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Aelius Donatus and His Commentary on Terence’s Comedies  

Chrysanthi Demetriou

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
The chapter begins with a short overview of the history, structure, and themes of the commentary on Terence composed by the grammarian Aelius Donatus. The main discussion explores the ... More

Appendices  

Eftychia Bathrellou

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
The year 1973 saw the publication of the first comprehensive collection of comic papyri, Colin Austin's Comicorum Graecorum Fragmenta in Papyris Reperta (CGFP). This appendix summarizes ... More

Aristophanes1  

Bernhard Zimmermann

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter offers an overview of Aristophanes based on current research. Specific features of Aristophanes’s language, his metrics, and the structures of his comedies are analyzed; these ... More

The Beginnings of Roman Comedy  

Peter G. McC. Brown

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter examines the early development of ludi scaenici (dramatic festivals) at Rome and the introduction there of fabulae palliatae (the type of drama now known as Roman comedy) by ... More

Between Two Paradigms: Plautus  

Michael Fontaine

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter discusses the twenty-one Roman comedies of T. Maccius Plautus in the light of two predominantly competing modern paradigms, here called the "Saturnalian" and the ... More

Comedy  

David Konstan

Print publication date:
Aug 2009
Online publication date:
Sep 2012
Aristotle remarks in The Parts of Animals that ‘man is the only animal that laughs’, and comedy, the object of which is to produce laughter, is a particularly human phenomenon. As such, it ... More

Comedy in the Fourth Century I: Mythological Burlesques  

Ioannis M. Konstantakos

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
Comedies burlesquing traditional Greek mythical stories flourished in the Athenian theater especially between 400 and 340 BCE. Antecedents are found already in fifth-century drama ... More

Comedy in the Fourth Century II: Politics and Domesticity  

Jeffrey Henderson

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter traces the development of political and domestic themes and types of comedy in the fourth century from their origins in the fifth and finds both variety and continuity, though ... More

Comedy in the Late Fourth and Early Third Centuries bce  

Adele C. Scafuro

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter discusses trends in the production of fourth-century comedies (revivals, prizes for comic actors), and considers these and other trends through the perspective of an imaginary ... More

Crossing Conceptual Worlds: Greek Comedy and Philosophy  

David Konstan

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
Philosophers are a natural object of fun and parody, and ancient Greek comedy took full advantage of the possibilities for spoofing their utopian projects, technical language, scientific ... More

Crossing Genres: Comedy, Tragedy, and Satyr Play  

Johanna Hanink

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter considers the similarities, differences, and points of engagement between the three main dramatic genres of classical Athens: comedy, tragedy, and satyr play. After an ... More

The Diffusion of Comedy from the Age of Alexander to the Beginning of the Roman Empire1  

Brigitte Le Guen

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
The nature of our sources does not allow us to reconstruct the spread of comedy from the conquests of Alexander the Great to the beginning of the Roman Empire, either chronologically or ... More

Dionysiac Festivals in Athens and the Financing of Comic Performances  

Andronike Makres

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter discusses the institution of choregia for comedy in Classical Athens performed at the City Dionysia, the Lenaea, and the Dionysia held in the Attic demes. The choregia was ... More

Festivals, Producers, Theatrical Spaces, and Records  

George Fredric Franko

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter considers how festivals, producers, and theatrical spaces influenced Roman comedy in the time of Plautus and Terence (ca. 210-160 BCE). Although the extant scripts and ... More

Film Studies  

Pantelis Michelakis

Print publication date:
Aug 2009
Online publication date:
Sep 2012
Film studies provides the ideal field for further reflection on the issue of Greek culture. It involves the translation of Greek material into a new medium, as well as a new language, a ... More

The First Poets of Old Comedy  

Ian Storey

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter examines what we know of Old Comedy between two key dates, the traditional date of 486 for its formal introduction at the City Dionysia in Athens and the debut of Aristophanes ... More

Graphic Comedy: Menandrian Mosaics and Terentian Miniatures  

Sebastiana Nervegna

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter reviews our visual record for Greek New Comedy and Roman comedy. It reconstructs the long iconographic tradition of Menander’s plays, from the poet’s own lifetime until late ... More

Greek Comedy, the Novel, and Epistolography  

Regina Höschele

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter discusses the reception of Greek comedy in two genres of the Second Sophistic, tracing the appropriation of comic elements in the erotic novel and fictional epistolography. ... More

Hellenistic Mime and its Reception in Rome*  

Costas Panayotakis

Print publication date:
Jan 2014
Online publication date:
Dec 2013
This chapter focuses on the evidence for performances of mime drama in the Hellenistic period, both scripted and unscripted, and on its reception in Latin literature. It explores possible ... More

Hesiod and Tragedy  

Alan H. Sommerstein

Print publication date:
Sep 2018
Online publication date:
Aug 2018
The only Hesiodic myths taken up by the Greek tragic dramatists are the related stories of Prometheus and the first woman (Pandora); these were exploited in satyr-dramas by Aeschylus and ... More

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