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date: 17 December 2018

(p. ix) Acknowledgments

(p. ix) Acknowledgments

Collaboration among many people, across many continents and disciplines, made this volume possible. First and deepest thanks go to my editors at Oxford University Press: to Shannon McLachlan, who responded with enthusiasm to my query, “why not a handbook on global modernism?” She has offered exemplary support in this and other projects over the years, and I have tremendous respect for her insight and professionalism. And many thanks as well to Brendan O’Neill, a first responder of the first order. My assistant editor, Matt Eatough, was invaluable to the long process of shaping this volume: his keen eye for argument was appreciated by many contributors. I am also grateful to the many friends and colleagues who steered me toward possible contributors as I began to piece this project together. Kevin Dettmar, Jed Esty, Gayle Rogers, and Paul Saint-Amour were good enough to read and comment on my introduction and to listen to my ideas, complaints, and questions over drinks on many happy occasions. Much of the intellectual energy found in this volume was generated out of the Tenth Annual Conference of the Modernist Studies Association, or MSAX, which drew a large crowd of scholars to Nashville to exchange papers under the rubric of Modernism and Global Media. That conference would not have come together without the labors of my co-organizer, Paul Young, and our conference assistants, Derrick Spires and Amanda Hagood. At the last stages of production, Elizabeth Barnett, more than up to proof, stepped in to provide expert help with the final grooming of the copyedited manuscript; may her infant daughter dream of Turkish modernism and other permutations of modernism across the globe. An extract from Richard Aldington’s letter to T. S. Eliot (held at Houghton Library, Harvard University) is reproduced here by kind permission of Richard Aldington’s Estate c/o Rosica Colin Limited, London. An earlier version of Jahan Ramazani’s “Poetry, Modernity, Globalization” was published in his A Transnational Poetics (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009) and is reprinted with kind permission of the University of Chicago Press. (p. x)