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date: 23 October 2018

(p. xxxv) List of Contributors

(p. xxxv) List of Contributors

Michel Aglietta is Professor at the University of Paris-X Nanterre, Scientific Advisor for the Research Center in International Economics (CEPII), consultant at Groupama-am, and former member of the French Council of Economic Advisors attached to the Prime Minister. His most influential writings include Régulation et crise du capitalisme, La Violence de la Monnaie (with A. Orléan), and Globalisation financière: lʼaventure obligée (with A. Brender and Virginie Coudert). Recent books include Corporate Governance adrift (with A Rebérioux), 2005; Désordres dans le capitalisme mondial (with A. Berrebi), 2007; La crise, 2008; and Crise et rénovation de la finance, 2009.



Franklin Allen is the Nippon Life Professor of Finance and has been on the faculty at Wharton since 1980. He is Co-Director of the Financial Institutions Center. He is a past President of the American Finance Association. He received his doctorate from Oxford University.



Linda Allen is the Presidential Professor of Finance at the Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College, City University of New York, and Adjunct Professor of Finance at the Stern School of Business at New York University. She has been a member of the Standard & Poor's Academic Council since its formation in 2004.



Olivier de Bandt holds a PhD from the Department of Economics of the University of Chicago. He is currently Director of Business Conditions and Macroeconomic Forecasting at the Banque de France and Associate Professor at the University of Paris X.



James R. Barth is the Lowder Eminent Scholar in Finance at Auburn University and a Senior Finance Fellow at the Milken Institute. His research has focused on financial institutions and capital markets, both domestic and global, with special emphasis on regulatory issues. Most recently, he served as leader of an international team advising the People's Bank of China on banking reform.



Allen N. Berger is the H. Montague Osteen, Jr., Professor in Banking and Finance, Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina; Senior Fellow, Wharton Financial Institutions Center; Extramural Fellow, CentER, Tilburg University; and Secretary/Treasurer, Financial Intermediation Research Society. He has published more than a hundred articles, including papers in Journal of Political Economy, American Economic Review, Journal of Monetary Economics, Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial Economics, and Review of Financial Studies.



(p. xxxvi) John P. Bonin is the Chester D. Hubbard Professor of Economics and Social Science at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. Bonin was the Editor of the Journal of Comparative Economics from 1996 to 2006. He has worked as a consultant for the World Bank, the United Nations, the US Treasury, the Institute for EastWest Studies, the Institute for International Economics (WIIW) in Vienna, and the 1990 Institute.



Arnoud W. A. Boot is Professor of Corporate Finance and Financial Markets at the University of Amsterdam, and research fellow at CEPR. He is a member of the Bank Council of the Dutch Central Bank (DNB) and advisor to the Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden). His research focuses on corporate finance and financial institutions. Prior to his current positions, he was on the faculty of the J. L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University.



Claudia M. Buch holds the chair for International Finance and Macroeconomics University of Tubingen. She has been Scientific Director of the Institute for Applied Economic Research since January 2005 and a member of the Council of Economic Advisers to the German Ministry of Economics and Labor since 2004. She was affiliated with the Kiel Institute for World Economics (Germany) from 1992 to 2003, where she headed the research area ‘Financial Markets’. She graduated from the University of Bonn with a Master of Economics in 1991 and from the University of Wisconsin with a Master of Business Administration in 1989. From the University of Kiel, she received a PhD in Economics in 1996 and a Habilitation (German post-doc. degree) in 2002. She has been a visiting scholar at the Salomon Center for the Study of Financial Institutions (New York University), at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor), at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Mass.), and at the Research Centre of the Deutsche Bundesbank (Frankfurt).



Charles W. Calomiris is the Henry Kaufman Professor of Financial Institutions at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business and a Professor at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs. Professor Calomiris co-directs the Project on Financial Deregulation at the American Enterprise Institute, is a member of the Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee and the Financial Economists Roundtable, and is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received a BA in economics from Yale University in 1979 and a PhD in Economics from Stanford University in 1985.



Gerard Caprio is Professor of Economics and Chair of the Center for Development Economics, Williams College; previously: Director for Financial Sector Policy and Manager, Financial Sector Research, World Bank; Vice President, JPMorgan; economist at the Federal Reserve and IMF; Adjunct Professor, George Washington University. Jerry has researched and written extensively on financial sector issues and banking crises in developing countries, including Rethinking Bank Regulation: Till Angels Govern (Cambridge, 2006), with James Barth and Ross Levine. He is a co-editor of the Journal of Financial Stability.



