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date: 25 April 2019

Abstract and Keywords

The origins of forager-farmer interaction is a complex topic in North American prehistory because the lack of domestic herd animals meant that all prehistoric populations on this continent trapped, hunted, and/or fished for at least some of their meat supply. Moreover, it was not uncommon for some North American populations to rely on a flexible mix of cultivation, gathering, and hunting, and for others to oscillate between farming and hunting and gathering. Documenting prehistoric forager-farmer interaction is also complicated by the archaeological invisibility of many of the trade items (dried meat, fish, hides, and corn), and the difficulty distinguishing between foraging and farming sites in the archaeological record. Nonetheless, archaeologists have made great strides in understanding some of the prehistoric forager-farmer interactive systems. This article reviews current knowledge concerning the Iroquois-Algonquian, Middle Missouri, and especially the relatively well-documented Plains-Pueblo interactive system, and discusses directions for future research on forager-farmer interaction.

Keywords: forager-farmer interaction, archaeological, Plains, Pueblo, Middle Missouri, Algonquian, Iroquois

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