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date: 19 February 2019

(p. ix) Contributors

(p. ix) Contributors

Rick Armstrong is Assistant Professor of English at Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York. He has presented papers at conferences of the Modern Language Association, the Midwest Modern Language Association, the American Literature Association, and the New York College English Association.



Bert Bender , Emeritus Professor of American Literature at Arizona State University, now lives in Atascadero, California. His books include Sea-Brothers: The Tradition of American Sea Fiction from Moby-Dick to the Present; The Descent of Love: Darwin and the Theory of Sexual Selection in American Fiction, 1871–1926; Evolution and “the Sex Problem”: American Narratives during the Eclipse of Darwinism; and a memoir, Catching the Ebb: Drift-Fishing for a Life in Cook Inlet.



Chris Beyers is Professor of English at Assumption College. He is the author of A History of Free Verse and numerous essays on poetry and poetics, including the chapter “Augustan American Verse” in The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature.



Stephen C. Brennan is Professor of English at Louisiana State University in Shreveport. He is coauthor of Irving Babbitt and has published numerous essays on literary naturalism in Studies in American Fiction, American Literary Realism, Dreiser Studies, and other journals. He is currently coeditor of Studies in American Naturalism.



Donna M. Campbell is Associate Professor of English at Washington State University. She is the author of Resisting Regionalism: Gender and Naturalism in American Fiction, 1885–1915, and her articles on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century authors have appeared in Studies in American Fiction, Legacy, American Literary Realism, Studies in American Naturalism, and The Cambridge Companion to Kate Chopin. Her current project is a book on American women writers of naturalism.



Jude Davies is Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of Winchester. He is author of several articles on Theodore Dreiser and edited Theodore Dreiser’s Political Writings. His previous books include Diana, A Cultural History: Gender, Race, Nation and the People’s Princess and, as coauthor, Gender, Ethnicity, and Sexuality in Contemporary American Film and, as coeditor, Issues in Americanization and Culture.



Christophe Den Tandt teaches literature in English and cultural theory at the Université Libre de Bruxelles. He is the author of The Urban Sublime in American (p. x) Literary Naturalism and of articles on U.S. literature, popular culture (music, crime fiction), and postmodernist theory. His current research focuses on the theoretical groundings of contemporary realism (literature, film, television).



Robert M. Dowling is Associate Professor of English at Central Connecticut State University. He is the author of Slumming in New York: From the Waterfront to Mythic Harlem and the two-volume Critical Companion to Eugene O’Neill: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work. His latest projects include a forthcoming critical anthology on Eugene O’Neill’s early bohemian and radical influences, coedited with Eileen Herrmann, and Eugene O’Neill: The Contemporary Reviews, a compendium of reviews of O’Neill’s books and plays, coedited with Jackson R. Bryer.



John Dudley is Associate Professor of English at the University of South Dakota. The author of A Man’s Game: Masculinity and the Anti-Aesthetics of American Literary Naturalism, he is currently working on a study of African American literature and culture between 1890 and 1928, with an emphasis on the role of music, aesthetics, and material culture in developing notions of racial identity.



Steven Frye is Professor of English at California State University, Bakersfield. He is the author of Historiography and Narrative Design in the American Romance and Understanding Cormac McCarthy, editor of Critical Insights: Poe’s Tales and Critical Insights: Poe’s Poetry, as well as the author of numerous articles on the American novel in journals such as American Studies, Studies in American Naturalism, and American Literary Realism. In addition, he is associate editor of ALN: The American Literary Naturalism Newsletter.



James R. Giles is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Northern Illinois University. He is the author of nine books and the coeditor of eight others, including The Spaces of Violence, Violence in the Contemporary American Novel: An End to Innocence, The Naturalistic Inner-City Novel in America: Encounters with the Fat Man, Approaches to Teaching the Works of Louise Erdrich (coedited), and six volumes of the Dictionary of Literary Biography (all coedited with Wanda H. Giles). He has also published approximately thirty articles and short stories, the most recent in Studies in American Naturalism and A Companion to Twentieth-Century United States Fiction.



Kevin J. Hayes , Professor of English at the University of Central Oklahoma, is the author of Stephen Crane, which forms part of the Writers and Their Work series published by Northcote House in association with the British Council. He is the editor of the Bedford edition of Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets and of Henry James: The Contemporary Reviews. For six years, he served as Bibliography Editor for Documentary Editing. For his work, the Association for Documentary Editing presented him with its Distinguished Service Award.



June Howard is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Professor of English, American Culture, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is the author of Form and History in American Literary Naturalism and, more recently, of Publishing the Family, a microhistorical study of an unusual episode in literary (p. xi) history: the serial publication in Harper’s Bazar of a collaborative novel by twelve authors, including Henry James. She is currently working on a book-length study of literary regionalism.



Jeff Jaeckle teaches courses on literature and film at Portland Community College. His essays on American literary naturalism and Hollywood film have appeared in Dreiser Studies, Quarterly Review of Film and Video, ALN: The American Literary Naturalism Newsletter, and MLA’s forthcoming Approaches to Teaching the Works of Jack London. He is the editor of the forthcoming anthology Film Dialogue.



