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date: 23 October 2018

(p. x) (p. xi) Contributors

(p. x) (p. xi) Contributors

Rachelle Alterman holds the David Azrieli Chair at the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology. An urban planner and lawyer, Dr. Alterman is known internationally for her many publications on comparative land-use laws, property rights, and planning institutions. She is the founding president of the International Academic Association on Planning, Law and Property Rights.



Alex Anas obtained the Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1975. During 1975–1991 he was on the faculty at Northwestern University, and he has been professor of economics at the State University of New York at Buffalo since 1991. He is a fellow of the Regional Science Association International, and the Homer Hoyt Institute for Advanced Studies in Real Estate. His current research is focused on the development of RELU-TRAN, a computable general equilibrium microeconomic model that is suitable for testing the effects of a variety of policies and plans on urban economies.



Richard Arnott, an urban economic theorist, is Distinguished Professor of Economics at the University of California, Riverside. He has edited the Journal of Economic Geography and Regional Science and Urban Economics. His current research focuses on the economics of downtown parking and traffic congestion, and forecasting transportation, land use, and environmental quality in Los Angeles.



Timothy Bartik is a senior economist at the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Bartik's research focuses on local economic development and local labor markets. He has a forthcoming book on early childhood programs and local economic development.



Ciro Biderman is a professor in the graduate and undergraduate programs in public administration at Fundação Getulio Vargas and associate researcher at the Center for the Study of the Politics and Economics of the Public Sector. He is also a visiting fellow at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy and an associate researcher at the Regional and Economic Planning Group at the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.



(p. xii) Leah Platt Boustan is an assistant professor of Economics at UCLA and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Her research focuses on the role of internal and international migration in U.S. economic history. She holds an A.B. from Princeton University and a Ph.D. from Harvard University, both in economics.



Nancy Brooks is currently a visiting associate professor at Cornell University in the Department of City and Regional Planning, and she has also been on the economics department faculty at the University of Vermont. She earned her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1995. Her research interests are in applied urban and environmental economics. She has published in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.



Stephanie E. Chang is professor at the University of British Columbia, Canada, with a joint appointment in the School of Community and Regional Planning and the Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability. She holds a Canada Research Chair in Disaster Management and Urban Sustainability.



Hyunsun Choi, Ph.D., has focused his research, teaching, and writing on community development and urban governance related to social and commparative aspect. In particular, he is interested in sustainable development, regional governance, smart growth, u-city, housing, faith initiatives, minority community, and comparative international development. He has published a number of peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. Dr. Choi is associate professor in the Department of Public Administration, Myongji University, Seoul, Korea.



Randall Crane studies the housing, transportation, and economic development challenges of cities, such as rushed urbanization, urban design/behavior linkages, urban environmental problems, public finances, housing and transportation demographics, and the measure, meaning, and governance of sprawl. He has a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is currently professor of urban planning and acting director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at UCLA, where he is also affiliated with the Institute of the Environment and the Ziman Center for Real Estate. His book Travel by Design: The Influence of Urban Form on Travel (Oxford University Press, 2001, with Marlon Boarnet) is positioned as the reference monograph on the topic.



Casey J. Dawkins is an Associate Professor of Urban Studies and Planning and a Research Associate with the National Center for Smart Growth at the University of Maryland. His current research focuses on metropolitan housing market dynamics; the causes, consequences, and measurement of residential segregation; and the link between land-use regulation and housing affordability. He has written two (p. xiii) books and more than twenty refereed journal articles and book chapters on these topics.



Chengri Ding currently holds a position as associate dean at School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and is associate professor at urban studies and planning program, University of Maryland. He is specialized at urban economics, urban and land policies, urban planning, and China studies. He has published articles in the Journal of Urban Economics, Journal of Regional Science, Urban Studies, Environment and Planning B, Housing Policy Debates, and Land Use Policy. He has edited three books on land and housing policies, urbanization, and smart growth in China.



Kieran P. Donaghy is professor and chair of the Department of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University. He holds a Ph.D. in regional science from Cornell University. He has studied issues in transportation, land use, housing, labor markets, and the environment. Much of his recent research concerns the impacts of globalization and climate change on regions and how resource-rich regions can avoid the “resource curse.”



Randall Eberts is the president of the W. E. Upjohn Institute. His research focuses on labor market analysis and employment program evaluation, with particular emphasis on issues related to urban markets. He was a senior staff economist on the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 1991 to 1992. He was also the assistant vice president and economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University in 1978.



