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The Early Bronze Age of the Southern Caucasus  

Giulio Palumbi

Online publication date:
Oct 2016
The aim of this article is to highlight the social and cultural developments that took place in the Southern Caucasus during the Early Bronze Age. Between 3500 and 2500 BC ca., new ... More

From bovid to beaver: mammal exploitation in Medieval northwest Russia  

Mark Maltby

Print publication date:
Mar 2017
Online publication date:
Apr 2017
This chapter reviews evidence for the exploitation of animals in Medieval northwest Russia, highlighting the evidence from the town of Novgorod and its hinterland. The zooarchaeological ... More

Humans and mammals in the Upper Palaeolithic of Russia  

Mietje Germonpré and Mikhail Sablin

Print publication date:
Mar 2017
Online publication date:
Apr 2017
This chapter focuses on the mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and large canid (wolf (Canis lupus) and/or dog (Canis familiaris)) assemblages recorded at Upper Palaeolithic sites from the ... More

Plants, People and Diet in the Neolithic of Western Eurasia  

Amy Bogaard and Amy Styring

Online publication date:
Nov 2017
The establishment of farming is a defining feature of the Neolithic period in western Asia and Europe. Decades of archaeobotanical research have clarified the spectrum of crops that ... More

Post-Glacial Transformations among Hunter-Gatherer Societies in the Mediterranean and Western Asia  

Andrew M. T. Moore

Print publication date:
Apr 2014
Online publication date:
Sep 2013
The Mediterranean basin has experienced significant environmental change throughout the Holocene. This has conditioned human settlement and economy. Much of the coastline is backed by ... More

Upper Palaeolithic Hunter-Gatherers in Western Asia  

Ofer Bar-Yosef

Print publication date:
Apr 2014
Online publication date:
Jan 2014
A mosaic of habitats ecologically characterizes western Asia. These were formed and changed due to topographic variability as well as seasonal fluctuations of temperatures and ... More

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