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date: 18 April 2019

(p. ix) List of Contributors

(p. ix) List of Contributors

Gretchen Arnold is a faculty member in Women’s and Gender Studies at St. Louis University. Her research interests include social movements and violence against women. Her work appears in Law & Social Inquiry and Violence Against Women.



Pamela Aronson is an Associate Professor at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, where she conducts research on young women’s identities and attitudes toward feminism, career development, the experiences of non-traditional college students, and the challenges facing college students who graduated during the recession. She has published in Gender & Society and Journal of Youth Studies.



Lee Ann Banaszak is Professor of Political Science and Women’s Studies at The Pennsylvania State University. She has written extensively on women’s movements in the United States and Europe and on public opinion toward feminism; she is the author of Why Movements Succeed and Fail and The Women’s Movement Inside and Outside the State.



Joyce M. Bell is an Associate Professor and Don A. Martindale Endowed Chair of Sociology at the University of Minnesota and author of The Black Power Movement and American Social Work. Her research focuses on race, work and organizations, and social movements.



Kathleen Blee is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research at the University of Pittsburgh. Her award-winning work focuses on women’s activism in extreme right-wing and racial movements. Her recent publications include Understanding Racist Activism: Theory, Methods, and Research and Democracy in the Making: How Activist Groups Form.



Eileen Boris is the Hull Professor and Distinguished Professor of Feminist Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of the prize-winning books Home to Work: Motherhood and the Politics of Industrial Homework in the United States and, with Jennifer Klein, Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State.



Ian Breckenridge-Jackson is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Riverside, specializing in gender, race, and class inequalities and social movements. His work appears in Politics, Groups, and Identities and Policy Matters. He is also a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow.



(p. x) Nancy Burns is Warren E. Miller Collegiate Professor of Political Science, Chair of the Department of Political Science, and Research Professor in the Center for Political Studies at the University of Michigan. Her specializations include gender, race, political participation, public opinion, and intergovernmental relations in the American context. Her book, The Private Roots of Public Action: Gender, Equality, and Political Participation, won the Victoria Schuck Award from the American Political Science Association.



Sherry Cable is Professor of Sociology at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. She studies environmental movements and environmental policy. She wrote Sustainable Failures: Environmental Policy and Democracy in a Petro-dependent World. Her research won the Allan Schnaiberg Outstanding Research Award from the American Sociological Association’s Environment and Technology Section.



Elyse Claxton is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at Florida State University. She conducts research in the areas of sociology of media, gender, and social movements, exploring how the feminist movement influences magazines targeting teenage girls.



Cheryl Cooky is an Associate Professor in the American Studies program at Purdue University and Past President of the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport. Her research investigates gender and sports. She recently co-authored, “ ‘It’s Dude Time!’: A Quarter Century of Excluding Women’s Sports in Televised News and Highlight Shows” in the journal Communication & Sport. The article has been accessed over 20,000 times since its publication.



Anne N. Costain is Professor Emerita of Political Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She is a scholar of women’s activism, social movement politics, and non-violence as a social movement tactic. She is author of Inviting Women’s Rebellion: A Political Process Interpretation of the Women’s Movement.



W. Douglas Costain is Senior Instructor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His research interests are social movements and environmental politics. He has published his work in journals including Policy Studies, Polity, and Congress and the Presidency.



Alison Dahl Crossley is the Associate Director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University, and her research and writing focus on feminism, social movement continuity, and student activism. Her soon-to-be published book is Finding Feminism: Millennial Activists and the Unfinished Gender Revolution.



Rachel L. Einwohner is Professor of Sociology at Purdue University, where she also holds a courtesy appointment in Political Sociology and affiliations with the Jewish Studies Program and the Center for Research on Diversity and Inclusion. Her extensive scholarship appears in a variety of journals, including the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, and Social Problems. Her work focuses on the dynamics of protest and resistance, protest effectiveness, and gender and other identities.



(p. xi) Allison Louise Elias is a visiting professor at the Cornell School of Industrial and Labor Relations, where she is researching gender, work, and feminism for a forthcoming book on women’s upward mobility in corporate America.



Rose Ernst is Associate Professor of Political Science at Seattle University, where she researches U.S. politics, social movements, and structural racism. She is author of The Price of Progressive Politics: The Welfare Rights Movement in an Era of Colorblind Racism.



Kathleen M. Fallon is a Professor of Sociology at Stony Brook University. Her interests lie at the intersection of political sociology, international development, and gender studies. She has published Democracy and the Rise of Women’s Movements in Sub-Saharan Africa.



