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The Moral Relevance of the Distinction Between Domesticated and Wild Animals  

Clare Palmer

Print publication date:
Oct 2011
Online publication date:
May 2012

...“wild” or “non-domesticated” alternative existence. 29 The deep, fundamental ways in which domestication brings beings into existence in certain ways makes domestication stand out from any other form of social contract. The idea of the domesticated animal contract, then, is too deeply problematic to accept. However, one need not adopt contract language to accept the claim that domestication changes humans’ moral relationship to animals. Many of the factors that feature in the domesticated animal contract—in particular the ways in which domestication changes animals’...

Animal Domestications  

Alan K. Outram

Print publication date:
Apr 2014
Online publication date:
Oct 2013

...starts by examining what is meant by ‘domestication’ with respect to animals, then there is a discussion of the key ways of recognizing it in the archaeological record. The chapter then focuses on some case studies of animal domestication that relate specifically to hunter-gatherer innovation rather than the subsequent domestication of animals by early cereal agriculturalists. Defining Animal Domestication To ‘domesticate’ means ‘to accustom (an animal) to live under the care and near the habitations of man; to tame or bring under control…’ (OED Online 2009)...

Domesticating Animals in Africa  

Diane Gifford-Gonzalez and Olivier Hanotte

Print publication date:
Jul 2013
Online publication date:
Sep 2013

...-D. , Guilaine, J. , Debue, K. , Hye, L. , and Gérard, P. (2004). Early taming of the cat in Cyprus. Science 304: 259. Wayne, R. K. , Leonard, J. A. , and Vilà, C. (2006). Genetic analysis of dog domestication. In M. A. Zeder , D. G. Bradley , E. Emshwiller , and B. D. Smith (eds), Documenting Domestication: New Genetic and Archaeological Paradigms . Berkeley: University of California ...

Early Farming and Domestication  

Graeme Barker

Print publication date:
Mar 2009
Online publication date:
Sep 2012

... their systems of foraging with practices involving new relationships with animals and plants (falconry, wolf domestication, forest-burning, animal and plant translocation, ‘dooryard horticulture’), and had the technologies to make open-sea voyages over distances of at least 150km in South-East Asia, this suggests that the theory put forward by Bahn 1978 , and then severely criticized by White 1989 , that some Eurasian reindeer-hunters might have tamed and ridden horses may not be so far-fetched after all given that, like their contemporaries in China and the Near...

The Emergence and Spread of Herding in Northern Africa  

Savino di Lernia

Print publication date:
Jul 2013
Online publication date:
Sep 2013

...discrete genetic populations, separated around 22,000 years ago, suggesting separate domestication processes and an African origin in the eastern Sahara ( Hanotte et al. 2002 ). Although the genetic influence of other centres of cattle domestication in modern breeds was underlined ( Hanotte et al. 2002 : 339), along with the possibility that the geographical relationships and timing of domestication could easily overlap (cf. Beja-Pereira et al. 2006 for Europe), proponents...

Animals as Sentient Commodities  

Rhoda Wilkie

Print publication date:
Apr 2017
Online publication date:
Aug 2015

...routinely work with. Given that the perceived status of animals is unstable in practice, this can disrupt the mutually exclusive categorizations of domesticated animals as either “livestock” or “pets.” Such classificatory labels not only delimit the species’ primary function but also culturally convey how such animals should, ideally, be perceived and behaved toward. 74 For example, as domesticated species have been tamed and trained to fulfill valuable roles in human society, they are typically perceived as “good animals” and enjoy an elevated status in the “sociozoologic...

Archaeozoology  

Juliet Clutton-Brock

Print publication date:
Apr 2017
Online publication date:
Jun 2014

...of Ferdinand Keller’s book on the archaeology of the lake dwellings of Switzerland, which was published in London in 1878. 7 In view of what is now known about the worldwide domestication of the pig, Rütimeyer’s identifications are of historical interest: 8 The pig is another domestic animal of which several races were found very early. Yet, as far as I can make out, it did not occur tame in the oldest settlements of the stone age; but, on the contrary, there were two races of wild swine, which might almost be called species—one the wild boar of the present day...

Animals and Social Relations  

Arkadiusz Marciniak and Joshua Pollard

Print publication date:
Mar 2015
Online publication date:
Jul 2014

...ng most closely with the authors’ specialist knowledge, namely northern and north-western Europe. Domesticated and non-domesticated animals in the European Neolithic The emergence of Neolithic lifestyles was closely associated with new skills and technologies, with animal husbandry arguably one of the most crucial. Neither sheep nor goats had wild ancestors in temperate Europe ( Glass 1991 , 30), aDNA evidence pointing to their initial domestication, along with that of cattle and pig, in the Neolithic of the northern Near East ( Bollongino and Burger 2007...

Pets  

Michael MacKinnon

Print publication date:
Aug 2014
Online publication date:
Mar 2014

...care, treatment, or ‘domestication’ of such animals among these cases. Tamed ‘Pet’ Wildlife and Exotics Tamed wild animals are occasionally cited as ‘pets’ among the ancient sources. Included in this category are varieties of hares, rabbits, deer, gazelles, antelopes, and related small ungulates, as well as more exotic or ferocious animals including monkeys, lions, tigers, leopards, elephants, and bears. The dividing line distinguishing any of these as ‘pets’ is subjective; much depends on the docility of the animal. Domestication or ‘taming’ of wild game is...

Archaeozoological techniques and protocols for elaborating scenarios of early colonization and Neolithization of Cyprus  

Jean-Denis Vigne

Print publication date:
Mar 2017
Online publication date:
Apr 2017

...diminution, at a time when the sex ratio was definitely unbalanced. This scenario indicates that the Cypriot PPNB villagers were experiencing local domestication, exactly as their contemporaneous continental counterparts, except that they did it starting from feral goats. This is important information about the mechanism and rhythm of the domestication processes. Figure 5.2 The process of re-domestication of the feral goat at Shillourokambos, after Vigne (2011) : A. Histograms of distribution of the densities and mixture analyses for two measurements...

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