(p. xxxvii) Elena Carletti is a Professor at the European University Institute. Her research interests are in the areas of banking, financial stability, corporate governance industrial organization, and competition policy. She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and a Habilitation from the University of Mannheim.



Fernando J. Cardim de Carvalho is Professor of Economics at the Institute of Economics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and Director of the Money and Finance Study Group headquartered at the same university. A former chairman of the Brazilian Association of Graduate Schools in Economics (ANPEC), his research interests are Keynesian macroeconomics, international monetary economics, and financial systems.



Jacopo Carmassi is a researcher at Assonime, the Association of Joint Stock Companies incorporated in Italy, and a Fellow of the Wharton Financial Institutions Center. He holds a PhD in Law and Economics from the University LUISS Guido Carli of Rome and is a former visiting scholar at the Wharton Financial Institutions Center. His research and work activities have focused on banking and financial markets regulation and supervision.



Nicola Cetorelli is a Senior Economist in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and a Fellow of the WhartonFinancial Institutions Center. His Research work has focused on the many ways banks affect the real economy, with a specific interest more recently in topics of international banking and financial globalization. He has published in the Journal of Finance, the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, and various policy journals. He received his PhD in Economics from Brown University and a BA from the University of Rome, Italy.



Gayle L. DeLong is an Associate Professor in the Economics and Finance Department at Baruch College. She received her Masters in International Business Studies from the University of South Carolina in 1984 and her PhD in International Business and Finance from New York University in 1998. Her research interests include bank mergers, international finance, and the economics of health care. She received research grants from the Zicklin School of Business, TransCoop Program of the Alexander Humboldt Foundation, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation's Center for Financial Research, where she is a Fellow. She received the Eugene M. Lang Fellowship for Junior Faculty as well as doctoral fellowships at New York University. Since 2007, she has served on the Research Committee of Sensible Action for Ending Mercury-induced Neurological Disorders.



Asli Demirgüç-Kunt is the Senior Research Manager in Finance and Private Sector, in the World Bank's Development Economics Research Group. After joining the Bank in 1989 as a Young Economist, she has been in different divisions of the (p. xxxviii) Research Group, working on financial sector issues. Her recent research has focused on banking crises, financial regulation, and the links between finance and economic development.



Robert DeYoung is Capitol Federal Professor in Financial Institutions and Markets at the University of Kansas. He is also an editor of the Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, a research program coordinator at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and a Visiting Scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.



Astrid A. Dick is Assistant Professor of Economics at INSEAD. Previously, she spent five years as an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and at the Federal Reserve Board in Washington. She received her PhD in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2002.



Thomas A. Durkin is Senior Economist, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, DC. He has specialized in the economics and regulation of consumer financial services in the federal government as Senior Economist at the Federal Reserve Board, in the academic area as Associate Professor of Finance at the Pennsylvania State University, and in the private sector as Chief Economist and Director of Research of the American Financial Services Association. He holds an AB degree from Georgetown University and a PhD degree from Columbia University.



Robert A. Eisenbeis is currently Chief Monetary Economist at Cumberland Advisors. He recently retired as Executive Vice President and Director of Research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, and had previously been at the Board of Governors and FDIC. He is now a member of the US Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee.



Gregory Elliehausen holds a Research Associate Professor position with the Financial Services Research Program at The George Washington University, Washington, DC. He has held a similar position with the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University and has been a member of the economics staff at the Federal Reserve Board. He holds BS and PhD degrees from the Pennsylvania State University.



Mark J. Flannery earned economics degrees from Princeton and Yale Universities. Since 1989, he has held an Eminent Scholar chair in the University of Florida's Department of Finance. He has consulted with various regulatory agencies and helped found the FDIC's Center for Financial Research.



W. Scott Frame is a financial economist and policy advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. His research broadly relates to the effect of technological and regulatory change on retail credit markets. Prior to joining the Atlanta Fed, Scott was a senior financial economist at the US Treasury Department.



Xavier Freixas is Dean of the Undergraduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Professor at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona (Spain), and (p. xxxix) Research Fellow at CEPR. He is also Chairman of the Risk-Based Regulation Program of the Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP). He has been a consultant for the European Investment Bank, the New York Fed, the European Central Bank, the World Bank, the Inter-american Development Bank, and the European Investment Bank. He received his PhD from the University of Toulouse in 1978.



John Goddard is Professor of Financial Economics at Bangor Business School, University of Wales, Bangor. Before joining Bangor University in 2005, he was Professor of Economics at Swansea University. His research interests include the economics of banking and financial services, industrial organization, and the economics of professional soccer.



