged to create a genre of school musical theater drawing on modern European theater, choreography, and regional traditions centered on the performance of historical epics. The National Ballet created in 1961 thus attempted to revive selective aspects of the region’s history to legitimize the politics of the present. The essay then shows how, when the state lost its capacity to act as an exclusive patron of the arts in the 1980s, urban migrants from regions at the margins of the nation, such as the Casamance, appropriated the genre for their own regionalist and transnational agendas.

Keywords: Senegal, Casamance, nationalism, regionalism, National Ballet, musical theatre, choreographic revival, Léopold Sédar Senghor

Access to the complete content on Oxford Handbooks Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can''t find the answer there, please contact us.