Classical Studies

Editor in Chief | Editorial Board | Volume Editors | Digital Collections


The Classical Studies area of OHO aims to offer high-quality scholarly coverage of all major fields and sub-fields of contemporary research into Classical and ancient Mediterranean culture. While Greco-Roman language, literature, history, religion and philosophy continue to be dominant areas of scholarly interest which are fully represented in this module, every effort is also made to cover dynamic growth-areas of research, especially in material culture, epigraphy and papyrology, art and architecture, the sciences, engineering and technology, reception studies, and gender studies. Interaction between these various disciplines is reflected in the overt emphasis on interdisciplinary coverage within the contributions that the module commissions. The overall aim is to provide a state-of-the art research tool which, because it is produced on-line, can be updated to reflect ongoing developments within Classical studies.

Editor in Chief, Gareth Williams, discusses the interdisciplinary nature of OHO: Classical Studies.


Editor in Chief

Gareth Williams has a BA in Classics, Cambridge 1983; a PhD in Classics, Cambridge 1990 (thesis on Ovid’s exilic poetry). His main areas of research and publication are in Latin literature and philosophy. He is the author of four books, two on Ovid’s exilic poetry, two on the first-century philosopher and politician Seneca; his most recent book is The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca’s Natural Questions, published by OUP in 2012. He has taught Classics at Columbia University since 1992.

OUP: Why did you become involved with this project?

Williams: My involvement in Oxford Handbooks Online was motivated above all by the opportunity that I saw for (a) the development of a valuable collection of state-of-the-art research articles across the breadth of classical studies, and (b) the capability to supplement, modify and revise those contributions over time because of the evolving electronic format in which they would be assembled. In this respect the OHO promises to be a truly dynamic enterprise which is at the cutting edge of scholarship while also retaining continuity with established knowledge and traditional research methodologies.

OUP: What excites you most about Oxford Handbooks Online: Scholarly Research Reviews?

Williams: One of the most exciting aspects of the project is its flexibility and lack of static parameters: additions and updates can always be made to subject-areas as well as to subfields within given volumes, so that the OHO definition of what constitutes classical study is itself open-minded, creative and adaptable to the shifting contours of the discipline.

OUP: How does the editorial board help you to meet the challenge of maintaining balanced and up-to-date coverage of the discipline?

Williams: A board of senior editors assists the editor in chief in reflecting on possible additions that could be made to existing volumes in classical studies, in identifying suitable contributors for articles, and in determining the future direction of the project. It is a privilege to work closely with a distinguished team of experts drawn from across the full spectrum of contemporary classical studies; and that collective effort also offers a model of collaborative teamwork in an era when interdisciplinary approaches are transforming the direction and relevance of classical study.


Learn more about Williams' involvement in the project.


Editorial Board

Senior Editors
Andrew Monson
New York University
Emily Greenwood
Yale University
Verity Platt
Cornell University

Advisory Editor
Brooke Holmes
Princeton University

Volume Editors

Roger S. Bagnall
New York University
The Oxford Handbook of Papyrology

Peter Fibiger Bang
University of Copenhagen
The Oxford Handbook of the State in the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean

Alessandro Barchiesi
University of Siena at Arezzo; Stanford University
The Oxford Handbook of Roman Studies

Kathryn Bosher
Northwestern University
The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas

George Boys-Stones
Durham University
The Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies

Christer Bruun
University of Toronto
The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy

Brian Campbell
Queen's University Belfast
The Oxford Handbook of Warfare in the Classical World

Gordon Lindsay Campbell
National University of Maynooth
The Oxford Handbook of Animals in Classical Thought and Life

Eric H. Cline
George Washington University
The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean

Robin Cormack
Courtauld Institute of Art
The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies

Jonathan Edmondson
York University (Toronto)
The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy

Judith Evans Grubbs
Emory University
The Oxford Handbook of Childhood and Education in the Classical World

Michael Fontaine
Cornell University
The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Comedy
Elise A. Friedland
George Washington University
The Oxford Handbook of Roman Sculpture

Elaine K. Gazda
University of Michigan
The Oxford Handbook of Roman Sculpture

Barbara Graziosi
Durham University
The Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies

John F. Haldon
Princeton University
The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies

Ralph Hexter
University of California, Davis
The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Latin Literature

Catherine Hezser
University of London
The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Daily Life in Roman Palestine

Elizabeth Jeffreys
University of Oxford
The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies

Scott Fitzgerald Johnson
Georgetown University
The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity

Sarah Knight
Leicester University
The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Latin

Fiona Macintosh
University of Oxford
The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas

Clemente Marconi
New York University
The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Art and Architecture

Justine McConnell
University of Oxford
The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas

William E. Metcalf
Yale University
The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage
John Peter Oleson
University of Victoria
The Oxford Handbook of Engineering and Technology in the Classical World

Tim Parkin
University of Manchester
The Oxford Handbook of Childhood and Education in the Classical World

Michael Peachin
New York University
The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World

Karen Radner
University College London
The Oxford Handbook of Cuneiform Culture

Patrice Rankine
Hope University
The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas

Eleanor Robson
University of Cambridge
The Oxford Handbook of Cuneiform Culture

Adele C. Scafuro
Brown University
The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Comedy

Walter Scheidel
Stanford University
The Oxford Handbook of the State in the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean
The Oxford Handbook of Roman Studies

Melanie Grunow Sobocinski
University of Michigan-Dearborn
The Oxford Handbook of Roman Sculpture

Stefan Tilg
University of Zurich
The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Latin

David Townsend
University of Toronto
The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Latin Literature

Lawrence A. Tritle
Loyola Marymount University
The Oxford Handbook of Warfare in the Classical World

Phiroze Vasunia
University of Reading
The Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies
 

Digital Collections

A specially curated collection of peer-reviewed articles that discuss cutting-edge research and ensure comprehensive and timely coverage of ever-expanding disciplines.

Ecphrasis
Michael Squire
King’s College London

Greek Literature in Contemporary Political Theory and Thought
Demetra Kasimis
California State University, Long Beach
Latin Didactic, Scientific, and Technical Literature
Courtney Roby
Cornell University

Naucratis
Myrto Malouta
Ionian University

Philology and Greek Literature
Sean Gurd
The Natural World in Greek Literature and Philosophy
Mark Payne
University of Chicago

The Ptolemaic Army
Christelle Fischer-Bovet
USC

Time, Tense, and Temporality in Ancient Greek Historiography
Jonas Grethlein
Heidelberg University
 

We want to hear from you.
Oxford Handbooks Online is a partnership between the publisher and the academic community, and we invite your questions about the content. Please feel welcome to email Adina Berk, our Classical Studies editor, with comments, suggestions, or questions.