Michael B. Gordy is a Senior Economist at the Federal Reserve Board. His current research focuses on credit risk pricing, and on the design, calibration, and computation of models of portfolio risk. Michael is a recipient of Risk's 2004 Quant of the Year and GARP's 2003 Financial Risk Manager of the Year, and serves as an associate editor of Journal of Banking & Finance, Journal of Credit Risk, and International Journal of Central Banking. Michael received his PhD in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994.



Timothy H. Hannan is Senior Economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of Wisconsin in 1974. His area of interest is bank behavior and competition.



Philipp Hartmann is Head of the Financial Research Division at the European Central Bank, a Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research, and the Vice-President of SUERF—the European Money and Finance Forum. He works in banking, financial stability, European capital markets, and international monetary affairs. His research is published in academic journals, including Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, Economic Policy, Journal of International Money and Finance, and Journal of Banking & Finance, and several books. His policy work has been discussed in fora such as the ECOFIN Council, the ECB Governing Council, European Commission fora, and the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision and published in numerous reports.



Iftekhar Hasan is the E. Gerald Corrigan Chair in International Business and Finance at the Schools of Business of Fordham University, New York. His research focus is primarily in the area of financial intermediation and corporate finance. He serves as a scientific advisor of the Bank of Finland; a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; and a Research Associate at the Berkley Center of New York University.



Erik A. Heitfield is a senior economist at the Federal Reserve Board where he conducts research on the measurement and management of credit risk in complex financial institutions. In 2004 and 2005 Erik co-chaired the Basel Committee's Loss Given Default Working Group and in 2006 and 2007 Erik was a senior staff (p. xl) economist for the President's Council of Economic Advisors. Erik received his PhD in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1998.



Richard Herring is Jacob Safra Professor of International Banking and Professor of Finance at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, where he is also Co-Director of The Wharton Financial Institutions Center. Outside the University he serves as Co-Chair of the US Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee. His area of special interest is financial regulation and international finance.



Patrick Honohan is Professor of International Financial Economics and Development at Trinity College Dublin and a research fellow of CEPR. Previously he was a Senior Advisor at the World Bank and his career has also included periods on the staffs of the IMF, the Central Bank of Ireland, the Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin, and as Economic Advisor to the Taoiseach. In 2009, he was appointed Governor of the Central Bank of Ireland.



Joseph P. Hughes is Professor of Economics at Rutgers University. His research has been published in such journals as American Economic Review, Journal of Banking & Finance, Journal of Economic Theory, Journal of Financial Services Research, Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, and Review of Economics and Statistics. He received his PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.



David Humphrey is F. W. Smith Eminent Scholar in Banking at Florida State University. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of California (Berkeley) and was previously at the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond for sixteen years working on banking and payment system issues.



Edward J. Kane is the James F. Cleary Professor in Finance at Boston College. He is a member of the US Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee, a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, and a senior fellow in the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation's Center for Financial Research. He is a past president and fellow of the American Finance Association, a former Guggenheim fellow, and a longtime research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He served for twelve years on the finance committee of Teachers Insurance. His BS is from Georgetown University and his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute for Technology.



George G. Kaufman is the John F. Smith Professor of Economics and Finance at Loyola University Chicago and consultant to the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Previously he was an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and a Professor of Finance at the University of Oregon. Kaufman is co-editor of Journal of Financial Stability and a founding editor of Journal of Financial Services Research. He is former president of the Western Finance Association, the Midwest Finance Association, and the North American Economic and Finance Association. He serves as co-chair of the Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee. He holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Iowa.



(p. xli) Leora Klapper is a Senior Economist in the Finance and Private Sector Team of the Development Economics Research Group at the World Bank in Washington, DC. Her published research focuses on entrepreneurship, SME and corporate finance, corporate governance, and corporate risk management. She is the also the author of the ‘World Bank Group Entrepreneurship Database’. Her operational work includes promoting the development of credit information bureaus in South Asia; factoring in Eastern Europe; and the use of technology for the delivery of financial services in India and Africa. Prior to joining the World Bank, she worked at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Bank of Israel, and Salomon Smith Barney. She holds a PhD in Financial Economics from the Stern School of Business at New York University.