Mary Margaret Fonow is the Norton and Ramsey Professor of Social Transformation and Professor of Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University. She is the author of numerous publications on union feminism, feminist methodology, and transformational leadership, including, with Suzanne Franzway, Making Feminist Politics: Transnational Alliances between Women and Labor.



Suzanne Franzway is Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at the University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. She has published widely on social change and gender equality, including her co-authored books, Making Feminist Politics: Transnational Alliances between Women and Labor and Challenging Knowledge, Sex and Power: Gender, Work and Engineering.



Melinda Goldner is Professor of Sociology at Union College and studies health care and health care social movements. She has published in a variety of journals, including Sociology of Health & Illness and Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change.



Kristin A. Goss is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. She is author of The Paradox of Gender Equality: How American Women’s Groups Gained and Lost Their Public Voice and (with Philip J. Cook) The Gun Debate: What Everyone Needs to Know.



Brittany N. Hearne is a sociology graduate student at Vanderbilt University. Her research interests include race, gender, family, education, and mental health.



Heather McKee Hurwitz is a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology and the Athena Center for Leadership Studies at Barnard College, Columbia University. She works in the areas of social movements, global studies, and gender and feminism studies. Her published scholarship appears in Information, Communication, and Society and Sociology Compass.



Ashley Jardina is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Duke University and her research investigates racial attitudes, the development of group identities, and how these influence political behavior. She has published in Political Psychology and the Annual Review of Political Science.



(p. xii) Marla H. Kohlman is a Professor of Sociology at Kenyon College with published work appearing in Advances in Gender Research and The Handbook of Feminist Research, Second Edition. Her scholarship has focused upon intersectionality and sexual harassment in the US labor market and the military.



Kelsy Kretschmer is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Oregon State University, where her research and teaching focus on social movements and organizations. She has published her work in Sociological Forum, Sociological Perspectives, and the American Behavioral Scientist.



Reid J. Leamaster is a faculty member at Glendale Community College (Arizona) whose research focuses on resistance and compliance to gender traditionalism in religion.



Lisa Leitz is an Assistant Professor of Peace Studies and Sociology at Chapman University and the author of Fighting for Peace: Veterans and Military Families in the Anti-Iraq War Movement, which won the American Sociological Association Peace, War, and Social Conflict Section’s 2014 Outstanding Book Award.



Rachel E. Luft is Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Anthropology, Sociology, and Social Work at Seattle University. Her research examines race and gender intersectionality in the context of social movements and disasters. Her work appears in Feminist Formations, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and American Quarterly.



Christine Mallinson is Associate Professor of Language, Literacy, and Culture and Affiliate Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Her work investigates language in its social context. She has co-authored two recent volumes, Understanding English Language Variation in U.S. Schools and We Do Language: English Language Variation in the Secondary English Classroom.



Jane Mansbridge is the Charles F. Adams Professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and among her many significant publications she is author of the award-winning Why We Lost the ERA, a study of second wave feminism and the counter mobilization against it.



Holly J. McCammon is Professor of Sociology at Vanderbilt University with secondary appointments in Law and Human and Organizational Development. Her research centers on women’s activism, including use of litigation as a social movement strategy. She has published widely on women’s collective action, including her book The U.S. Women’s Jury Movements and Strategic Adaptation: A More Just Verdict.



Corrine M. McConnaughy is Associate Professor of Political Science at George Washington University. Her research focuses on how political identities including race, gender, and ethnicity influence public opinion and political institutions in the United States. She has published in a range of journals and is author of The Woman Suffrage Movement in America: A Reassessment.



(p. xiii) Julisa McCoy is a graduate student in Sociology at the University of California, Riverside with research interests in reproductive justice and family planning funding.



David S. Meyer is Professor of Sociology and Political Science at the University of California, Irvine. He is a scholar of social movements, public policy, peace and war, and social justice. In 2007, in addition to his other extensive publications, he authored The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America.



Shae Miller is a Lecturer in the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at California State University, Long Beach.



Mary Pardo is a Professor in the Department of Chicana/o Studies at California State University, Northridge. Her book, Mexican American Women Activists: Identity and Resistance in Two Los Angeles Communities, received the Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award from the Latina/o Section of the American Sociological Association.



Janelle M. Pham is a doctoral candidate in Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research examines how institutional context informs the sexual behavior of individuals.



