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date: 21 February 2019

(p. xvii) List of Contributors

(p. xvii) List of Contributors

David J. Baker is Peter G. Phialas Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of Between Nations: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marvell and the Question of Britain (1997), and On Demand: Writing for the Market in Early Modern England (2010). With Willy Maley he co‐edited British Identities and English Renaissance Literature (2002).



Elizabeth Jane Bellamy is Professor of English and John C. Hodges Chair of Excellence at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She is the author of Translations of Power: Narcissism and the Unconscious in Epic History (1992) and Affective Genealogies: Psychoanalysis, Postmodernism, and the ‘Jewish Question’ after Auschwitz (1997). With Patrick Cheney and Michael Schoenfeldt she co‐edited Imagining Death in Spenser and Milton (2003).



Joseph L. Black is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His publications include The Martin Marprelate Tracts (2008) and various articles on Renaissance literature and book history; he was editor of the Sidney Journal 2000–5. With Robert Fehrenbach he co‐edited Private Libraries of Renaissance England, vol. vii (2009); with Anne Lake Prescott, The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, vol. ii: The Renaissance and Early Seventeenth Century (2006); and with Alan Rudrum and Holly Nelson, The Broadview Anthology of Seventeenth‐Century English Verse and Prose (2000).



Kenneth Borris is Professor of English Literature at McGill University. A former Canada Research Fellow and winner of the MacCaffrey Award, he has authored Spenser's Poetics of Prophecy in ‘The Faerie Queene’ V (1990) and Allegory and Epic in Renaissance English Literature: Heroic Form in Spenser, Sidney, and Milton (2000). He has edited Same‐Sex Desire in the English Renaissance: A Sourcebook of Texts, 1470–1650 (2004). With George Klawitter he co‐edited The Affectionate Shepherd: Celebrating Richard Barnfield (2001); with George Rousseau, The Sciences of Homosexuality in Early Modern Europe (2008); and with Jon Quitslund and Carol Kaske, Spenser and Platonism, Spenser Studies XXIV.



Ciaran Brady is a Fellow and Associate Professor of History at Trinity College Dublin. He is the author of The Chief Governors: The Rise and Fall of Reform Government in Tudor Ireland (1994) and of a biography of Shane O'Neill (1996). He is the editor of (and a contributor to) several collections of essays and the author of several articles in scholarly journals.



(p. xviii) Christopher Burlinson is a Fellow in English at Jesus College, Cambridge. His publications include Allegory, Space, and the Material World in the Writings of Edmund Spenser (2006) and, with Andrew Zurcher, Edmund Spenser: Selected Letters and Other Papers (2009).



Colin Burrow is a Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. He is author of Epic Romance: Homer to Milton (1993), and Edmund Spenser (1996), and of numerous articles, chiefly on the reception of classical literature in the Renaissance. He has edited The Complete Sonnets and Poems for the Oxford Shakespeare (2002), Metaphysical Poetry (2006), and the poems for the forthcoming Cambridge Edition of the Works of Ben Jonson.



Joseph Campana is Assistant Professor of English at Rice University in Houston, Texas. He has published essays on Renaissance literature in PMLA, Modern Philology, Shakespeare, and elsewhere. He is the author of a collection of poems, The Book of Faces (2005), and the recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Currently, he is completing a study of the 1590 Faerie Queene entitled Disarming Mars: Edmund Spenser and the Poetics of Vulnerability.



Lisa Celovsky, Associate Professor of English at Suffolk University, studies Renaissance poetry, epic romance, and gender issues. Her essays on Spenser and on members of the Sidney family have appeared in English Literary Renaissance, the Sidney Journal, and Studies in Philology.