Andreas Lehnert is Chief of the Household and Real Estate Finance section in the Division of Research and Statistics at the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, DC. He monitors and analyzes developments in the household sector, especially in areas of mortgages and housing markets. His research in these areas has focused on both individual households as well as institutions. With regard to individual household behavior, his research has addressed such topics as the choice of mortgage type, the effect of consumer bankruptcy and foreclosure laws, the relationship of housing wealth and consumption, and the effect of consumer protection regulations such as the Community Reinvestment Act. With regard to institutions, his research has addressed topics such as the effect of the housing-related Government-sponsored enterprises on mortgage rates, the role of bank capital regulation on mortgage markets, and the role of banking competition on credit supply to riskier borrowers.



Juan A. Marchetti is an economist at the World Trade Organization (Trade in Services Division). He is the secretary of the WTO Committee on Trade in Financial Services. He holds a degree in Economics from the University of Buenos Aires.



James McAndrews is Senior Vice President and Head of the Money and Payments Studies Function at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of Iowa, was previously Research Advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, and works on payment issues.



David Marqués Ibáñez is an economist at the Financial Research Division of the European Central Bank. He previously worked as a policy economist, in charge of analysing financing conditions in the euro area at the Monetary Policy Directorate of the ECB since the inception of the euro. He holds undergraduates degrees from the University of Granada and the University of Florence, and a Master's degree and a PhD from the University of Wales, Bangor. His research interests are securitization, empirical banking, corporate finance, and microeconometrics.



(p. xlii) Maria Soledad Martinez-Peria is a Senior Economist in the Finance and Private Sector Development Team of the Development Economics Research Group at the World Bank. Her published work has focused on currency and banking crises, depositor market discipline, foreign bank participation in developing countries, and access to finance. Currently, she is conducting research on financial sector outreach, bank financing to SMEs, and on the impact of remittances on financial development. Prior to joining the World Bank, she worked at the Brookings Institution, the Central Bank of Argentina, the Federal Reserve Board, and the International Monetary Fund. She holds a PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA from Stanford University.



Loretta J. Mester is a senior Vice President and director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia; an Adjunct Professor of Finance at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; and a Fellow at the Wharton Financial Institutions Center. Her research has been published in Journal of Finance, American Economic Review, Review of Financial Studies, and Review of Economics and Statistics, among others. She received her PhD in Economics from Princeton University.



Benoît Mojon is the Head of the Monetary Policy Research Division at the Banque de France. He previously worked in the research departments of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago (2007–2008) and the European Central Bank (1998–2006). He was Associated Professor at the University of Aix en Provence from 2004 to 2006. His research on monetary policy transmission and on inflation dynamics was published in leading academic journals such as the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Review of Economics and Statistics, and the NBER Macroannual.



Philip Molyneux is currently Professor in Banking and Finance and Head of Bangor Business School at Bangor University. His research interests include competition, risk, and performance in European banking and developments in global wealth management. In 2001 he was the Visiting Bertill Daniellson Research Fellow at the Stockholm School of Economics and University of Gothenburg. Between 2002 and 2005 he acted as a member of the ECON Financial Services expert panel for the European Parliament. He has recently held visiting Professorships at Bocconi University, Erasmus University, and Bolzano Free University, Italy.



Alan D. Morrison is Professor of Finance at the Saïd Business School of the University of Oxford, a Research Affiliate of the Centre for Economic Policy Research, and a Research Associate of the European Corporate Governance Institute. His research concerns the regulation and industrial organization of commercial and investment banks.



Daniel E. Nolle is a Senior Financial Economist with the US Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. He is responsible for policy analysis on banking structure and performance issues, and he has contributed to the work of the Basel Committee (p. xliii) on Banking Supervision. Daniel Nolle's research interests are in international banking, the US banking system structure, and Internet banking.



Bruno M. Parigi is Professor of Economics, University of Padova, Italy. He has held visiting positions at the European Central Bank, University of Munich, University of Toulouse, and the European University Institute. His research interests are in banking, central banking, and corporate governance. He received his PhD from Rutgers University.



Luiz Fernando de Paula is Associate Professor of Economics at the State University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and CNPq Researcher. His research interests include banking efficiency, financial systems, Keynesian macroeconomics, and economic policies related to emerging countries.



Joe Peek holds the Gatton Endowed Chair in International Banking and Financial Economics at the University of Kentucky. Joe Peek received a BS in Mathematics from Oklahoma State University, and a PhD in Economics from Northwestern University. His research topics include international banking, bank regulation, monetary policy, and credit availability.



José Luis Peydró has been an economist at the European Central Bank since 2005. His specialization is financial intermediation and monetary policy. He holds a PhD in Finance from INSEAD, a Masters in Economics and Finance from CEMFI, and a BA in Economics from the University of Barcelona. He won the First Prize for the best Economics BA student in Spain in 1997.