Matias Echanove was born in Geneva, Switzerland, studied economics at the London School of Economics and urban planning at Columbia University in New York. He is a Ph.D scholar researching information technology and participatory urban planning at the University of Tokyo. He lives in Mumbai, India, where he started the Institute of Urbanology and urbz.net, two initiatives in the fields of urban research, participatory planning, and development. He has published articles and essays on urbanism, the informal economy, unplanned settlements, participatory politics, and information technology in various international publications. His writings can be found on www.airoots.org.



Ingrid Gould Ellen is professor of urban planning and public policy at New York University's Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and codirector of the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy. Her research centers on urban social and economic policy. She is the author of Sharing America's Neighborhoods: The Prospects for Stable Racial Integration and has written numerous journal articles and book chapters related to housing policy, neighborhood change, urban growth, and school and neighborhood segregation.



(p. xiv) Genevieve Giuliano is a professor in the University of Southern California's School of Policy, Planning, and Development. She holds the Margaret and John Ferraro Chair in Effective Local Government. She is also the senior associate dean for research and technology and the director of METRANS. She conducts research on relationships between land use and transportation, transportation policy analysis, and information technology applications in transportation.



William W. Goldsmith is professor at Cornell University in the Department of City and Regional Planning. He is coauthor of Separate Societies: Poverty and Inequality in U.S. Cities (2nd ed., 2010). His research deals with race, segregation, environment, and urbanization in the United States and Latin America.



Peter Gordon is a professor in the University of Southern California's School of Policy, Planning, and Development. He was elected a fellow of the Regional Science Association International in 2009. Gordon's research interests are in applied urban economics. Gordon received the Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971.



Tracy M. Gordon is a Fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution. Her research is in state and local public finance, political economy, and urban economics. Gordon has authored reports and journal articles on state and local budgeting, local property taxes, the local initiative process, and so-called “private governments” or common interest developments. She holds a Ph.D. in public policy with a concurrent M.A. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.



Richard K. Green is the director of the Lusk Center for Real Estate at the University of Southern California. He holds the Lusk Chair in Real Estate and is professor in the School of Public Policy, Planning, and Development and the Marshall School of Business. His research addresses housing markets, housing policy, tax policy, transportation, mortgage finance, and urban growth.



Margaret Grieco holds her doctorate from the University of Oxford. She is professor of transport and society at the Transport Research Institute, Edinburgh Napier University. She was previously professor of sociology at the University of Ghana, Legon, as well as staff member of the Technical Department of the Africa Region of the World Bank. From 2003 to 2009 she was visiting salaried full professor at the Institute for African Development at Cornell University, where she taught transportation and society in Africa. She has published extensively on transport and society, including a range of major African transport issues. She is currently series editor of Ashgate's Transport and Society book series.



Zhan Guo is an assistant professor at the Wagner School of Public Service and the research director at the Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, New York University. His areas of expertise include transportation and land-use (p. xv) interactions, public transit, pedestrian behavior, and parking policy. He is currently working on topics like the mileage-based fee program in Portland, Oregon, the impact of subway maps on travel decisions in London, and residential parking policies in New York City and London.



Eric A. Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He has been a leader in the development of economic analysis of educational issues. His most recent book, Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses, describes how improved school finance policies can be used to meet our achievement goals. He is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and completed his Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.



Geoffrey J. D. Hewings is director of the Regional Economics Applications Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a professor in the Institute of Government and Public Affairs and in the Departments of Economics, Geography, Agricultural and Consumer Economics, and Urban and Regional Planning. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Washington, Seattle.



Kevin Hollenbeck is vice president and senior economist of the Upjohn Institute. His research interests include education and training program evaluation, on-the-job training, and career and technical education. He is currently principal investigator of an evaluation of the Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development sites for the U.S. Department of Labor. Dr. Hollenbeck earned his doctorate in economics from the University of Wisconsin.



Paul A. Jargowsky is a professor of public policy and administration at Rutgers-Camden, an affiliated scholar at the Urban Institute, and a senior research affiliate of the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan. His principal research focus is the spatial dimension of inequality, including the geographic concentration of poverty and residential segregation by race and class. His widely cited book, Poverty and Place: Ghettos, Barrios and the American City, is a comprehensive examination of poverty at the neighborhood level in U.S. metropolitan areas between 1970 and 1990. He received his Ph.D. in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 1991.



Lorelei Juntunen is a senior project manager at ECONorthwest. She has assessed the fiscal impacts of various growth policies (greenfield expansion and infill/redevelopment) for her public sector clients. She has a master's degree in community and regional planning and a master's degree in public administration from the University of Oregon.