Patrick Cheney is Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Penn State University. He is the author of Spenser's Famous Flight: A Renaissance Idea of a Literary Career (1993) and Marlowe's Counterfeit Profession: Ovid, Spenser, Counter‐Nationhood (1997), as well as co‐editor of Worldmaking Spenser (2000) and Imagining Death in Spenser and Milton (2003). A past President of the International Spenser Society, he currently serves on the Editorial Board at Spenser Studies and is a General Editor of The Oxford Edition of the Collected Works of Edmund Spenser (forthcoming). In 1996 and 2001, he co‐directed international Spenser conferences at Yale and Cambridge.



Jeff Dolven teaches Renaissance literature at Princeton University. His first book, Scenes of Instruction in Renaissance Romance (2007), considers relations between poetry and pedagogy at the end of the sixteenth century; he has published on Renaissance poets from Wyatt to Milton. He is currently working on a book about literary style in the sixteenth and twentieth centuries, and his own poems have appeared in the Paris Review, TLS, Yale Review, and elsewhere.



Wayne Erickson teaches English at Georgia State University. His book Mapping The Faerie Queene: Quest Structures and the World of the Poem (1996) outlines the spatial, temporal, and generic geography of The Faerie Queene. He has edited a collection of essays on the paratexts of the 1590 Faerie Queene (2005), has written brief biographies of Gabriel Harvey and William Ponsonby, and has been thinking and writing about the printing and publishing of Spenser's works for over twenty‐five years.



Andrew Escobedo, an Associate Professor at Ohio University, is the author of Nationalism and Historical Loss in Renaissance England: Foxe, Dee, Spenser, Milton (2004), which won the 2005 Nancy Dasher Prize awarded by the College English (p. xix) Association of Ohio. He is currently working on a project about personification as an expression of Renaissance ideas about the will, and was a Fellow at the National Humanities Centre, 2009–10.



Elizabeth Fowler is a General Editor of the forthcoming The Oxford Edition of the Collected Works of Edmund Spenser and the author of Literary Character (2003). She is an occasional architectural designer and is currently teaching and writing on poetry and the history of the built environment, poetry and disposition, and the pre‐modern vernacular history of constitutional thought. She lives in the Blue Ridge Mountains and is Associate Professor of English at the University of Virginia.



Roland Greene is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. He is the author of Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas (1999) and Post‐Petrarchism: Origins and Innovations of the Western Lyric Sequence (1991). With Elizabeth Fowler he co‐edited The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (1997). He is the author of numerous essays on Spenser, Shakespeare, Wyatt, and other figures in Early Modern English and continental literature.



Linda Gregerson is the Caroline Walker Bynum Distinguished University Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan, where she teaches Early Modern literature and creative writing. She is the author of The Reformation of the Subject: Spenser, Milton and the English Protestant Epic (1995) and Negative Capability: Contemporary American Poetry (2001), as well as four volumes of poetry: Fire in the Conservatory (1982), The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep (1996), Waterborne (2002), and Magnetic North (2007).



Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. He is the author of a number of works on Renaissance literature and culture, including, Shakespeare and Republicanism (2005), Shakespeare, Spenser and the Matter of Britain (2003), and Spenser's Irish Experience: Wilde Fruit and Salvage Soil (1997). He has edited, with Raymond Gillespie, The Oxford History of the Irish Book, vol. iii: The Irish Book in English, 1550–1800 (2006); The Cambridge Companion to Spenser (2001); and, with Paul Hammond, Shakespeare and Europe (2004). He is the editor of Renaissance Studies and a regular contributor to the TLS.



Elizabeth D. Harvey is Professor of English at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Ventriloquized Voices: Feminist Theory and Renaissance Texts (1992), co‐editor with Kathleen Okruhlik of Women and Reason (1992); with Katharine Eisaman Maus, Soliciting Interpretation: Literary Theory and Seventeenth‐Century English Poetry (1990); with Theresa Krier, Irigaray and Premodern Culture: Thresholds of History (2004); and editor of Sensible Flesh: On Touch in Early Modern Culture (2003).



