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date: 17 December 2018

Introduction

Abstract and Keywords

This part of the book introduces the content of Part I of the text. Part I provides insights into the development of the MIS field and through a historical overview traces five decades of the information systems academic field looking at developments in technology, research themes, schools of thought, education and the curriculum, and infrastructural advancements and the launch of professional societies.

Keywords: MIS field, historical overview, information systems, research themes, developments in technology, professional societies

In this volume, The Oxford Handbook of Management Information Systems: Critical Perspectives and New Directions, we include twenty-six chapters by leading scholars in the field. We present this body of work in four parts, including Setting the Scene (Part I), Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives in MIS (Part II), Rethinking Theory in MIS Practice (Part III), and Rethinking MIS Practice in a Broader Context (Part IV).

In the opening chapter to this volume, Lynne Markus provides valuable insights into the development of the MIS field, considering how changing technology has posed a series of important challenges to organizations and individuals. This is followed by a chapter by Rudy Hirschheim and Heinz K. Klein (1940–2008) where they trace five decades of the information systems academic field. They divide the decades into four eras from 1964 to 1974, 1975 to 1984, 1985 to 1994, and from 1995 onwards. They include important developments in technology, research themes, schools of thought, education and the curriculum, and infrastructural advancements and the launch of professional societies. This historical overview is critically important for gaining a wide appreciation of how the information systems field has developed from the early 1960s to the present day. (p. 2)