Nikhil Kaza is an assistant professor of city and regional planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his postdoctoral training at the (p. xvi) National Center for Smart Growth at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is interested in reasoning with plans and urban systems under complexity.



Jae Hong Kim is an assistant professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture/Regional and Community Planning at Kansas State University. His research interests include regional economic development, land use, and urban system modeling. He received his Ph.D. in Regional Planning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne, where he was also a research assistant in the Regional Economics Applications Laboratory and the Land-use Evolution and Impact Assessment Modeling Laboratory.



Gerrit-Jan Knaap is professor of urban studies and planning and director of the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education at the University of Maryland. Knaap's research interests include the economics and politics of land-use planning, the efficacy of economic development instruments, and the impacts of environmental policy. He serves on the State of Maryland's Smart Growth Subcabinet and Sustainable Growth Commission and the Science and Technical Advisory Committee to the Chesapeake Bay Commission. Knaap earned his B.S. from Willamette University, his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Oregon, and received postdoctoral training at the University of Wisconsin—Madison, all in economics.



Amitabh Kundu teaches economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University and is currently chairperson of the Advisory Committees on Housing Start-up Index (HSUI) and Housing Shortage for the Reserve Bank of India and the Government of India. He has been visiting professor at schools including Sciences Po University in Amsterdam and the University of Kaiserslautern. Kundu has edited the books India: Urban Poverty Report and India: Social Development. Recently, he has prepared a background paper on India's economic growth, inequality and urbanization for OECD and Human Development Report (UNDP) 2009.



Philip McCann holds the University of Groningen Endowed Chair of Economic Geography. In April 2010 he was appointed as a special adviser to Johannes Hahn, the European commissioner for regional policy. He was educated at Cambridge University. He has published more than a hundred books, journal articles, and book chapters in a range of economics, regional science, geography, and engineering journals and volumes.



Virginia McConnell is professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and senior fellow at Resources for the Future. Her research has focused on environmental policy issues related to urban growth, air pollution, and transportation. Recently, she has explored market-based policies for improving land-use outcomes in exurban areas.



(p. xvii) John F. McDonald is the Gerald W. Fogelson Distinguished Chair in Real Estate at Roosevelt University in Chicago. He received the Ph.D. in economics from Yale University in 1971 and was a faculty member, department head, and dean at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 1971 to 2009. He is the author of eight books, including Urban Economics and Real Estate (with Daniel McMillen) and Urban America: Growth, Crisis, and Rebirth. He is a fellow of the Regional Science Association, International.



Daniel P. McMillen is a professor of economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has held an appointment at the university's Institute of Government and Public Affairs since 2002. His research interests are urban economics, real estate, and applied econometrics. He is the editor of the journal Regional and Urban Economics and has served on the editorial boards of five other journals. He is the coauthor (with John F. McDonald) of the textbook Urban Economics and Real Estate. He received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1987.



Terry Moore, FAICP, is a project manager at ECONorthwest, an economics and planning consulting firm. He has managed more than 500 projects in transportation and land-use planning, economic development, growth management, and market, feasibility, and fiscal analysis and has written or contributed to several books and articles on these topics.



Brendan O’Flaherty is a professor of economics at Columbia University. His work is primarily in urban economics and the economics of race. He has also been acting finance director for the City of Newark, New Jersey.



Yasuhide Okuyama, currently professor in the Graduate School of Social System Studies at the University of Kitakyushu, Japan, obtained his Ph.D. in regional planning from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the economic impact of disasters, regional economic modeling, regional science, input-output analysis, and urban and regional planning.



Katherine O’Regan is associate professor of public policy at the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University. Her research broadly focuses on issues and programs affecting the urban poor and their neighborhoods, from affordable housing and the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program, to the broader forces that may drive changes and possible consequences.



Manuel Pastor is professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. His most recent book, coauthored with Chris Benner and Martha Matsuoka, is This Could Be the Start of Something Big: How Social Movements for Regional Equity Are Reshaping Metropolitan America (Cornell University Press, 2009).



(p. xviii) Joseph Persky is professor of economics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research has focused on the distributional implications of urban and regional economic growth. With Wim Wiewel he has coauthored a book, When Corporations Leave Town, and a number of articles on sprawl. Persky has also written extensively on the logic and evaluation of state and local economic development efforts and has worked closely with several states and cities. With Daniel Felsenstein and Virginia Carlson, he coauthored Does “Trickle Down” Work? on assessing the distributional consequences of local economic development strategies. Persky has a long-standing interest in the economy of the southern United States, including a book, The Burden of Dependency, on the economic thought in that region.