Elizabeth Heale was a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Reading and is now an Honorary Research Fellow. She is the author of The Faerie Queene: A Reader's Guide (2nd edition, 1999), Wyatt, Surrey and Early Tudor Poetry (1998), and Autobiography and Authorship in Renaissance Verse: Chronicles of the Self (2003).



Carol V. Kaske is Professor of English Emerita at Cornell University. She is the author of 24 scholarly essays, mostly on Spenser, and three books: with John R. Clark, (p. xx) Marsilio Ficino, Three Books on Life, a Critical Edition and Translation with Introduction and Notes (1989); Spenser and Biblical Poetics (1999); and Edmund Spenser: ‘The Faerie Queene’ Book I, edited with introduction and notes (2006).



Andrew King is Lecturer in Medieval and Renaissance English at University College Cork. He is the author of The Faerie Queene and Middle English Romance: The Matter of Just Memory (2000), as well as articles and book chapters on Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, and other medieval and Early Modern topics and authors.



Clare R. Kinney is Associate Professor of English at the University of Virginia. She is the author of Strategies of Poetic Narrative: Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Eliot (1992) and has edited Ashgate Critical Essays on Women Writers in England, 1550–1700, vol. iv: Mary Wroth (2009). Her published articles include work on the Sidney circle, Spenser, Shakespeare, medieval and Renaissance romance, and the Renaissance reception of Chaucer.



Theresa Krier is Professor of English at Macalester College. She is the author of Gazing on Secret Sights: Spenser, Classical Imitation, and the Decorums of Vision (1990), and Birth Passages: Maternity and Nostalgia, Antiquity to Shakespeare (2001). She has edited Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance (1998) and, with Elizabeth D. Harvey, co‐edited Luce Irigaray and Premodern Culture: Thresholds of History (2004).



Jason Lawrence is a lecturer in English at the University of Hull. He is the author of ‘Who the Devil Taught Thee So Much Italian?’: Italian Language Learning and Literary Imitation in Early Modern England (2005), and a co‐editor of The Accession of James I: Historical and Cultural Consequences (2006). He has published essays on Samuel Daniel, Shakespeare, Spenser, Marston, Tasso, Guarini, Ariosto, and Cinthio, and is currently working on a book entitled Tasso's Afterlives in England.



Joseph Loewenstein is Professor of English and Comparative Literature, and directs the Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities at Washington University, where he has taught since 1981. He is the author of two recent books on the history of intellectual property and the rise of ‘possessive authorship’. Currently, he is one of the editors of The Oxford Edition of the Collected Works of Edmund Spenser; he is also writing a study of the material props of identity in the English Renaissance tentatively entitled ‘Accessorizing Hamlet’.



Peter Mack is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Warwick. He is the author of Renaissance Argument: Valla and Agricola in the Traditions of Rhetoric and Dialectic (1993) and of Elizabethan Rhetoric: Theory and Practice (2002). He is editor of Renaissance Rhetoric (1994) and co‐editor, with Edward Chaney, of England and the Continental Renaissance: Essays in Honour of J. B. Trapp (1990). He was editor of the journal Rhetorica 1998–2002. He is currently writing a history of Renaissance Rhetoric.



Willy Maley is Professor of Renaissance Studies at the University of Glasgow. He is the author of A Spenser Chronology (1994), Salvaging Spenser: Colonialism, Culture and Identity (1997), and Nation, State and Empire in English Renaissance Literature: Shakespeare to Milton (2003). He is editor, with Andrew Hadfield, of A View of the Present State of Ireland: From the First Published Edition (1997). He has also edited five (p. xxi) collections of essays: with Brendan Bradshaw and Andrew Hadfield, Representing Ireland: Literature and the Origins of Conflict, 1534–1660 (1993); with Bart Moore‐Gilbert and Gareth Stanton, Postcolonial Criticism (1997); with David J. Baker, British Identities and English Renaissance Literature (2002); with Andrew Murphy, Shakespeare and Scotland (2004); and with Alex Benchimol, Spheres of Influence: Intellectual and Cultural Publics from Shakespeare to Habermas (2006).