Charles Johanningsmeier is Professor of English at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He is the author of Fiction and the American Literary Marketplace: The Role of Newspaper Syndicates, 1860–1900, as well as of numerous articles about the history and reception of fictions published in American periodicals during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.



Linda Kornasky , Professor of English at Angelo State University, has published articles on Edith Wharton, Ellen Glasgow, Kate Chopin, and other American women naturalist writers in American Literary Realism, Mississippi Quarterly, ALN: The American Literary Naturalism Newsletter, and elsewhere. She is currently working on a book about naturalism in Southern women’s fiction from the 1890s to the 1930s.



Richard Lehan , Emeritus Professor of English at UCLA, has written many books and essays on modern literary movements. His most recent books include The City in Literature, Realism and Naturalism: The Novel in an Age of Transition, and Literary Modernism and Beyond: The Extended Vision and the Realms of the Text. He is at present completing another book, tentatively entitled “Quest West,” involving the idea of romantic destiny and the transformation of American historical ideals as the country moved west.



Eric Carl Link is Professor of American literature at the University of Memphis. The author of The Vast and Terrible Drama: American Literary Naturalism in the Late Nineteenth Century and Neutral Ground: New Traditionalism and the American Romance Controversy (coauthored with G. R. Thompson), his most recent book is Understanding Philip K. Dick. He is also the founder and editor of ALN: The American Literary Naturalism Newsletter.



Carol S. Loranger is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of English Language and Literatures at Wright State University, where she has taught American literature and literary theory since 1993. She is book review editor for Studies in American Naturalism and has focused her scholarship on such groundbreaking and controversial American writers as William S. Burroughs, Thomas Pynchon, Stephen Crane, and Theodore Dreiser. She is a member of the governing committee for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and serves on its University Consortium and Lifetime Achievement subcommittees.



(p. xii) Zena Meadowsong is Assistant Professor of English Literature at Rowan University. She has contributed essays on literary naturalism to Studies in American Naturalism and Nineteenth-Century Literature and is currently at work on a book project, “Mechanization and the Making of the Modern Novel: Naturalism, Modernism, Postmodernism,” which focuses on the relationship between the historical process of mechanization and the novel form, connecting narrative experimentation in the late nineteenth-century naturalist novel to the development of twentieth-century modernism and postmodernism.



Keith Newlin is Professor and Chair of the Department of English at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. The author or editor of twelve books, recent volumes include Hamlin Garland, A Life and, as editor, A Summer to Be, A Memoir by the Daughter of Hamlin Garland and A Theodore Dreiser Encyclopedia. At present he is the coeditor of Studies in American Naturalism.



Mary E. Papke is Professor of English at the University of Tennessee. She is the author of Verging on the Abyss: The Social Fiction of Kate Chopin and Edith Wharton and Susan Glaspell: A Research and Production Sourcebook, and the editor of Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. In addition, she has published essays on feminist theory, postmodern women writers, the unpublished drama of Evelyn Scott, the political theatre of Sean O’Casey, and Marxist literary criticism in early twentieth-century America, among other topics.



Donald Pizer , Pierce Butler Professor of English Emeritus at Tulane University, has published widely on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature. His recent books include American Naturalism and the Jews: Garland, Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather and editions of Hamlin Garland’s early radical writing and of Dreiser’s interviews and letters.



Jeanne Campbell Reesman is Professor of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio, where she has also served as Graduate Dean and Director of English, Classics, Philosophy and Communication. She has published numerous monographs, collections, textbooks, and editions from Oxford, Macmillan, Stanford, University of Pennsylvania, Norton, and Éditions Phébus (Paris), among them her critical biography, Jack London’s Racial Lives, and Jack London, Photographer, coedited with Sara S. Hodson and Philip Adam, a collection of London’s historic photographs.



Ian F. Roberts teaches nineteenth-century literature, literary theory, and literature and science at Missouri Western State University. He also chairs the Literature and Science Area for the American Culture Association.



Gina M. Rossetti is Associate Professor of English at Saint Xavier University in Chicago, where she teaches late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature. She is the author of Imagining the Primitive in Naturalist and Modernist Literature as well as the author of “It’s a Family Affair: Nativism and Ethnic Panic in Jack London’s The Valley of the Moon,” which will appear in MLA’s Approaches to (p. xiii) Teaching the Works of Jack London. She is also a member of the advisory board for the Jack London Society.



Gary Scharnhorst is Distinguished Professor of English at the University of New Mexico, the author or editor of more than thirty-five books, a five-time recipient of Fulbright teaching fellowships to Germany, and editor of American Literary Realism and editor in alternating years of American Literary Scholarship.



Jeff P. Turpin is a literary Darwinist who recently received his Ph.D. in English from the University of Texas at San Antonio. His minor concentrations include cognitive and evolutionary psychologies, modernism, and minority literature. He resides in rural Texas and currently works as a self-employed archeologist.



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