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Blending Genres and Crossing Audiences: and the Future of Literary Fiction  

Karin E. Westman

Print publication date:
Mar 2011
Online publication date:
Sep 2012
This article describes J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series' (1997–2007) generic hybridity, focusing on elements of the school story, bildungsroman, and fantasy in the texts. It ... More

A Cross-Written Harlem Renaissance: Langston Hughes’s  

Katharine Capshaw Smith

Print publication date:
Mar 2011
Online publication date:
Sep 2012
This article opens up the literary, aesthetic, and cultural contexts of the Harlem Renaissance by discussing how children were imagined within this movement and by examining in particular ... More

A Daughter of the House: Discourses of Adoption in L. M. Montgomery’s  

Mavis Reimer

Print publication date:
Mar 2011
Online publication date:
Sep 2012
This article reviews the documentary evidence against Lucy Maud Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables (1908) to argue that the figure of the adopted (white, Canadian) child—and the British ... More

Happily Ever After: , Second-Wave Feminism, and 1970s American Children’s Culture  

Leslie Paris

Print publication date:
Mar 2011
Online publication date:
Sep 2012
This article argues that the example of the enormously popular Free to Be . . . You and Me (1972) points to the ways in which childhood became a utopian space of liberation in large part. ... More

Paradise Refigured: Innocence and Experience in  

Naomi Wood

Print publication date:
Mar 2011
Online publication date:
Sep 2012
This article argues that through a radical retelling of the myth of the fall from Paradise in the His Dark Materials trilogy (1995–2000), Philip Pullman replaces an old mythology of ... More

Randall Jarrell’s The Bat-Poet: Poets, Children, and Readers in an Age of Prose  

Richard Flynn

Print publication date:
Mar 2011
Online publication date:
Sep 2012
This article addresses how The Bat-Poet (1964) may be used to explore the rich traditions of American children's poetry within a larger literary history encompassing both fiction and ... More

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