Richard A. McCabe is Fellow of Merton College, and Professor of English Language and Literature at Oxford University. He was elected FBA in 2007. He is author of Joseph Hall: A Study in Satire and Meditation (1982), The Pillars of Eternity: Time and Providence in ‘The Faerie Queene’ (1989), Incest, Drama, and Nature's Law 1550–1700 (1993), and Spenser's Monstrous Regiment: Elizabethan Ireland and the Poetics of Difference (2002/5). He has edited Edmund Spenser: The Shorter Poems for Penguin (1999). With Howard Erskine‐Hill he co‐edited Presenting Poetry: Composition, Publication, Reception (1995), and with David Womersley, Literary Milieux: Essays in Text and Context Presented to Howard Erskine‐Hill (2007).



Claire McEachern is Professor of English Literature at the University of California—Los Angeles. She is the author of The Poetics of English Nationhood, 1590–1612 (1996); editor (with Debora Shuger) of Religion and Culture in the English Renaissance (1997); The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Tragedy (2003), and a number of Shakespeare's plays, including the Arden 3 edition of Much Ado About Nothing (2005).



Tom MacFaul is Lecturer in English at Merton College, University of Oxford. He is the author of Male Friendship in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries (2007) and Poetry and Paternity in Renaissance England: Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne and Jonson (2010).



David Lee Miller is Carolina Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of South Carolina, where he directs the Centre for Digital Humanities. He is one of the five General Editors of the forthcoming The Oxford Edition of the Collected Works of Edmund Spenser. He is the author of The Poem's Two Bodies: The Poetics of the 1590 ‘Faerie Queene’ (1988) and Dreams of the Burning Child: Sacrificial Sons and the Father's Witness (2003). With Gregory Jay he co‐edited After Strange Texts: The Role of Theory in the Study of Literature (1985); with Alexander Dunlop, Approaches to Teaching Spenser's ‘Faerie Queene’ (1994); with Sharon O'Dair and Harold Weber, The Production of English Renaissance Culture (1994); and with Nina Levine, A Touch More Rare: Harry Berger, Jr. and the Arts of Interpretation (2009).



Michelle O'Callaghan is a Reader in the Department of English and American Literature at the University of Reading. She is the author of The ‘Shepheards Nation’: Jacobean Spenserians and Early Stuart Political Culture (2000), The English Wits: Literature and Sociability in Early Modern England (2007), and Thomas Middleton, Renaissance Dramatist (2009). She is co‐editor with Kate Hodgkin and Susan Wiseman of Reading the Early Modern Dream: The Terrors of the Night (2007).



Lee Piepho is Shallenberger Brown Research Professor of English Literature at Sweet Briar College. He is the editor and translator of Mantuan's Adulescentia (1989) and the author of Holofernes' Mantuan (2001), a study of Italian humanism in Early (p. xxii) Modern England. He has articles comparing the organization of Mantuan's eclogues and The Shepheardes Calender and on books newly discovered to have been in Spenser's private library. Recently he has been working on international Protestant culture in Britain and continental Europe, and has published ‘Paulus Melissus and Jacobus Falckenburgius: Two German Protestant Humanists at the Court of Queen Elizabeth’, in Sixteenth Century Studies, and ‘Making the Impossible Dream: Latin, Print, and the Marriage of Frederick V and the Princess Elizabeth’, in Reformation.



Anne Lake Prescott is Helen Goodhart Altschul Professor of English at Barnard College and also teaches at Columbia. A past President of the International Spenser Society and recently President of the Sixteenth Century Society (2007–8), she is currently on the board of the Sidney Society and the John Donne Society. She is the author of French Poets and the English Renaissance (1978), Imagining Rabelais in Renaissance England (1998), and articles on such topics as the poems of Marguerite de Navarre, the English refusal of the Gregorian calendar, John Donne and the songs of David, Elizabeth I, Thomas More's jokes, and Ben Jonson's masques. She is co‐editor with Hugh Maclean of the Norton Critical Edition of Spenser (1993); with Betty Travitsky of Female and Male Voices in Early Modern England: A Renaissance Anthology (2000); and with James Dutcher of Renaissance Historicisms: Essays in Honour of Arthur F. Kinney (2008). Her current interests include Early Modern women, almanacs, and the image of David in the Renaissance.