Eric S. Rosengren is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. In his research, Rosengren has written extensively on macroeconomics, international banking, bank supervision, and risk management. Rosengren holds a BA from Colby College and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin.



Anthony Saunders is the John M. Schiff Professor of Finance and former Chair of the Department of Finance at the Stern School of Business at New York University. He holds positions on the Board of Academic Consultants of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, as well as the Council of Research Advisors for the Federal National Mortgage Association, and has been a visiting scholar at the Comptroller of the Currency and at the International Monetary Fund.



Wanvimol Sawangngoenyuang is an economist at the Research Division of the Bank of Thailand. She completed her PhD in Economics at Claremont Graduate University. She has taught Economics at California State Polytechnic University and Loyola Marymount University. Her research has focused on financial institutions and capital markets, both domestic and global, with special emphasis on banking crises.



Martin Scheicher is Senior Economist at the Financial Research Division of the European Central Bank. Before joining the ECB he worked at the Austrian Central (p. xliv) Bank and the University of Vienna. His research interests are risk management and empirical finance. His most recent work has focused on the market pricing of credit derivatives. He was educated at the University of Vienna and the London School of Economics.



Kevin J. Stiroh is a Vice President at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Kevin Stiroh received a BA in Economics and Psychology from Swarthmore College and a PhD in Economics from Harvard University.



Philip E. Strahan is a Professor of Finance at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College, a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a Fellow at the WhartonFinancial Institutions Center. Previously, Professor Strahan spent seven years in the Research and Market Analysis Group of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He received a PhD in Economics from the University of Chicago in 1993. Professor Strahan's research interests include the effects of deregulation on the structure and efficiency of the banking industry, the impact of consolidation on bank lending, the political economy of banking, deregulation, and risk management practices in banking.



Anjan V. Thakor is the John E. Simon Professor of Finance and Senior Associate Dean at the Olin School of Business at Washington University in St Louis and a Research Associate of the European Corporate Governance Institute. He was previously the Edward J. Frey Professor of Banking and Finance at the University of Michigan Business School, and the NBD Professor of Finance at the Indiana University Business School. He received his PhD from Northwestern University. He has served as editor of Journal of Financial Intermediation and associate editor of many other journals, and is past President of The Financial Intermediation Research Society.



Hirofumi Uchida is Associate Professor of Banking and Finance at the Graduate School of Business Administration at Kobe. His research interests focus on financial institutions and financial system architecture. Hirofumi Uchida was a visiting scholar at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University as a 2003 Fulbright Scholar.



Gregory Udell is the Chase Chair of Banking and Finance at Indiana University and Associate Editor of six academic journals. He has been a consultant to the Federal Reserve Board, the Bank of Japan, the International Financial Corporation, the OECD, the Riksbank, the World Bank, and the Federal Reserve Banks of Chicago and San Francisco.



Paul Wachtel is Professor of Economics at the Stern School of Business at New York University where he has been on the faculty for thirty-five years and has served as Department Chair and Vice Dean. Wachtel is an associate editor of Journal of Banking & Finance and of Journal of Financial Stability. He has been a consultant (p. xlv) for the World Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the Croatian National Bank, and the Bank of Finland.



Lawrence J. White is a Professor of Economics at the Stern School of Business at New York University. His research encompasses financial services regulation and antitrust and regulatory policy, more broadly. During 1986–1989 he took leave from NYU to serve as a board member on the Federal Home Loan Bank Board.



Jonathan Williams is a Professor in Banking and Finance at Bangor University, where he is affiliated to the Centre of Banking and Finance and Institute of European Finance. His research interests focus on the effects that financial liberalization has had on the banking industry in both industrialized countries and emerging markets.



John O. S. Wilson is Professor of Banking and Finance at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. His research interests focus on the areas of European banking, UK and US credit unions, and financial exclusion. He has been involved in work which examines the profitability and growth of European banks; competition, risk, and performance in European banking; growth, development, diversification, technology adoption, mergers, and performance of credit unions, and their role in tackling financial exclusion.



Bilal Zia is an economist in the Finance Team of the Development Research Group at the World Bank. He joined in July 2006 after completing his PhD in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research is focused on firms, banks, and access to finance. In recent work, he has studied financial constraints and the allocation of credit subsidies using unique loan-level data from Pakistan; the impact of financial shocks on banks and bank lending; and the effects of financial shocks on industrial composition and corporate groups. He is also involved in studying household level banking services using randomized control trials and household surveys in Indonesia. He holds an MCP and a PhD in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a BSc (Hons) from the London School of Economics.



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