Benjamin Pratt is a doctoral student in the Organizational Behavior/Human Resource Management Program at Purdue University. He is interested in the effects of work redesign on status, organizational identity and image, and work-life balance among “blue-collar” workers.



Heidi E. Rademacher is a doctoral candidate in the Sociology Department at Stony Brook University with research interests in transnational women’s movements, international human rights campaigns, and globalization.



Ellen Reese is Professor of Sociology and Chair of Labor Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is author of Backlash Against Welfare Mothers: Past and Present. Her research specializations include: gender, race, and class inequalities, political sociology, welfare state development, and social movements.



Jo Reger is a Professor of Sociology and the Director of Women and Gender Studies at Oakland University in Michigan and the author of numerous works, including Everywhere and Nowhere: Contemporary Feminism in the United States. She is a scholar of social movements, gender, and theory.



Deana A. Rohlinger is a Professor of Sociology at Florida State University. She studies mass media, political participation, and politics in America. Her recent book is titled Abortion Politics, Mass Media, and Social Movements in America.



Benita Roth is Professor of Sociology, History, and Women’s Studies at the State University of New York, Binghamton. Her work focuses on gender, race and ethnicity, class, and sexuality in social protest, as evidenced by her latest book, The Life and (p. xiv) Death of ACT UP/LA: Anti-AIDS Organizing in Los Angeles from the 1980s to the 2000s (Cambridge University Press).



Leila J. Rupp is Distinguished Professor of Feminist Studies and Interim Dean of Social Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has published extensively on women’s movements, sexualities, and transnational history. Her award-winning work includes Sapphistries: A Global History of Love between Women and (with Verta Taylor) Drag Queens at the 801 Cabaret.



Tiffany Sanford-Jenson is an Associate Professor of Criminology in the Sociology and Social Work Department at Brigham Young University-Idaho. Her research includes the topics of sexual assault, violent victimization, and deviance within institutions. She is author of Soldier Rape, Our Own Worst Enemy: The Effects of Deployment, Sex Ratios, and Military Branch on the Sexual Assault of Active Duty Women in the U.S. Military.



Beth E. Schneider is currently Chair of the Department of Sociology and the Director of the McNair Scholars Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has published extensively and her research received the American Sociological Association’s Sociologists’ AIDS Network Career Contributions to the Sociology of AIDS Award.



Ronnee Schreiber is Professor and Chair of Political Science at San Diego State University. She has published widely on conservative women and politics, and her book, Righting Feminism: Conservative Women and American Politics, has been reviewed extensively.



Marie B. Skoczylas is a Visiting Instructor in the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies program at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests include feminist, queer, and anarchist theories and practices.



Suzanne Staggenborg is Professor of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh and the author of numerous works on the dynamics of social movements, including the women’s movement and abortion politics. Her scholarship can be found in top journals such as the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Mobilization, Gender & Society, and Social Problems.



Kayla Stover is a doctoral candidate in the Sociology Department at the University of Tennessee. She conducts research in the area of environmental policy, politics, and justice.



Verta Taylor is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and affiliated faculty member in Feminist Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of numerous publications on women’s and LGBT movements and recipient of the American Sociological Association’s Jessie Bernard Award and the McCarthy Award for her scholarship on social movements. Her prize-winning research includes (with Leila Rupp) Survival in the Doldrums: The American Women’s Rights Movement, 1945 to the 1960s and Drag Queens at the 801 Carbaret.



(p. xv) Aisha A. Upton is a doctoral candidate at the University of Minnesota. She researches race and gender, social movements, organizations, civil society, and civic participation.



Nella Van Dyke is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Merced. Her research focuses on social movements and hate crime with studies of social movement coalitions, college student protest, and the mobilizing effect of threat. Her work has been published in leading journals, including the American Sociological Review, Social Forces, and Social Problems.



Anne Whitesell is a dual PhD candidate in Political Science (American politics) and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Her work considers the political representation of welfare recipients.



Nancy Whittier is Sophia Smith Professor of Sociology at Smith College and the author of numerous scholarly publications, including The Politics of Child Sexual Abuse: Emotion, Social Movements, and the State. Her forthcoming book is titled Strange Bedfellows: Feminists, Conservatives, and Sexual Violence (in press, Oxford University Press).



Nicole Yadon is a PhD candidate in Political Science at the University of Michigan. Her research interests include race and gender politics, public opinion, and political behavior.



Elizabeth Yates is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh. Her scholarship centers on social movements, gender in social movements, and conservative activism.



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