Claire Preston is Fellow and Lecturer in English at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge. Her books include Sir Thomas Browne: The World Proposed, co‐edited with Reid Barbour (2008); Bee (2006); Thomas Browne and the Writing of Early Modern Science (2005); and Edith Wharton's Social Register (2000); she is the General Editor of the Oxford Complete Works of Thomas Browne (in progress). She received the British Academy's Rose Mary Crawshay Prize in 2005; she was a Guggenheim Fellow (2008–9) and was awarded a British Academy Research Development Award (2008–9). She is currently writing about Early Modern literature and scientific investigation.



Syrithe Pugh is a Lecturer in English literature at the University of Aberdeen. She is the author of two monographs, Spenser and Ovid (2005) and Herrick, Fanshawe, and the Politics of Intertextuality: Classical Literature and Seventeenth‐Century Royalism (2010), and has also published various articles on intertextuality in Spenser, Sidney, Gascoigne, Jonson, Herrick, and Fanshawe. She is currently working on Spenser's use of Virgil.



Mark David Rasmussen is Professor of English at Centre College. He has edited a collection of essays, Renaissance Literature and Its Formal Engagements (2002), and is currently writing a study of poetic complaint from classical antiquity to the Renaissance.



John D. Staines is Assistant Professor of English Literature at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in the City University of New York, and he has taught Spenser at the CUNY Graduate Centre. He has also taught at the College of the Holy Cross and Earlham College. He is the author of The Tragic Histories of Mary Queen of Scots (p. xxiii) 1560–1690: Rhetoric, Passions, and Political Literature (2009) and has published articles on Spenser, Milton, Shakespeare, and Early Modern politics.



Paul D. Stegner is an Assistant Professor of English at California Polytechnic, San Luis Obispo. His articles have been published in Shakespeare Studies, Journal of English and Germanic Philology, and in Critical Essays on Shakespeare's ‘A Lover's Complaint’: Suffering Ecstasy, edited by Shirley Sharon‐Visser (2006). He is currently writing a book on the afterlives of sacramental confession in Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Donne.



Dorothy Stephens is Professor of English Literature at the University of Arkansas. She is the author of The Limits of Eroticism in Post‐Petrarchan Narrative (1998) and the editor of The Faerie Queene: Books Three and Four (2006). She received the Isabel MacCaffrey Award in 1992 and served as President of the International Spenser Society from 2006 to 2007.



Gordon Teskey, Professor of English at Harvard University, is author of Allegory and Violence (1996) and of Delirious Milton (2006), which won the Milton Society's Hanford Prize. He is editor of the Norton edition of Paradise Lost (2005).



Bart Van Es is a Fellow of St Catherine's College, and Lecturer in English Language and Literature at Oxford University. He is author of Spenser's Forms of History (2002) and editor of A Critical Companion to Spenser Studies (2006). He has written articles on Spenser, historiography, and classical reception in the early modern period. His current book project is a study of Shakespeare and the acting companies.



David Scott Wilson‐Okamura is an Associate Professor of English at East Carolina University. He is the author of Virgil in the Renaissance (2010).



Andrew Zurcher is a Fellow and Director of Studies in English at Queens' College, Cambridge. He is the author of Spenser's Legal Language: Law and Poetry in Early Modern England (2007), and Shakespeare and Law is forthcoming as an Arden Critical Companion. With Christopher Burlinson he has recently edited Edmund Spenser: Selected Letters and Other Papers (2009). He is one of the five General Editors of the forthcoming Oxford Edition of the Collected Works of Edmund Spenser.