Aisling Reynolds-Feighan is associate professor of transport economics at University College Dublin, Ireland. She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1989. Her research interests are in regional science and transportation, with a particular emphasis on air and road transport and their impacts on regional economies. She teaches courses in transport economics and urban and regional economics at University College Dublin.



Harry W. Richardson is the James Irvine Chair of Urban and Regional Planning in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development and a professor of economics at the University of Southern California. He is the author of thirty-one books and about 230 journal articles. His current research focuses on the economic impacts of terrorism and on regional and urban policy in Korea.



Stephen L. Ross is a professor of economics at the University of Connecticut. Professor Ross has conducted research in housing and mortgage lending discrimination, residential and school segregation, and neighborhood and peer effects. He has published in prestigious academic journals, including the Journal of Political Economy, Review of Economics and Statistics, Economic Journal, Social Problems and Journal of Urban Economics, and published the Color of Credit with MIT Press in 2002.



Richard Schramm has taught for more than forty years in business, planning, and policy programs at Columbia, Cornell, Tufts, MIT, Goddard College, and the University of Vermont. His teaching and research have focused on community economics, finance and development, socially and environmentally responsible organizations and sustainable communities, service-learning pedagogy, and campus-community partnerships.



David Sloane is professor and director of undergraduate programs in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development at the University of Southern California. His primary research and teaching interests are urban and planning history and community planning around health and safety, including criminal justice responses to street gangs.



(p. xix) Martim O. Smolka is a senior fellow and director of the Latin American and the Caribbean Program and cochair of the International Department at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. Smolka graduated from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (1971) and received an M.A. and Ph.D. in regional science from the University of Pennsylvania (1980).



Yan Song is an associate professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Song's research interests includes urban economics, land-use planning, growth management, economics of land-use regulations, urban form, impacts of urban growth, and GIS and other computer-aided planning tools. Her research projects have been supported by the National Science Foundation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.



Rahul Srivastava studied social and urban anthropology in Mumbai, Delhi, and Cambridge (UK). He taught at Wilson College, Mumbai, for seven years and worked as the first director of Partners for Urban Knowledge Action and Research (PUKAR), Mumbai, a research collective set up by Arjun Appadurai. He is cofounder of URBZ and the Institute of Urbanology. His previous publications include an ethnography of urbanized nomads around Mumbai and a novel published by Puffin, Penguin India. He is co-blogger of airoots.org, focusing on urban research and practice.



Mark Stevens is an assistant professor in the School of Community and Regional Planning at the University of British Columbia. His research focuses on the effectiveness of local government land-use planning, with particular emphasis on plan quality and implementation, public participation, and natural hazard mitigation.



Roger Vickerman is professor of European economics, University of Kent, Canterbury, and dean of the University of Kent's Brussels (Belgium) Campus. His main research interest is in the relationship between transport (especially major infrastructure), regional development, and integration in the European Union. He is the author of six books (including the textbook Principles of Transport Economics, with Emile Quinet) and more than 150 chapters, journal articles, and reports. He sits on the editorial boards of several journals in both transport and regional science and is editor in chief of Transport Policy.



Thomas Vietorisz is a professor emeritus of the New School for Social Research. He now teaches courses on international planning issues, the global market, and sustainable development as an adjunct professor in the Urban Planning Department at Columbia University and in the Department of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University.



(p. xx) Wim Wiewel is the president of Portland State University. Previously, he was the provost at the University of Baltimore and dean of the College of Business Administration at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He holds degrees in sociology and urban planning from the University of Amsterdam and a Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University.



Keith Wiley is a research associate at the Housing Assistance Council in Washington, D.C. His research interests include environmental and urban policy with a primary focus on land use and sprawl. Mr. Wiley received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in Public Policy in 2009.



Kuzey Yilmaz is assistant professor of economics at Koc University in Istanbul, Turkey. He holds a B.S. degree in electrical and electronics engineering from Bilkent University, Ankara-Turkey, and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Rochester, Rochester, New York. His research involves public finance, urban economics, and income distribution, and his publications have appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Housing Economics, and the Journal of Monetary Economics.



Xingshuo Zhao obtained her Ph.D. in Urban and Regional Planning and Design from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2010. She is currently a planner in the Administration Center of Urban-Rural Planning in the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of the People's Republic of China. Her interests include urban economics, land use, growth management, housing and land markets, urban planning and policy, and international studies.